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      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeJul 16th 2013
     
    Posted By: legendre
    Posted By: Trim@Andrew

    Have you considered switching to E cigarettes?

    They are more expensive then normal ones but are a lot safer, indeed the NHS is considering putting them on prescription.


    More expensive? On initial purchase, sure - but over time, they cost a tiny fraction of tobacco cigarettes.

    So what were +you+ smoking, Trim?


    I used to be a very heavy smoker thirty years ago but gave it up after a bet with my then girlfriend.

    If they do put E cigs on prescription I might be tempted to try them as OAP's get free prescriptions and nicotine can help boost your concentration and is benign compared to all the nasties in a normal cig.
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      CommentAuthoraber0der
    • CommentTimeJul 16th 2013
     
    E cigs could be very expensive if you extinguish them in your E beer bottle.
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      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeJul 16th 2013
     
    Well if a 'smoker' wants to travel in space then E cigs or patches are all they would be allowed.
    • CommentAuthorsonoboy
    • CommentTimeJul 16th 2013 edited
     
    Posted By: Andrew PalfreymanYes, the conservation issue is the point of maximum controversy. Because the theory is Machian, the rest of the mass in the universe is anyway necessarily involved. Wheeler-Feynman advanced waves are Woodward's book-balancing mechanism, on a cosmic scale.

    Argumentation around this particular issue got me booted out of the inner circle last year, having been there for over a decade. It's not that I "proved the theory wrong" so much as some of the consequences embarrassed Woodward.


    Actually I think something that might work was proposed by Henry Wallace when he worked as an engineer for GE Aerospace. He devised an apparatus that used high speed spinning disks of metals comprised of elements of 1/2 integral nuclear spin to cause rather large (11 deg c) thermal changes in materials as well as some minor physical equilibrium effects. The basic idea being that spinning disks of materials with unpaired proton or neutron spin would cause a detectable mass field generated adjacent to them. If this mass field were to be varied sinusoidally inside a properly constructed housing (toroid) a gravity field would be induced at right angles to it, the result being an anti parallel field force vector to the Earths field.

    Here's my input. There are better ways to align protons such as using powerful magnetic fields at very low temperatures. Any of you guys out there with access to good cryogenic equipment could construct such a device without moving parts. I claim a 1% royalty on any flying toroid's so constructed...
  1.  
    You can't claim anything, since it's either patented or now in the public domain.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anti-gravity
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeJul 16th 2013 edited
     
    Oh better and better. I must try to find time to get into the first ten kilobytes.

    So much more fun than Rossi.
    • CommentAuthorsonoboy
    • CommentTimeJul 16th 2013 edited
     
    Posted By: AngusOh better and better. I must try to find time to get into the first ten kilobytes.

    So much more fun than Rossi.


    I would start here for fun, and begin with

    Henry W. Wallace:
    "Concerning Mass Dynamic Interactions"

    The other guy who wrote the preface made several major errors so skip the preface.

    http://www.rexresearch.com/wallace/wallace.htm
  2.  
    Now look what you've done.
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeJul 16th 2013
     
    I think I'll be safe.
  3.  
    Nobody has ever measured any net force with this.
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      CommentAuthorpcstru
    • CommentTimeJul 16th 2013
     
    Posted By: Andrew PalfreymanThen there's the high frequency gravity wave research from Baker. In all functional respects, just like the GoNowhere drive


    The interviewer's voice seems to have almost exactly the same character as Al's - but shifted a little higher. Co-incidence, 'eh?
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeJul 16th 2013
     
    Wow. I certainly don't hear that!
  4.  
    Isn't that Tim Ventura doing the interview?

    You really can't go by my accent. I've been corrupted in many ways. In the first place I'm a natural mimic, which has gotten me into trouble before. If I'm at a gathering where people are speaking English with a "foreign" accent, pretty soon I'm speaking that way too, I can't help it and it has gotten me thrown out of more than one venue when people think I'm mocking them.
    Then, my first first language was German, learned at the bosom of my Mutti and mostly forgotten by age 6, by which time I was speaking East Texas English due to my cousins and aunts and uncles in Houston.
    Then, the IHS nuns at various grade schools were using some kind of tape machine that was supposed to teach all the Mexican kids and the few Anglos (as we were called) and Negroes from the orphanages how to enunciate in perfect Bostonian diction. Listen, readback, record, analyze, repeat, until your little Mexican kids, whose parents didn't speak English at all, wound up sounding like baby Walter Cronkheits.
    Then I spent time in California, Texas, Canada and Alpha Ophiuchi 8, where the regional accent is really thick.
    Nowadays I hear myself speak and I can hear Canadian dipthongs, British consonants and Texan drawls in the same sentence.
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      CommentAuthorGrimer
    • CommentTimeJul 16th 2013 edited
     
    Posted By: tinkerI see you have strong opinions on this topic Andrew.

    http://www.americanantigravity.com/news/space/andrew-palfreyman-on-inertial-propulsion.html

    Haha - I had to laugh. I see I am not the only one building castles in the air.

    The change in weight could well be the Laithwaite effect on a smaller scale. I shall have to read the rest of Andrew's stuff.

    Good find tinker.
  5.  
    There is no "change in weight" involved in any "Laithwaite effect" as the good professor himself acknowledged towards the end of his life. He also retracted many of the incorrect claims he made at the famous "suppressed" lecture at the RS.
    • CommentAuthorsonoboy
    • CommentTimeJul 16th 2013
     
    Posted By: Andrew PalfreymanNobody has ever measured any net force with this.


    Not true. In his patent " Method and apparatus for generating a dynamic force field" he clearly demonstrated the cooling effect of this dynamic field and it's ability to permeate stationary material comprised of odd nuclear spin, the results of which were well above experimental noise..
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      CommentAuthorGrimer
    • CommentTimeJul 16th 2013 edited
     
    Posted By: alsetalokinThere is no "change in weight" involved in any "Laithwaite effect" as the good professor himself acknowledged towards the end of his life. He also retracted many of the incorrect claims he made at the famous "suppressed" lecture at the RS.


    Posted By: alsetalokinThere is no "change in weight" involved in any "Laithwaite effect" as the good professor himself acknowledged towards the end of his life. He also retracted many of the incorrect claims he made at the famous "suppressed" lecture at the RS.

    If you were mentally browbeaten as much as he was, you would have retracted too. I've had a long correspondence with him. I've gone down to Sussex to talk with him and Dawson and see his research project. I think I can claim to know his real opinions better than you.

    And now I have to go an meet the three little Nutters from school.
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      CommentAuthoralsetalokin
    • CommentTimeJul 16th 2013 edited
     
    Really? Did you somehow miss the fact that he died, fifteen years ago?

    I have more real data on the behaviour of gyroscopes in forced precession than you do, Frank. I don't care whether you know the opinions of a dead man better than I do.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=npEiWL9gyFU

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4VX-YWoNm10
    • CommentAuthortinker
    • CommentTimeJul 16th 2013
     
    I must confess I liked Lathwaite's rocket-assisted speedway bikes best of all.
  6.  
    Posted By: tinkerI must confess I liked Lathwaite's rocket-assisted speedway bikes best of all.

    He was a great lecturer and he did some great work. Unfortunately his gyro work is not representative of his greatness.