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      CommentAuthorpcstru
    • CommentTimeNov 17th 2017
     
    Posted By: maryyugo
    I do not know any of the addresses or people's names in these emails.

    I'm sure they will only thank you for posting them onto an internet forum.
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      CommentAuthormaryyugo
    • CommentTimeNov 19th 2017 edited
     
    Posted By: pcstru
    Posted By: maryyugo
    I do not know any of the addresses or people's names in these emails.

    I'm sure they will only thank you for posting them onto an internet forum.


    I assumed since the email sent to these people with my spoofed return address was returned that the addresses are not good. But it's a good point so I will edit the post. Just in case.
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      CommentAuthormaryyugo
    • CommentTimeNov 19th 2017
     
    Scam phone call
    My daughter received a phone call and the caller left a voice mail message. He said he was Steven Harris from the Sheriff's office and she needed to call him back immediately regarding a situation that needs to be resolved before the end of the day. I told her to not give him any personal information but find out what he wants. He told her that she signed a summons on Oct 3rd ,to testify in court as a witness and needed to report to court on Nov 14th and she didn't show up. She needed to come down to the Sheriff's office for a handwriting analysis. As she told him that she couldn't do that, he said he would discuss with his supervisor when a better time would work. I called the Sheriff's Office and they told me that they do not operate that way. The sheriff's office said it was a scam. The number was 619-821-4070. My daughter is only 29 and wasn't sure how to handle this matter since this is her first "scam". Please inform others. I have reported it on the internet.


    OK sleuths, how does this one work? "She needed to come down to the Sheriff's office..." How does that help the scammer? She goes down there and they tell her, "WTF?" Maybe the informant left something out? Like "I can void the request for a fine of $500 by Western Union?" But nobody seems to have mentioned anything like that. ???
    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeNov 20th 2017 edited
     
    It's been going on for quite some time.

    I've even received calls from Lt. Steven Harris. My response: "Send a patrol car to pick me up."

    Hangs up.
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      CommentAuthormaryyugo
    • CommentTimeNov 20th 2017
     
    Posted By: AsterixIt's been going on for quite some time.

    I've even received calls from Lt. Steven Harris. My response: "Send a patrol car to pick me up."

    Hangs up.


    Either this is a bit different or the person reporting was inaccurate. I am guessing the account was incomplete and there was some sort of Western Union or cash card demand.

    God, I hate scammers. Pissy small inferior cockroaches of the human species.
    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeNov 20th 2017
     
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      CommentAuthormaryyugo
    • CommentTime5 days ago edited
     
    OK so this is sort of obvious but I can easily see how a not-too-techie individual maybe an older person can fall for it. I hate to admit it but if I was tired and in a hurry and not paying attention, I might fall for it.

    A TV ombudsman recently reported that a middle aged woman, a single working mother as it happens, received a call from a man allegedly from a Wells Fargo fraud team. He sounded very professional and gave her his name and "badge number." He told her he would not ask her any personal questions but he needed to verify her identity with respect to her account. He said he would send her a text message with a numeric code. He asked her to read him the code which she did and he then told her everything was fine and she was verified.

    In the next few minutes, she received all sorts of email notifications of transactions on her checking account, her daughter's linked account and her savings account. All her funds were transferred to her checking account and then drained via a Zelle-Pay payment.

    She ran to a branch bank and explained the predicament. The bank locked down the account but by then all her money was gone. She will probably get a refund (she didn't have more than about $1500 total) but it will take ten days during which time she has no access to funds and has to borrow from friends.

    Zelle, apparently, is the banks' answer to PayPal and Western Union. I don't know if you have to sign up for it. Anyway, the perp obviously had purchased the sign on name and password, maybe from a recent security break. All he needed to access the on line account was a text message verification code and she inadvertently gave it to him! I don't know how one uses Zelle but it sounds like a real threat as well. Guess I will have to learn about it.

    I think this is a variant of what is now called "smishing."

    (sorry if typos but late and in a hurry)

    ETA: yet another variant:

    https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/blog/2015/07/text-message-mess

    I think recent data breaches make these types of scams more common and more likely to succeed. Perps CAN get your sign on and password for such things as banks and Amazon. They CAN get your email address AND your phone number too. Shit. You can't run AND you can't hide.
  1.  
    Better Call Saul
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      CommentAuthorpcstru
    • CommentTime5 days ago
     
    Posted By: maryyugoI think recent data breaches make these types of scams more common and more likely to succeed. Perps CAN get your sign on and password for such things as banks and Amazon.

    In any reasonable system, a password will be encrypted with a one way hash - which means you cannot decrypt the clear text password. They can be brute forced - i.e. if you have the hash, you can generate hashes against a succession of guesses (say - every word in the dictionary) and see if you come up with the same hash. If you do, you have the password. Usually these days, brute forcing passwords in this way is impractical. So no one should be able to get passwords from a data breach involving the database of user accounts.

    Of course they don't need to, as your friend and may others are discovering. If they have enough information on you then ... well, people are easily tricked.
  2.  
    email from Dr. Stephanie Kelton of The Sanders Institute:
    Both the House and the Senate have passed versions of a GOP tax plan. According to analyses from the Tax Policy Center, the CBO and numerous economists, both plans overwhelmingly benefit the wealthiest people in this country, and both will result in the loss of health insurance for some 13 million Americans. Meanwhile, research warns that millions will face higher taxes and a spike in their health insurance premiums in the years ahead. And there isn’t a single credible study that supports the claim that either of these tax plans will deliver the kind of economic growth — with higher wages and substantially more jobs — the GOP is touting to sell their plan.

    In response to a plethora of criticism, and to defend their wild growth projections, Republicans recently circulated a letter, claiming to show that the economic community was backing their plan. What you may not know is that this letter was put together by a corporate advocacy group called the RATE Coalition and, as it turns out, some of the 137 signatories weren’t even economists.

    A portion of their letter reads: "Economic growth will accelerate if the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act passes, leading to more jobs, higher wages, and a better standard of living for the American people."

    Let us be clear. This is not what most economists believe. Tax cuts that create economic growth start at the bottom, not at the top.

    That is why my colleagues, John T. Harvey, Fadhel Kaboub, and I drafted our own statement and circulated it among professional economists. In the last 48 hours, more than 200 Ph.D. economists have added their names to our open letter.


    December 4, 2017
    An Open Letter to the U.S. Congress
    The tax plan will have disastrous consequences for the American people

    Dear Senators and Representatives:

    The current tax plan will prove ineffective at best. More likely, it will further the collapse of wages and widen the already dangerous levels of income and wealth inequality that have become so obvious that both political parties referenced them during the 2016 presidential campaign. Our central problem is not insufficient profits for corporations. Consumers, not employers, are the real job creators and cutting the corporate tax rate won’t jumpstart the economy. The key to getting businesses to hire and invest is to swamp them with demand for their products, something that is accomplished by raising the incomes of the poor and the middle-class and not those at the very top of the income distribution. Unfortunately, not only have the former faced stagnating wages and unemployment, but they are burdened by mortgage debt, credit card debt, student debt, and payday loan debt. Little wonder this has been the weakest recovery in the post-World War Two era.

    Cut taxes for the poor and the middle class and we will see an increase in wages and the creation of the kind of full-time jobs that we so desperately need. Cut corporate tax rates and corporations will end up sitting on an even bigger stockpile of cash. Period. There is no reason to believe that any jobs would come back to the United States or that more funds would be invested here. Firms invest because they expect strong demand for their products, not simply because they have higher profits. Strong demand will only materialize if consumers are empowered with higher wages and relieved of their debt burden.

    We, the undersigned economists, stand firmly opposed to the President’s tax plan. Reforms of some sort are not unwarranted, but if our goal is to improve the lives of American workers then this is absolutely not the route to take. Indeed, it may prove to be disastrous. Tax cuts that create economic growth start at the bottom, not at the top. It is not too late to make the current bill into something that could spur growth and employment and usher in a new era of prosperity for all Americans.
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      CommentAuthoraber0der
    • CommentTime4 days ago edited
     
    I would point and laugh in schadenfreude but unfortunately the damage this exercise in deliberate moronism causes will probably trickle down to almost everywhere. Even the flat-earthers around the globe may suffer a little.
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTime4 days ago
     
    Is it stupid to go looking for a rational reason why the US and UK have become utterly irrational?
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      CommentAuthoraber0der
    • CommentTime4 days ago edited
     
    Maybe it would be less stupid to have rational people go looking for reasons...
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTime4 days ago
     
    On the other hand, we moletrappers can take some pleasure in the sufferings of the flat-earthers.
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      CommentAuthoraber0der
    • CommentTime4 days ago edited
     
    Sad... In the end it's always us vs. the tribalists.
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTime4 days ago edited
     
    Good point! We should unite all right-thinking people in the sacred fight against the tribalist cockroaches.
  3.  
    Too much lipstick and not enough pig.
  4.  
    The irony is inescapable
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      CommentAuthormaryyugo
    • CommentTime4 days ago
     
    https://outbackvisionprotocol.com/

    Seriously! Aborigines in the Outback have the secret to restoring vision for virtually any cause of impending blindness. Hint: It's some sort of green drink and the formula will cost you $37.

    https://outbackvisionprotocol.com/
  5.  
    They also live forever and use antigravity when nobody is looking.