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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeSep 10th 2014
     
    The BAE 146 makes a similar sort of row, and also suffers from a lot of buffetting and noise when the flaps go down on approach. Every time I flew in one when Air Canada operated them we used to get a warning from the pilot about that. Otherwise passengers tended to panic, apparently.
  1.  
    Rapid-onset hypoxia is fun when it happens in the altitude chamber during a class. My own experience with it was at 24,000 feet over the Tehachapi Pass, in a 1-26 sailplane. And I didn't even have a mask, I was sucking oxy from a tube. All was fine until I decided to see what would happen. So I took the tube out of my mouth and took a couple breaths of ambient. And that was all it took, I had the same experience that MY described. I was able to stick the tube back in my mouth, turn the flow up and open the speedbrakes with my left hand, and point the nose down with my right hand before going completely black. Fortunately I got the tube in my mouth fast enough and the blackout was only a second long.
    Now that's fun.
    For real high altitude flying in the lee wave in those parts we generally carried three oxy systems: A diluter-demand system as primary, a continuous flow system as backup and a 5-minute bailout bottle strapped to the parachute harness.
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      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeSep 11th 2014
     
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      CommentAuthormaryyugo
    • CommentTimeSep 11th 2014 edited
     
    Posted By: TrimD

    A close up look at the Airlander – the world’s largest and greenest aircraft.

    http://www.dreammagazine.co.uk/close-up-look-at-the-airlander/?utm_medium=advertising&utm_source=outbrain&utm_campaign=outbrainJune2014&utm_content=airlander_closeup


    Sort of looks like a fat lady trying to sit down.

  2.  
    I was surprised by that top speed of 100 mph
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeSep 11th 2014 edited
     
    In July 1916 Luftschiffbau Zeppelin introduced the R-class, 199.49 m (644 ft 8 in) long, and with a volume of 55,210 m3 (1,949,600 cu ft). These could carry loads of three to four tons of bombs and reach speeds of up to 103 km/h (64 mph), powered by six 240 hp (180 kW) Maybach engines.


    Given another 98 years of development a 60% improvement in speed doesn't seem unreasonable.
  3.  
    The helium is going to get spendy too
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      CommentAuthoralsetalokin
    • CommentTimeSep 11th 2014 edited
     
    Posted By: Andrew PalfreymanI was surprised by that top speed of 100 mph

    Surely that is groundspeed, attained with a strong tailwind.

    I'd like to see how a model behaves in a wind tunnel at an _airspeed_ of 100 mph. To get some idea, you can get on the 101, floor it, and dangle a big helium balloon out the window on a string.
  4.  
    Well, that's cheating. Fuck 'em
  5.  
    Posted By: Andrew PalfreymanWell, that's cheating. Fuck 'em


    I'm not sure about that, of course. But a blimp going 100 mph airspeed boggles my mind, at any rate.
  6.  
    Posted By: Angus
    In July 1916 Luftschiffbau Zeppelin introduced the R-class, 199.49 m (644 ft 8 in) long, and with a volume of 55,210 m3 (1,949,600 cu ft). These could carry loads of three to four tons of bombs and reach speeds of up to 103 km/h (64 mph), powered by six 240 hp (180 kW) Maybach engines.


    Given another 98 years of development a 60% improvement in speed doesn't seem unreasonable.

    I dunno. The thing doesn't look nearly as aerodynamic as an R-class Zeppelin, to me, and it's a blimp, to boot, not a rigid airship.
    I'm very skeptical that they can actually sustain a 100 mph cruise airspeed. I'd like to take a ride in it though.
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeSep 11th 2014
     
    WIki says just barely
    The disadvantages are that an airship has a very large reference area and comparatively large drag coefficient, thus a larger drag force compared to that of aeroplanes and even helicopters. Given the large frontal area and wetted surface of an airship, a practical limit is reached around 130–160 kilometres per hour (80–100 mph). Thus airships are used where speed is not critical.
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeSep 11th 2014 edited
     
    Wiki also says
    Steve Fossett and Paul Stroehle set the current speed record for airships over a distance of one kilometer on Wednesday, October 27, 2004 in Friedrichshafen, Germany with a Zeppelin NT. The new world record was set to 111.8 kilometres per hour (69.5 mph), an improvement of 19 km/h.


    However the Zeppelin NT is a semi-rigid helium filled airship.

    The achieved speed is still below the maximum performances of the old rigid airships. For example the old Zeppelin LZ 129 Hindenburg and LZ 130 Graf Zeppelin II were able to fly at more than 130 km/h and the American airship ZRS 5 Macon even reached a top performance of 140.3 km/h. However these top speeds were never verified in the way defined by the FAI record definition where the influence of the wind is reduced by having the airship fly a course in both directions. For that reason these old achievements could not be recognized by the FAI as existing records and all the speed records achieved so far only list modern airships with lower speeds.


    Ref
  7.  
    Nobody seems to be taking the trouble (except Al) to differentiate between air speed and ground speed
  8.  
    Posted By: AngusWIki says just barely
    The disadvantages are that an airship has a very large reference area and comparatively large drag coefficient, thus a larger drag force compared to that of aeroplanes and even helicopters. Given the large frontal area and wetted surface of an airship, a practical limit is reached around 130–160 kilometres per hour (80–100 mph). Thus airships are used where speed is not critical.

    I can imagine all kinds of aerodynamic instabilities. Say you hit a Canada Goose at 100 mph, and the goose bounces off. This will cause a ripple in the flexible surface, which will result in a "rippling flag" effect due to the disturbed flow across the distorted surface. This ripple will act like any other aerodynamic flutter phenomenon, increasing in amplitude until a great strip of skin rips off the envelope and lets all the helium out.
  9.  
    Posted By: Andrew PalfreymanNobody seems to be taking the trouble (except Al) to differentiate between air speed and ground speed

    And the FAI, of course. Speed records have to be out-and-return or over other closed-course geometries, I think.
  10.  
    Or a Spruce Goose
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeSep 11th 2014 edited
     
    Posted By: Andrew PalfreymanNobody seems to be taking the trouble (except Al) to differentiate between air speed and ground speed

    Posted By: Andrew PalfreymanI was surprised by that top speed of 100 mph


    Including you and the video. So we are free to quote any kind of speed.
  11.  
    Time for a Kickstarter for a supersonic blimp
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      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeSep 11th 2014
     
    An underwater one?