Vanilla 1.1.9 is a product of Lussumo. More Information: Documentation, Community Support.

    • CommentAuthorYAFFP
    • CommentTimeMar 16th 2010
     
    Posted By: AngusNo no! Those mags have ads that say

    Harder disk within three weeks!!!!
    Guaranteed!!!!


    I bow to your inherent knowledge of the subject.
    •  
      CommentAuthoralsetalokin
    • CommentTimeMar 16th 2010 edited
     
    Posted By: Grimer
    Posted By: Angus
    Posted By: GrimerI'm making slow progress in understanding what is going on in the Pop Keenie wheel. I believe has to be a mental gymnast and have the same kind of agility that is needed to understand the Gnome rotary engine for example. I found the stationary crankshaft a particularly difficult concept. I found I had to imagine going round with the cylinders so that they are stationary relative to oneself and then the crankshaft and plane, etc., are revolving.

    http://www.animatedengines.com/gnome.shtml


    Gotta watch that gyroscopic twist. Lost a lot of Sopwith Camels that way.

    I reckon it would challenge even Al's piloting skills.

    "The Camel was credited with shooting down 1,294 enemy aircraft, more than any other Allied fighter in the First World War."

    FascinatingWiki article on the Camel.

    When I was active, I was pretty good. Most of my power time is in taildraggers of one kind or another, but all the engines were right-side-out.
    A Sopwith Camel is one thing, but at least all the factors affecting aircraft control and performance were, well, attached to the aircraft. Try sitting in the front office of a Bellanca 8GCBC Scout, with a fully-ballasted 820 kg Nimbus 4D tied on behind you at the end of a 200 foot rope.

    The gyroscopic precession factor (called P-factor) causing a pronounced yaw when transitioning from the 3-point attitude (nose high) to 2-wheel rolling (nose level) and then again to nose high on climbout, combined with engine torque exerting a rolling moment, caused many crashes, and still does, if the pilot isn't on top of things rudder-wise.
    But it's nothing like having a sailplane pulling your tail around; you don't know which way that sucker is going to get out-of-position; if you hit any of your control stops and your attitude is still changing adversely, you had better find the tow release right quick like or you are going to eat some dirt. Most exciting is the poor gliderguider sod's first solo aerotow. Give me a lonnnnggg runway, please....and you can be sure in the towplane my hand moves from throttle to tow release and stays there for the duration.
    Ah. The memories.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RnQ4gWPc9nw&feature=related
    •  
      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeMar 16th 2010 edited
     
    No they are not allowed. Canadians must use the Binsperanto Code developed by geeky 8th graders in the 1970s as an alternative to the US information technology hegemony.

    Well in that case I am withdrawing your right to communicate in English.
    •  
      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeMar 16th 2010
     
    Posted By: alsetalokinA Sopwith Camel is one thing,


    Here's an anecdote I've never been able to verify. The seals in rotary engines were never perfect, so they threw a lot of oil back at the open cockpit. Apparently castor oil was commonly used as the engine lubricant in WWI fighters. (It has rather good high temperature performance.) Can't help inhaling the stuff one way or another, so it was not uncommon to see the pilot leap from his plane after a hasty landing and make a mad dash for the squadron facility.

    The indignity of war.
  1.  
    Heh. Well, I can at least verify the castor oil usage, if not all the effects therefrom.
    •  
      CommentAuthorGrimer
    • CommentTimeMar 17th 2010
     
    Posted By: alsetalokin ... The gyroscopic precession factor (called P-factor) causing a pronounced yaw when transitioning from the 3-point attitude (nose high) to 2-wheel rolling (nose level) and then again to nose high on climbout, combined with engine torque exerting a rolling moment, caused many crashes, and still does, if the pilot isn't on top of things rudder-wise.
    But it's nothing like having a sailplane pulling your tail around; you don't know which way that sucker is going to get out-of-position; if you hit any of your control stops and your attitude is still changing adversely, you had better find the tow release right quick like or you are going to eat some dirt. Most exciting is the poor gliderguider sod's first solo aerotow. Give me a lonnnnggg runway, please....and you can be sure in the towplane my hand moves from throttle to tow release and stays there for the duration.
    Ah. The memories.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RnQ4gWPc9nw&feature=related

    I suppose being a tow pilot is a bit like having kids. There is the same feeling of dependency in each reacting in the right way until one or other releases the rope that ties you together.
  2.  
    Or it breaks, from the lack of sufficient compressive strain.







    Or too much tension, whichever.
    • CommentAuthorjoshs
    • CommentTimeMar 17th 2010
     
    Posted By: Angus
    Posted By: YAFFP
    Posted By: AngusI have seen adverts in computer mags for

    Hard dick
    (used)


    Admit it you read that in some other sort of mag, not that there is anything wrong with that.


    No no! Those mags have ads that say

    Harder disk within three weeks!!!!
    Guaranteed!!!!
    I thought they said: "Grow your hard disk in four weeks for free!"
    •  
      CommentAuthormaryyugo
    • CommentTimeMar 17th 2010
     
    I suppose being a tow pilot is a bit like having kids. There is the same feeling of dependency in each reacting in the right way until one or other releases the rope that ties you together.
    And then, it can end this way. (very short Youtube video)
  3.  
    Well, that's a remarkable video.
    In all my years I've never before heard of a third aircraft striking the towrope during an aerotow. An aircraft towing another aircraft has the right of way over all other powered aircraft except those in distress; clearly somebody was where they weren't supposed to be, when they weren't supposed to be there.
    But the ballistic chute worked well.

    Midair collision...there's not much to say about it, except that you don't want it to happen. I can remember the 1991 World Gliding Championships, held that year in Uvalde TX. We had 120+ sailplanes and 12 towplanes, and we managed to get all 120 (more or less) gliders launched each contest day -- in under one hour. It wasn't unusual to have 50 gliders loitering in the same thermal near the start gate; the race can't officially begin until everyone in the class is launched. The towing went flawlessly, pretty much without incident, although there was one midair between gliders during the contest; one pilot was killed, the other parachuted safely.
    •  
      CommentAuthormisterfish
    • CommentTimeMar 17th 2010
     
    Posted By: joshsI thought they said: "Grow your hard disk in four weeks for free!"


    Nah, it's usually " grow of an enormous pianist in only three days! "