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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTime7 days ago
     
    Of course back in the golden age we would have spent our time frolicking on the greensward with the nubile maidens, rather than struggling with recalcitrant electrons.
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      CommentAuthorDuracell
    • CommentTime7 days ago
     
    It's always the golden age for something(s) and someone(s) ...
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      CommentAuthormaryyugo
    • CommentTime7 days ago
     
    You say you can trigger the crash at will, so if you have more than one memory card see if running the PC with only one of them at a time makes any difference.

    Either there is a problem with a specific piece of hardware, or, even more likely, with a driver for a specific piece of hardware, or with your BIOS version etc. Make sure your BIOD, all hardware drivers and firmwares etc. are up to date.


    All good ideas. Downloading nVidia's latest driver as we speak. Dell is "supposed to" update automagically but I am not sure that works or how it works. Warranty and service agreement is expired-- but I think they still provide some level of support.

    Still, it is very odd that ONLY Sandboxie produces the error. System RAM is not under stress (35%) as per widget.

    Patch Tuesday was 4 days ago, so if you have applied Windows updates since then, one of them might not be playing nicely with something else.


    Another good idea but I am not sure I want to bother to reverse that.

    You mentioned using key generators obtained from links sourced on the Pirate Bay in another thread. If you are using pirated software then who knows what malware might be lurking around in there. MBAM is far from bullet-proof under such circumstances.


    The XPS8900 is my work machine and as such has only legitimate properly licensed software on it without exception unless I forgot something and I will look to make sure. I don't even access thepiratebay with it. And the whole idea of Sandboxie was that I use it to check out any link I need to see which may be questionable.
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      CommentAuthoralsetalokin
    • CommentTime7 days ago edited
     
    (snip)
    I get this:



    That's hilarious.... because I saw the very same BSOD on the local Sonic hamburger joint's order/ad screen a few days ago. And not for the first time either!

    EDIT: Actually... It was on Tuesday !!! LOL......

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q4rbDs702NE
    • CommentAuthorLakes
    • CommentTime7 days ago
     
    Eat a dodgy hamburger, have a crashdump.
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      CommentAuthorgoatcheez
    • CommentTime1 day ago
     
    How 'bout a blue screen of HAL

    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTime1 day ago
     
    A BSOD in Windows is about the same as a kernel panic in *nix isn't it?

    I can't even remember the last time I got a kernel panic screen.
  1.  
    Just woke up to a blue screen as it happens
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      CommentAuthoralsetalokin
    • CommentTime18 hours ago edited
     
    A friend just took possession of a Lenovo ThinkPad T430 from an Ebay seller. The friend wanted me to check it out and install Ubuntu Linux to try. The laptop had a "clean" Windows 7 Pro edition installed. But the SD card reader would not work. Never mind, first install Ubuntu Linux 16.04.2 from a live DVD as a dual-boot. This went flawlessly, splitting the HDD space between the Ubuntu and the Win7. Guess what... the SD card reader worked flawlessly along with all the other hardware such as bluetooth, wifi, DVD player, camera, etc. on the Ubuntu Linux installation right from the get-go, without any intervention from me. It just works. This of course eliminated a hardware fault as the reason for the Windows card reader not working and throwing yellow "unknown device" flags in Device Manager. The SD card reader on the Win 7 OS gave me fits. Windows Update couldn't find a driver for the Ricoh SD card reader. The latest driver downloaded from the Lenovo support site "installed" but it didn't actually work either. After at least three hours of futzing around, reading many many websites with postings about the same problem (Lenovo T-4xx laptops and Windows 7, 8, 10 card readers inop) I finally found some third-party driver that installed and got the SD card reader working, finally, and showing up correctly in Device Manager as the Ricoh card reader.
    Meanwhile, as I said before... the Ubuntu Linux installation's SD card reader (and everything else) worked perfectly, instantly and without any intervention from me. It's very cool to see the graphed activity of all four CPUs in the System Monitor Resources tab. I can't find any utility that does that for the Windows side. The Windows OS has frozen up several times while looking at Windows Update and Device Manager windows, requiring reboots. No problems whatsoever have been noted on the Linux side, and the Unity desktop is easier to use and nicer overall for the novice user than the Windows Desktop.
    And furthermore, the Linux side's file managers can see the Windows partition, copy/paste files from and to there, etc, but the Windows OS "explorer" cannot see the Linux partition.
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      CommentAuthorgoatcheez
    • CommentTime16 hours ago
     
    I have had a similar experience. My only bad experience with Ubuntu is with the Wifi adaptor. More than once when I did the same as you for a friend, the USB wifi adaptor worked the first time; but, would not connect afterward. Some were happy with a wired connection; but, I have two units that I can't get to connect and both are through a wpa2 enterprise security system.

    The complexity of this issue gives me a headache.
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      CommentAuthorpcstru
    • CommentTime15 hours ago
     
    Posted By: alsetalokinIt's very cool to see the graphed activity of all four CPUs in the System Monitor Resources tab. I can't find any utility that does that for the Windows side.

    Taskmgr.
  2.  
    You've told the router the correct MAC address of the computer's wifi adapter, entered the key correctly, tried changing the key in the router and then on the computer, all that obvious stuff, I'm sure.
    I had a similar problem some years ago with an older ThinkPad and it turned out that the wifi radio itself was faulty.
  3.  
    Posted By: pcstru
    Posted By: alsetalokinIt's very cool to see the graphed activity of all four CPUs in the System Monitor Resources tab. I can't find any utility that does that for the Windows side.

    Taskmgr.

    Oh yes, task manager. Don't get me started on that. Just which process must I kill in order to get the computer to close the unresponsive Control Panel window? With the Linux System Monitor it is easy to figure out which process might be offending. Windows? Not so much. And to have to press Ctrl-Alt-Del to get a link to TM to come up... right. Very User Friendly... if the user happens to be a MicroShaft Certified Technician or something.
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTime14 hours ago
     
    Reading this I am heartened at my personal strategy. Forget everything your ego thought you knew about computers. Back up regularly. Be anonymous. If anything weird happens recover everything from the last nonweird place you remember and go have a coffee.

    So far it has worked for me. I'm still on the 'trap, nobody has tried to steal my underwear, or if they did, I noticed.

    Oh - and try to stay under the radar. You might consider switching to Atari TOS, for example. Depending on your paranoia level.
    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTime14 hours ago
     
    Heh, while rummaging around in my desk, I found a 32MB SmartMedia card for a Fuji digicam I once owned. Fortunately, I also turned up a USB 1.1 SM card reader.

    It's of such a vintage that I suspected that XP or 95 might be the best bet, so I brought up a system with XP, then 95 and neither could locate a suitable driver. So, I plugged it into a Linux box--bingo! The contents came right up in file manager and I got to see what it was that I took snapshots of a long time ago.

    Of course, Linux still sucks for QIC-02 interface tape drives and nobody seems to have a Linux driver for my Chi PCTD16 tape drive card, but you can't have everything...
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      CommentAuthorpcstru
    • CommentTime14 hours ago edited
     
    Posted By: alsetalokin
    Posted By: pcstru
    Posted By: alsetalokinIt's very cool to see the graphed activity of all four CPUs in the System Monitor Resources tab. I can't find any utility that does that for the Windows side.

    Taskmgr.

    Oh yes, task manager. Don't get me started on that. Just which process must I kill in order to get the computer to close the unresponsive Control Panel window? With the Linux System Monitor it is easy to figure out which process might be offending. Windows? Not so much.

    The way processes are named has fuck all to do with the software listing those processes (taskmgr) and no, linux (or more properly some distribution) does not magically gift software authors with abilities to give meaningful names to processes. If you have found Linux easier than windows in that respect, perhaps it is luck or your training (familiarity with the platform)?

    And to have to press Ctrl-Alt-Del to get a link to TM to come up... right. Very User Friendly... if the user happens to be a MicroShaft Certified Technician or something.

    You can run it from the command line or by name from the search box. You are perhaps in danger of doing a Yugo, where ignorance and prejudice are combining to make your pronouncements look silly.

    If you haven't had the experience of banging your head against some stupid problem using Linux, you just haven't used it enough. Same goes for any OS or almost any reasonably complex technology. It's all pretty rubbish - a minor miracle that any of it works at all.
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      CommentAuthoralsetalokin
    • CommentTime13 hours ago edited
     
    Well, I clearly don't have the experience you have since I only "administer" my own computers and the occasional ones for friends, housemates and other innocent individuals. However, my responses here were meant to indicate that some problems that can be _directly traced_ to deficiencies in the Windows OSs simply do not occur with modern Linux distros, which are free to use without dodgy "activations" and which come out of the box fully functional, with handy applications like Libre Office and various web browsers and other utilities included for no additional cost. Certainly the casual user may occasionally experience some difficulty with a particular problem with Linux. But how many times has a certain Linux-avoiding user here reported BSODs or driver problems or other usability problems with Windows OSs? How many times have I or another user reported similar show-stopping problems with Linux distros? What does a legitimate license set for a Windows OS with MSOffice cost? What does a similarly capable Linux distro cost? If one is not a high-end gamer, what real "advantage" accrues from using Microsoft instead of Linux? What about susceptibility to malware? These are rhetorical questions of course.
  4.  
    But Active X!
    • CommentAuthorBigOilRep
    • CommentTime7 hours ago edited
     
    Posted By: alsetalokinCertainly the casual user may occasionally experience some difficulty with a particular problem with Linux.

    Casual users don't use Linux. It has 2% of the desktop market, and I reckon that is mainly geeks on moletrap.
    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTime4 hours ago edited
     
    Posted By: pcstruIf you haven't had the experience of banging your head against some stupid problem using Linux, you just haven't used it enough. Same goes for any OS or almost any reasonably complex technology. It's all pretty rubbish - a minor miracle that any of it works at all.


    I've banged my head for decades on various OS-related issues--it strengthens the character..

    The problem with Windows is that I'm not given the resources (source code) to fix them. I can report something and hope it gets fixed--eventually.

    Linux and BSD are quite different--I can locate a problem and repair it and then submit my suggested code for consideration for the general public. Heck, if you install VirtualBox on a Linux machine, you probably are re-compiling the kernel anyway.