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      CommentAuthorDuracell
    • CommentTimeJun 28th 2018
     
    • CommentAuthorBigOilRep
    • CommentTimeJun 28th 2018
     
    Ugh.
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeJun 28th 2018
     
    Ghaa!
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    Wanton
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      CommentAuthorDuracell
    • CommentTimeJun 28th 2018
     
    Wonton ...
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      CommentAuthorDuracell
    • CommentTimeJun 29th 2018
     
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeJun 29th 2018
     
    For Xi Jinping, however, there is no distinction between the virtual world and the real world: both should reflect the same political values, ideals, and standards.


    Do we really object to this in the era of Fake News? The only question is: what will be the values, ideals and standards. One's preference is to use external reality as a standard of comparison.
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      CommentAuthorDuracell
    • CommentTimeJun 30th 2018
     
    Posted By: Angus
    For Xi Jinping, however, there is no distinction between the virtual world and the real world: both should reflect the same political values, ideals, and standards.


    Do we really object to this in the era of Fake News? The only question is: what will be the values, ideals and standards. One's preference is to use external reality as a standard of comparison.


    In a leaked speech in August 2013, Xi articulated a dark vision: “The internet has become the main battlefield for the public opinion struggle.”
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeJun 30th 2018
     
    the virtual world and the real world: both should reflect the same political values, ideals, and standards.


    I ask again: what is wrong with this statement, taken on its own? If it is not true then the virtual world is a mere chaos. The problem comes when you fill in quantities for the "values, ideals, and standards". We don't like Mr. Xi's parameter vector. The trick is to say why ours would be better.
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      CommentAuthorpcstru
    • CommentTimeJun 30th 2018
     
    Posted By: Angus
    the virtual world and the real world: both should reflect the same political values, ideals, and standards.

    I ask again: what is wrong with this statement, taken on its own?

    What is not 'real' about the virtual world?

    The old saying "sticks and stones might break my bones but words can never hurt me" springs to mind. Some might say books are "virtual worlds", so should reflect the same ... etc.

    I'd say that what people refer to as a/the virtual world is just another part of the real world - like (say) books. Like books, the constraints are ... particular; in a virtual game no one actually dies, so someone playing the game might not want to be charged with murder.

    Then again, the statement is dripping with self evident tautological truthyness. Sane and rational political values/ideas/standards of course encompass the virtual worlds as different things but nerveless imposes values/ideas/standards - that is just ... culture.
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeJun 30th 2018
     
    Fair point. If I understand it properly I think it aligns with what I was trying to say.
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      CommentAuthorDuracell
    • CommentTimeJun 30th 2018
     
    Posted By: Andrew Palfreymanhttps://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/jan/10/xiaolu-guo-why-i-moved-from-beijing-to-london

    Very good read
    Yes, very good indeed. I enjoyed reading it. Thanks for posting it.
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      CommentAuthorDuracell
    • CommentTimeAug 2nd 2018
     
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      CommentAuthorDuracell
    • CommentTimeAug 24th 2018
     
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      CommentAuthorDuracell
    • CommentTimeAug 31st 2018
     
    Detention of Uighurs must end, UN tells China, amid claims of prison camps

    The UN Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination cited estimates that “from tens of thousands to upwards of a million Uighurs” may be detained in the far western Xinjiang province. Its findings were issued after a two-day review of China’s record, the first since 2009.

    China’s foreign ministry has rejected the allegations, saying anti-China forces are behind criticism of policies in Xinjiang.

    Independent experts said during the review that the panel had received many credible reports that a million ethnic Uighurs are held in what resembles a “massive internment camp that is shrouded in secrecy”. Panel expert Gay McDougall described it at the time as a “no-rights zone”.

    Former detainees who spoke to the Associated Press described the internment camps as facilities policed by armed guards where Muslims were forced to disavow their religious beliefs, criticise themselves and their loved ones and give thanks to the ruling Communist party. Claims of beatings and deaths have made it out despite authorities’ tight control on information from the region.

    The detention programme has swept up people, including relatives of American citizens, on ostensible offences ranging from accessing foreign websites to contacting overseas relatives. Other aspects of the security crackdown the AP has detailed include all-encompassing digital surveillance, mass deployment of police and severe regulations against religious customs and dress.
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      CommentAuthorDuracell
    • CommentTimeSep 13th 2018
     
    The Guardian view on Xinjiang: China’s secret camps are at last in the spotlight

    It is unthinkable. Yet week by week, the evidence mounts that in north-western China’s Xinjiang region, as many as a million people are being held in extralegal indoctrination camps where inmates are forced to write self-criticisms, sing patriotic songs and chant slogans praising the Communist party. According to former detainees, people appear to have been pulled in because they went abroad, because they engaged in conventional religious practices, or even because they do not speak Chinese. Many are held indefinitely. Some say they were tortured. Most of those held are Uighurs, who make up less than half of the 23 million population of the region, or belong to Kazakh or other Muslim minorities. One report, drawing upon official sources, suggests some areas have detention quotas.

    The camps are the most shocking aspect of an intense and all-encompassing crackdown, described by Human Rights Watch this week as amounting to rights violations of a scope and scale not seen in China since the Cultural Revolution unleashed in 1966. According to the group Chinese Human Rights Defenders, official data suggests a fifth of all arrests in China last year were in Xinjiang, which has just 1.5% of its population. The human cost is immense, as a new Guardian report reveals.
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      CommentAuthorDuracell
    • CommentTimeSep 13th 2018
     
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      CommentAuthorDuracell
    • CommentTimeSep 17th 2018 edited
     
    The thin skinned asshole “leaders” of the world seem to be learning from each other. First, Trump pulls “Justin from Canada” by the hair and makes him cry, and then MBS sends a message to the rest of the world not to dare to criticise Saudi Arabia by overreacting to Canada’s mild (within the boundaries of diplomatic norms) rebuke of Saudi Arabia, and in response, bullying Canada and making an example of it.

    Lesson: Find a much smaller and weaker liberal western power and find any old bullshit pretext to bully it for relentlessly in order to make an example of it for the rest of the world to see. Make it abundantly clear to everyone that you will no longer countenance any criticism whatsoever.

    It seems to me to be a lesson that Xi has learned well. He demonstrates his mastery of it by using this bullshit as a pretext to send a warning to other countries to not allow the Dalai Lama to visit them.

    China accuses Sweden of violating human rights over treatment of tourists

    Of course, the Chinese see through it, but they are not his target audience for this message:

    “This is shameful. The image of China has been disgraced in the hands of these people,” one Weibo user wrote.

    “The Dalai Lama visits Sweden and the foreign ministry uses this incident as a pretext to make a fuss. That’s more embarrassing than the performance of this family,” another wrote.

    “These people feel the world should move around them, if not, then they lie down on ground and scream for help,” one commentator wrote in an essay posted on WeChat.
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      CommentAuthorDuracell
    • CommentTimeSep 20th 2018