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      CommentAuthorDuracell
    • CommentTimeNov 21st 2018 edited
     
    Posted By: alsetalokinWhich places were those? Norway?

    Oh, right, they have guns there.


    I'm still not sure what the point is of the article that I was criticising, other than to scare people, or rather to make people who _don't_ live in the USA to see this place as exceptionally dangerous and a place to avoid--- especially our churches and schools.

    My points, however, are that one does not improve one's safety by any significant amount by not going to church or school or workplace, even in the USA, and also that people who want to kill you and your friends will find a way to do it, even if guns, explosives, and water balloons are outlawed.
    It wasn’t about certain types of places in the US being more dangerous from a gun violence perspective than other types of places in the US. The point being made was that because of the insanely high levels of gun violence in the US, nowhere is safe. And then she gave some specific examples of gun violence occurring in a very wide and different variety of places, including some types of places that you wouldn’t typically associate with gun violence, in order to illustrate her point.
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeNov 21st 2018
     
    Posted By: Terry LingleWell a much simpler version of it was attempter by Japan in WWII.


    You can see one of those balloons in the War Museum in Ottawa. They were pretty ineffective.

    But how is this relevant?
    • CommentAuthorloreman
    • CommentTimeNov 21st 2018
     
    Posted By: Terry LingleIf there are people of a terrorist or violent state of mind there will be senseless (to others) violence.
    The availability of
    a particular weapon is not the cause .

    A quick review of chemistry and physics will give any fertile mind enough material to cause Angus to feel threatened.

    I envision 200,000 toy helium baloons hoisting a rather large container of water with a couple of toy drones for guidance and a couple of RC servo's to cut the baloons away at the drop point.

    An arduino with a Gps module will get that contraption close to the target. a second control unit using a camera and a few selected landmarks will put it almost dead on.

    Now replace the water with gasoline and add an ignition device.
    A little luck and you have a poor mans fuel air bomb


    Perhaps this on a scaled up version would be even more fun
  1.  
    Fun yes

    When I was about 15 I built invisible balloons from 1/8 inc X 1/8 inch balsa sticks tied into a cross with sewing thread and a clear dry cleaner bag. the bag fit tight enough to hold the sticks in place forming a square mouth at the bottom of the bag
    I mounted 4 birthday candles on each stick set the bag over the cross I supported the bag until the hot air generated by the candles caused enough lift and up they went.
    This works best on cold days with no wind.
    When launched from someplace out of sight they often get to 1500 ft before the candles burn out and when spotted they are far enough up that there is no visible reference to aid in estimating size, altitude, or speed.
    .
    With no noise as from a motor they appear to hover for a few minutes then as the candles burn down it looks like the object is rising silently but very rapidly until the lights just merge into one then vanish.

    What I found most interesting was the number of different sightings they would get in a town of 2000 people.
    • CommentAuthorloreman
    • CommentTimeNov 22nd 2018
     
    No wonder sites like Gaia abound-it's all your fault!
  2.  
    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeNov 29th 2018
     
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeNov 29th 2018
     
    They will need sticks too, and some practice with the slapshot.
  3.  
    I should think a bocce ball would be more effective.
    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeNov 29th 2018
     
    Harder to carry in a backpack.

    On the other hand, a slingshot/catapult and a few steel bearing balls would be pretty daunting.
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeNov 29th 2018
     
    Easier to carry as well. What about a Glock?
    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeNov 29th 2018 edited
     
    You probably need a permit for a Glock--and you can't carry one in many states if you're a convicted felon. Hockey pucks and steel balls aren't subject to the same restrictions. But then, neither are flamethrowers.
  4.  
    Posted By: Asterix... you can't carry one in many states if you're a convicted felon.


    Well that certainly eliminates a lot of our local university kids. Maybe things are different in Michigan.
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      CommentAuthorDuracell
    • CommentTimeDec 13th 2018
     
    Gun deaths in US rise to highest level in 20 years, data shows

    A steady rise in suicides involving firearms has pushed the rate of gun deaths in the US to its highest rate in more than 20 years, with almost 40,000 people killed in shootings in 2017, according to new figures from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

    The CDC’s Wonder database shows that in 2017, 39,773 people in the US lost their lives at the point of a gun, marking the onward march of firearm fatalities in a country renowned for its lax approach to gun controls. When adjusted for age fluctuations, that represents a total of 12 deaths per 100,000 people – up from 10.1 in 2010 and the highest rate since 1996.

    What that bare statistic represents in terms of human tragedy is most starkly reflected when set alongside those of other countries. According to a recent study from the Jama Network, it compares with rates of 0.2 deaths per 100,000 people in Japan, 0.3 in the UK, 0.9 in Germany and 2.1 in Canada.


    Research by the Educational Fund to Stop Gun Violence underlines that the tragedy of gun violence and suicides is not spread randomly across the country, but is concentrated precisely in those places where gun ownership is most prevalent and gun laws at their loosest. When the fund analysed the new CDC statistics, it discovered the highest rates of gun suicides occurred in three states which also have the greatest gun ownership – Montana (19.4 gun suicides per 100,000), Wyoming (16.6) and Alaska (16.0).

    Alaska has the highest rate of gun ownership in the US, with 61.7% distribution. Wyoming (53.8%) and Montana (52.3%) are also at the top of the league table.

    The statistics speak to a brutally simple truth. Studies have shownd that suicide attempts often take place in a moment of hopelessness that can last barely minutes – which means that easy access to a firearm can in itself exponentially increase the risk of self-harm.

    “People often think with suicides involving firearms that there’s nothing we can do to prevent this,” said the Education Fund’s policy analyst, Dakota Jablon. “But looking at these numbers it’s clear that simply having a lot of guns around increases the danger.”

    Jablon pointed out that access to a gun in the home increases the odds of suicide more than threefold.
  5.  
    Darwin
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      CommentAuthorDuracell
    • CommentTimeDec 13th 2018
     
    How many guns did he own?
  6.  
    How many spacetimes did Einstein own?
  7.  
    Aaaaand... they're off for 2019 already!
    https://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-ln-torrance-shooting-20190105-story.html

    Just look at that enlightened 2nd Amendment go!
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeJan 5th 2019
     
    Don't you wish it would.
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeJan 12th 2019 edited
     
    Interesting interview with a US researcher on the Vancouver CBC morning radio.

    It turns out that Mexico has very strict gun laws. For example, the only place you can legally buy a handgun is at a single government shop, for the whole country. This probably comes as a surprise for most USans...the vast majority of the gun crime that Mexicans and Central Americans are fleeing is carried out with huge quantities of arms illegally crossing the Mexican border southward. If the wall were likely to cut (legal) gun sales in the US along the border, we might expect to see a bit of pushback - but it won't because most smuggling (in both directions) occurs at official crossing points, not in the middle of the desert where the contraband has to be transported cross-country.

    Likewise the Caribbean is awash in illegal US weapons. Likewise Canada, where 90% of weapons used in crime have been traced back to US sources.

    Maybe we should wall the US in and brick up the crossings.