Vanilla 1.1.9 is a product of Lussumo. More Information: Documentation, Community Support.

    •  
      CommentAuthorgoatcheez
    • CommentTimeDec 30th 2019
     
    •  
      CommentAuthorgoatcheez
    • CommentTimeJan 3rd 2020
     
    •  
      CommentAuthorgoatcheez
    • CommentTimeJan 3rd 2020
     
    •  
      CommentAuthorgoatcheez
    • CommentTimeJan 12th 2020
     
    •  
      CommentAuthorgoatcheez
    • CommentTimeJan 16th 2020 edited
     


    Don't miss these contest winners from Wiki Media Foundation.
    •  
      CommentAuthorgoatcheez
    • CommentTimeJan 20th 2020
     
    Hofstadter's Butterfly

    •  
      CommentAuthorgoatcheez
    • CommentTimeJan 27th 2020
     
    This NASA Visualisation of a Black Hole Is So Beautiful, We Could Cry

    R
    •  
      CommentAuthorgoatcheez
    • CommentTimeFeb 1st 2020
     


    When mysterious glowing stripes of green lit up Finnish skies in 2018, it didn't go unnoticed by avid aurora chasers. The pattern of light was unfamiliar and strangely perfect, reaching out toward the horizon like a set of celestial sand dunes.

    Sure enough, the light show dubbed by the citizen scientists as "the dunes" turned out to be a new type of aurora. This aurora is formed by the dramatic dance of gravity waves and oxygen atoms, according to new findings published today (Jan. 29) in the journal AGU Advances.

    R
  1.  
    Gravity waves? - not likely!
    •  
      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeFeb 1st 2020
     
    Too high, I'm pretty sure.
  2.  
    Posted By: Andrew PalfreymanGravity waves? - not likely!
    A different kind of gravity wave. Meteorological gravity waves are waves in the upper atmosphere. Physical gravity waves are waves in the ether.
    •  
      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeFeb 1st 2020
     
    Aurora occurs in the thermosphere or higher. Gravity waves are ripples in the troposphere and stratosphere. I think the air in the thermosphere is too thin to propagate ripples like that.
    •  
      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeFeb 1st 2020
     
  3.  
    Incipient? You mean inchoate, nascent?
    •  
      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeFeb 1st 2020 edited
     
    That would depend on whether the observation is of a precursor or part of the event itself. A fine distinction. The way it is written, it does seem to fit inchoate better. Thanks..
    •  
      CommentAuthoralsetalokin
    • CommentTimeFeb 1st 2020 edited
     
    Posted By: AngusAurora occurs in the thermosphere or higher. Gravity waves are ripples in the troposphere and stratosphere. I think the air in the thermosphere is too thin to propagate ripples like that.


    The ripples in the photo did seem to be higher than the aurora curtains.

    At least they didn't decide to name it "Fred" or "Julie".
    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeFeb 1st 2020
     
    Posted By: alsetalokinA different kind of gravity wave. Meteorological gravity waves are waves in the upper atmosphere. Physical gravity waves are waves in the ether.


    •  
      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeFeb 1st 2020
     
    Just call me Ethyl. Di for short.
    •  
      CommentAuthorgoatcheez
    • CommentTimeFeb 2nd 2020
     


    The photo, captured by Christopher Small, was taken in Bude, a seaside resort town in northeast Cornwall, England, reports the European Space Association (ESA). The stunning sight appeared 36 minutes before the stroke of midnight on January 21, 2020.

    R
    •  
      CommentAuthorgoatcheez
    • CommentTimeFeb 8th 2020