Vanilla 1.1.9 is a product of Lussumo. More Information: Documentation, Community Support.

    •  
      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeJan 31st 2013 edited
     
    •  
      CommentAuthormaryyugo
    • CommentTimeJan 31st 2013
     
    Kewl. The seal needs a shave.
    •  
      CommentAuthorpcstru
    • CommentTimeJan 31st 2013
     
    That seals the deal ...
  1.  
    Penguin leaves ice cream parlor to check on his car. Mechanic says, "Blew a seal." Penguin, wiping face, "No, just ice cream."

    Barrump-bump!
    •  
      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeJan 31st 2013
     
    Naughty but funny.
    •  
      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeFeb 1st 2013
     
    That poor hagfish, although it is disliked because of the copious amount of slime it can produce, that slime may turn out to be a wonder material like silk.
    •  
      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeFeb 1st 2013 edited
     
    Posted By: TrimThat poor hagfish, although it is disliked because of the copious amount of slime it can produce, that slime may turn out to be a wonder material like silk.


    We could call it "slick".
    •  
      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeFeb 1st 2013 edited
     
    •  
      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeNov 6th 2014
     
  2.  
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8xcpauirEZQ
    She has this to beat. But she's amazing anyway.
    •  
      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeNov 7th 2014
     
    Well, she's got ten years to work on it. Zemdegs started when he was thirteen.
    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeJan 16th 2015
     
    •  
      CommentAuthorDuracell
    • CommentTimeJan 12th 2018
     
    Cork teen scoops top prize at BT Young Scientist fair

    A project that led to the discovery of a potential new antibiotic capable of beating antimicrobial resistant bacteria including MRSA has won the overall prize at this year’s BT Young Scientist and Technology Exhibition.

    The study by 15-year-old Simon Meehan from Coláiste Choilm in Ballincollig in Cork investigated the antimicrobial effect of parts of selected plants against the common bacteria Staphylococcus aureus (SA). 

    The project, which Simon has been working on for two years, was inspired by his grandfather, Eddie Lucey - a herbalist who used to create powders from common plants to help people who were sick

    Simon collected samples of the aerial and root parts of ten common plants in 40% ethanol.

    They were then tested for their antimicrobial effects on the bacterium Staphylococcus aureus.

    It is commonly found in the nose and on the skin of many healthy adults but some strains are resistant to antibiotics and can cause serious illness if they infect the body.

    Through independent testing, Simon found two extracts were effective in killing an antibiotic resistant strain of Staphylococcus aureus, MRSA.

    In particular, the results showed a high level of susceptibility of SA and MRSA to aerial and fruit parts of Bramble and to the root extract of Mare’s tail.

    "These are organic, they don’t harbour any toxicity that you may get from industrialised antibiotics," he said.

    "So to keep it as organic as possible in the future would be possibly the most fantastic thing, especially because antibiotics are very specific in what they do, whereas a plant may have many constituents that the bacteria will have to adapt to."

    Simon is now awaiting a patent on the extraction method for Bramble that can lead to its use as an antimicrobial.

    "There are so many places I can go with this," he said. "What really gutted me the whole way through the project was that I can’t take all routes I want, all trials and test everything because of time constraints." 


    Not bad for a school science project ...
  3.  
    Bloody brilliant.
  4.  
    I wonder if he tried cannabis or melaleuca oil.
    •  
      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeJan 13th 2018
     
    Just Guinness.
    •  
      CommentAuthormaryyugo
    • CommentTimeJan 13th 2018 edited
     
    Posted By: Duracell"These are organic, they don’t harbour any toxicity that you may get from industrialised antibiotics," he said.


    This is a misuse of the word "organic" and it's also categorically false. Whatever the active substance, it has to act by screwing up one or more processes in the bacteria. Bacteria share many metabolic pathways with mammals. One can not assume or guess the toxicity of the substance. It has to be very thoroughly tested.

    This sort of immaturity is excusable in the fifteen year old but not in his teachers and not in the reporter.

    "So to keep it as organic as possible in the future would be possibly the most fantastic thing, especially because antibiotics are very specific in what they do, whereas a plant may have many constituents that the bacteria will have to adapt to."


    No idea what this means. Seems to be gibberish.