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      CommentAuthorgoatcheez
    • CommentTimeJan 25th 2018
     
    With the right headwind, any plane can be a VSTOL:

    https://gfycat.com/realisticancientjunebug
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    Nice!
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      CommentAuthormaryyugo
    • CommentTimeJan 25th 2018
     
    I want those tires!
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      CommentAuthormaryyugo
    • CommentTimeJan 25th 2018
     
    Posted By: alsetalokinThat's pretty amazing. Supposedly the right engine produced some "uncommanded" thrust during the rollout which drove them off the pavement.



    Could have been much much worse. Can you imagine the difficulty of fighting a fire in that position, or even worse had it slid further down the slope...

    What a view that must have been from the cockpit, as the nose went out over the precipice...

    (Note the location of the right engine... in the water...)


    "The controller said turn LEFT at CHARLIE. LEFT, as in the opposite of RIGHT."
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      CommentAuthorgoatcheez
    • CommentTimeFeb 7th 2018
     
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeFeb 7th 2018
     
    "...there are no reported injuries at this time."

    Presumably the victims will be injured later?

    Why not "...there are no injuries reported at this time"...?

    What's so hard about thinking a little?
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      CommentAuthorDuracell
    • CommentTimeFeb 7th 2018
     
    Posted By: AngusWhat's so hard about thinking a little?
    Knowing when to stop? ...
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeFeb 7th 2018
     
    There is that...
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      CommentAuthormaryyugo
    • CommentTimeFeb 7th 2018 edited
     
    Is this is an example of doctor vs airplane? A pilot making the classic error of trying to return to the airport without enough energy when the engine falters or fails? The video is intriguing. Curious what Al. thinks of it. Maybe a stall-spin?

    http://www.cbs8.com/story/37438514/small-plane-crashes-in-santee
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      CommentAuthoralsetalokin
    • CommentTimeFeb 8th 2018 edited
     
    Hard to say. The video seems to show either a panic turn or possibly a spin entry at the top, but then it seemed to recover and at the end of the video it seemed to be flying again, in more of a normal flight attitude, albeit descending.
    It certainly looked to me that the aircraft had plenty of altitude to make a decent 180 degree turn when the badness began. It wasn't spinning at the end of the video.
    The Cessna 182 is a very forgiving aircraft, not like the usual "forked tail doctor-killer" like the V35 Bonanza, or one of the slippery Mooneys.
    I wonder if the dogs contributed in some way.
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    I flew dozens of C182 hours and it was a bit like a bus.
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      CommentAuthormaryyugo
    • CommentTimeFeb 8th 2018
     
    It looked at first glance as if the aircraft slowed almost to zero air speed at the end of the clip but I think on closer examination that it turned away from the camera and the slowing was an illusion. At first glance it seemed almost to hover but I don't think that happened. Tragic, whatever reason.
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      CommentAuthorDuracell
    • CommentTimeFeb 11th 2018
     
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      CommentAuthormaryyugo
    • CommentTimeFeb 11th 2018
     
    Saratov Airlines is based in Saratov, 840km south-east of Moscow.

    In 2015 it was banned from operating international flights when surprise inspectors found someone other than the flight crew was in the cockpit.


    Probably unrelated but some Russian pilots have a history of allowing their women friends and children to fly the plane.
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      CommentAuthoralsetalokin
    • CommentTimeFeb 11th 2018 edited
     
    That speed-altitude graph from FlightRadar24 is pretty scary looking. Those graphs can be unreliable though. Certainly they hit the ground with considerable velocity -- not only aren't all the big pieces in one pile, there aren't even any big pieces.

    What miserable weather - for flying, for crashing, and for rescue/recovery.
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      CommentAuthorgoatcheez
    • CommentTimeFeb 11th 2018
     
    Microburst?
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    Maybe? If I am interpreting the METAR correctly there were cumulonimbus in the area.
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      CommentAuthoralsetalokin
    • CommentTimeFeb 20th 2018 edited
     
    Looks like this one is down to:
    1. Aircraft does not have automatic pitot heat -- it must be turned on manually. -- design flaw.
    2. Weather sucked, icing conditions. -- organizational pressure to fly anyway.
    3. Pilots did not turn on pitot heat before takeoff. -- pilot error, failure to follow checklists, complacency.
    4. Pitot system froze up, causing faulty instrument readings especially airspeed. -- pilot error, failure to recognize fault, poor training.
    5. Autopilot disconnected, pilots responded incorrectly to faulty airspeed indication and dove the airplane into the ground trying to "pick up speed". -- pilot error, resulting in smoking hole in the snow.
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      CommentAuthormaryyugo
    • CommentTimeMar 13th 2018 edited
     
    https://www.ndtv.com/world-news/plane-from-bangladesh-crashes-at-nepals-kathmandu-airport-1822772

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/US-Bangla_Airlines_Flight_211

    US-Bangla BS211 at Khatmandu crash... this the ATC recording. I wonder what Al thinks:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WrKQ80XeywA

    Pilot seems confused as to whether cleared to land runway 20 or same runway opposite direction runway 02. At 2:46 very confusing... controller seems to be saying "US-Bangla 211, I say again ..." and then what sounds like "don't" but it's cut off in the middle. I can't figure out anything after that. Not clear to me where the crash occurs but I have limited time to listen.