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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeJun 22nd 2020 edited
     
    After the post-covid inflation that'll get you coffee and a bagel.
    • CommentAuthorBigOilRep
    • CommentTimeJun 22nd 2020
     
    Posted By: alsetalokin
    Posted By: tinker$10,500,000 million dollars


    I didn't think there was that much money in the world.

    That's "only" $10.5 trillion.

    Worldwide:
    There is approximately US $37 trillion in circulation: this includes all the physical money and the money deposited in savings and checking accounts.

    Money in the form of investments, derivatives, and cryptocurrencies exceeds $1.2 quadrillion."


    So easy peasy. Probably legit.
    •  
      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeJun 22nd 2020
     
    Posted By: BigOilRepThat's "only" $10.5 trillion.


    So you've finally switched over there? In the old standard that would be 10.5 billion (UK system).
    • CommentAuthorBigOilRep
    • CommentTimeJun 22nd 2020
     
    I mean the Fed will probably end up printing $10 trillion just keeping the bubble stock market propped up.

    They've already printed $2.3 trillion and chucked it about. Not sure how you actually get hold of any of it. I think you have to be a corporation or already very rich or something.
    • CommentAuthorBigOilRep
    • CommentTimeJun 22nd 2020 edited
     
    Posted By: AngusSo you've finally switched over there?

    Switched ages ago. Though we were going through it when I was at school - everything had to be UK billion or US billion, sometimes not telling you which for extra confusion.
    •  
      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeJun 22nd 2020
     
    Damn. I liked the old way. As with most things.
    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeJun 22nd 2020
     
    No, no! A milliard times no!
    •  
      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeJun 23rd 2020
     
    We don't need your Frenchified billion here, as I'm sure Trim will agree.
  1.  
    Posted By: BigOilRep
    Posted By: alsetalokin
    Posted By: tinker$10,500,000 million dollars


    I didn't think there was that much money in the world.

    That's "only" $10.5 trillion.

    Worldwide:
    There is approximately US $37 trillion in circulation: this includes all the physical money and the money deposited in savings and checking accounts.

    Money in the form of investments, derivatives, and cryptocurrencies exceeds $1.2 quadrillion."


    So easy peasy. Probably legit.


    I get lost in all the zeros. Most of my significant digits are zeros, anyway. And the rest are on my hands and feet.
    •  
      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeJun 29th 2020
     
    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeJun 29th 2020
     
    All too common nowadays, I'm afraid. I get scam solicitations, delivery notices, payment demands, etc. routinely everyday, it seems.
    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeJul 21st 2020
     
    DP COVID-19 Response Fund

    In response to the outbreak #COVID19, the Center for Disaster Philanthropy (CDP) has launched the CDP COVID-19 Response Fund to support preparedness, containment, response and recovery activities for those affected and for the responders.

    Please fill the W9 attached or if you already have W9 kindly send a copy of your W9 to the below email for fund processing.

    Email: covid-19.application@atzadvisor.com

    A representative will get back to you as soon as your application is received.

    Dr. Rowan Alkinson
    Executive Director
    Atz Advisor Group.
    Center for Disaster Philanthropy (CDP)
    United States


    emailed from a .pe (peru) domain. Rowan Alkinson? Shirley they mean "Atkinson".
    •  
      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeJul 21st 2020
     
    It's hard to say, old bean.
    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeJul 21st 2020
     
    It's odd--do a google image search on "Rowan Alkinson" and you still get lots of Mr. Bean hits along with the surname misspelling. I think it's a non-English thing.
    •  
      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeJul 21st 2020
     
    AP's comment about catch and release led me to wonder about the journal in which that thing about Pi was published. What came up fits here better than the Maths thread.

    Who knew the jungle was so vast...?
    •  
      CommentAuthorDuracell
    • CommentTimeJul 24th 2020
     
    Top lawyer accused of relaying offer of £1m 'bribe' to police, say court transcripts

    The judge in the trial, David Tomlinson, summarised the offer to pay money to the police as an “inducement by way of £1m”, but did not make any adverse findings against Stubbs and ultimately ruled against admitting the Crimint report as evidence.

    However, the judge said Stubbs appeared to think the plan to release the supposed CIA funds was “a clever idea” and described the senior lawyer’s alleged conversations with the police as “extraordinary”.

    “The whole thing is bizarre. I mean, there are all sorts of problems with it,” the judge remarked. “There are all sorts of questions one can imagine one might ask Mike Stubbs if only to show him how harebrained the idea is.” The police, the judge added, “simply blew the whole idea out of the water both times it was suggested, which was the responsible thing to do”.

    Stubbs, 64, is a veteran lawyer at Mishcon de Reya, an elite London firm. When the Guardian contacted him by phone, he denied any knowledge of the plot to release funds from Switzerland. “I’ve never heard of this,” he said. “It’s complete nonsense.”

    Describing himself as “a very straightforward lawyer”, Stubbs dismissed the allegations as “bonkers” and told a Guardian reporter: “I think this is manufactured by somebody, possibly by you.” He repeatedly insisted the meeting with the detectives never took place.

    In a subsequent letter, Mishcon de Reya clarified that Stubbs did in fact hold a meeting with the police in 2013 and said it was “unsurprising” he was unable to immediately recall the details in an “unsolicited telephone call” before checking contemporaneous documents.

    The firm said Stubbs met the detectives while acting on client instructions to liaise with the Met and provide any information to officers so they could assess its credibility. Stubbs, the firm said, “simply relayed” to the police the proposal suggested to him by the intelligence operative without endorsing it. The Met declined to comment.


    In late 2011, Stubbs was hired by Nobre, who at the time was seeking to regain control of money in the UK he said was for investment purposes but later transpired to be proceeds of the €100m fraud.

    Weeks later, in a highly unusual move, the Mishcon de Reya lawyer switched sides to represent Allseas after it became apparent the company had been defrauded. Since then, Stubbs and Mishcon de Reya have helped the Dutch company recover its client’s money and pursue Nobre’s associates through litigation.

    Mishcon de Reya said Stubbs regularly met with the Met over several years to provide information in relation to the fraud against Allseas. The meeting with the two detectives recounted in the Crimint report took place in October 2013.

    During December’s application, Louanjli’s defence tried to introduce the Crimint report as evidence in the trial in an attempt to undermine the prosecution. The request failed after Tomlinson ruled the evidence was not relevant as it had no “material bearing” on the issues in the trial.

    However, across two days of hearings in early December, Louanjli’s QC, Mark Rainsford, described to the court the alleged contents of the Crimint report, in which the detectives set out their account of the meeting with Stubbs. The purpose of the meeting, according to the Crimint report, was the “pursuit of outstanding monies”.

    Citing the report, Rainsford alleged that Stubbs told the officers the ex-SAS sergeant “with alleged CIA contacts” was offering to facilitate an elaborate scheme intended to trick Nobre, who at the time was on bail.

    Rainsford told the court the plan involved police temporarily returning Nobre’s passport to him to deceive him into thinking “his passport was being permanently returned and that proceedings would be terminated”. As part of this plan, he explained, Nobre would use the passport to access the €300m in the Swiss bank account.

    According to the QC, the Crimint report described how Stubbs told the officers the ex-SAS sergeant offered to arrange for £1m of this money to be paid to the Serious Organised Crime Agency – replaced in 2013 by the National Crime Agency – or into the Met’s pension fund “in order to ease the current austere environment.”

    Rainsford told the court the officers rejected this offer and “pointed out to Stubbs in clear and strongly worded terms that this offer was interpreted as a bribe, money laundering and an attempt to deceive a suspect on bail”.

    The QC alleged that Stubbs then repeated the offer from the ex-SAS sergeant a second time. “Again this was strongly rebuffed,” Rainsford said, and Stubbs “took this on board” before texting the ex-SAS officer with a brief message: “Too dangerous.”
    •  
      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeJul 25th 2020
     
    PRÒFESSIONAL SPORT

    Biggest con there is - hiding in plain sight.

    Ŕich owners enslave young athletes by careful bribery to extract wealth from the public. News media, civic governments unwilling bystanders are swept into the maelstrom of wasted money.
  2.  
    As your president I would abolish sports scholarships.

    At Teddy Hall (St. Edmund's Hall, an Oxford college) the running joke was that if you could catch a rugby ball at the entrance exam, you were in.
    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeAug 7th 2020
     
    Something that I thought was pretty much the provenance of the US East Coasters:

    Young man shows up in an unmarked pickup truck. Rings the doorbell and says he's doing some work in the area. Wants to know, since he's already here if we'd like our driveway sealed. Doesn't have a business card and can't tell me his contractor's license number or bonding agency.

    Told him politely that I thought that the Travellers were mostly on the East Coast and apologized for my lack of Shelta language skills.

    (The usual trick is to dump a bunch of used motor oil on the driveway. Looks great for about a week--after which the asphalt paving pretty much dissolves.)