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    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeJun 18th 2020
     
    I did read it, and the weasel "could" stood out. That's why I relied on the original article to answer "You've got hydrogen; what are you going to do with it?"

    No matter how you slice it, the energy density of gaseous hydrogen is pretty low, so more energy to compress it for storage, no matter the source. And it's a devil to handle--leaks out of the smallest cracks.

    I'm convinced that Toyota's hydrogen fuel-cell fleet is mostly for show.
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      CommentAuthoralsetalokin
    • CommentTimeJun 18th 2020 edited
     
    .
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      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeJun 18th 2020
     
    Posted By: alsetalokin.
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      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeJun 18th 2020
     
    ?
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      CommentAuthoralsetalokin
    • CommentTimeJun 19th 2020 edited
     
    Posted By: Trim?


    It's an H+ ion.

    Or a dot, one or the other.

    Beware the naked proton, for it shall devour thee.
    • CommentAuthortinker
    • CommentTimeJun 24th 2020 edited
     
    Posted By: AsterixAnother example of unsustainable inefficiency. It takes a lot of electricity to produce metallic alumium-- far more than you get by hyrolizing the metal.


    All aluminium is not readily re-smelted, in fact a lot of low-grade stuff takes 3 melts to make a decent ingot and a fourth to make a product. I have people begging me to take this stuff away rather than see it landfilled. There's the story the recyclers and manufacturers tell, and then there's the real story. They are very different.

    Here's more info on turning scrap into energy...

    https://netzerochem.com/#page-top
    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeJun 24th 2020
     
    According to US EPA numbers, we still landfill a lot of aluminum. I suspect that's mainly due to the inability to efficiently separate aluminum from the waste stream. But you'll grant that making aluminum from bauxite requires a heckuva lot more energy than processing recycled stock. I wonder what part of a Ford aluminum-body truck or a Tesla is economically recyclable.

    Steel still is king in recycling, probably due to magnetic separation.
    • CommentAuthortinker
    • CommentTimeJun 24th 2020 edited
     
    Thank for the link above on EPA landfill figures for Aluminium 2M+ tons a year landfilled in 2017 is pretty disgraceful.

    Part of this problem is because of the low-value of small particle scrap - the kind my process uses best. Using it to make hydrogen and alumina adds value and incentivises recycling. If made into hydrogen and aluminium tri-hydrate it would provide as much energy as 200M kg of gasoline and produce 6M tons of alumina, which in turn would save strip-mining bauxite to the tune of 12M tons (even good bauxite is only 50% alumina).
    • CommentAuthortinker
    • CommentTimeJul 6th 2020
     
    Which is better (or worse) a look at the arguments.



    https://netzerochem.com/batteries-or-fuel-cells/
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      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeJul 6th 2020
     
    Nice posts Tink thanks.
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      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeJul 6th 2020
     
    Windmills have to be stopped at times when they are producing to much energy, modify the systems so they produce carbon neutral gasoline, hydrogen or to recycle waste should be planned for.
    • CommentAuthortinker
    • CommentTimeJul 6th 2020
     
    I agree. Spare energy should be stored somehow, we should 'live clean'. But it is not considered to be readily investable. The old story.
    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeJul 6th 2020
     
    The problem with Hâ‚‚ is that it's slippery stuff. It embrittles steel pipes and can sneak through the tiniest of holes. I wonder how much would be lost in an industrial situation.
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    Electrons seem to be the safer bet
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      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeSep 17th 2020
     
    Use for the waste water of hydrogen trains?

    Water-Trak aims for better adhesion on rails.

    https://www.theengineer.co.uk/water-trak-rail-cocatalyst/
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      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeOct 10th 2020
     
    Development of cost-efficient electrocatalyst for hydrogen production.

    https://phys.org/news/2020-10-cost-efficient-electrocatalyst-hydrogen-production.html
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      CommentAuthoraber0der
    • CommentTimeOct 10th 2020
     
    Hydrogen fool-cell buses are louder than diesels.
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeOct 10th 2020
     
    I have not (yet) heard that noise contributes to climate change.
    • CommentAuthorBigOilRep
    • CommentTimeOct 10th 2020
     
    Posted By: aber0derHydrogen fool-cell buses are louder than diesels.

    The ones in London certainly aren't. Where you getting this from?
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      CommentAuthoraber0der
    • CommentTimeOct 10th 2020
     
    Posted By: BigOilRepWhere you getting this from?

    Personal experience. Of course I didn't take measurements etc..
    They sound louder.
    https://youtu.be/Mm7o61OQg2w