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      CommentAuthorgoatcheez
    • CommentTimeMay 30th 2019
     
    +2
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      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeJun 3rd 2019
     
    Massive Jupiter, Mercury meets Mars and ‘Solstice Sun’ – the rare space events you can see in June 2019.

    https://www.thesun.co.uk/tech/9211497/space-events-june-2019-astronomy-guide/
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      CommentAuthoroak
    • CommentTimeJun 3rd 2019 edited
     
    On this evening in June [June 10], Jupiter will be the biggest and brightest that it will ever be for the whole of 2019.

    This is because the large planet will be directly opposite the Sun from our perspective so it will be lit up and visible all day long.
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      CommentAuthoralsetalokin
    • CommentTimeJun 3rd 2019 edited
     
    Naturally these events occur during the time of year when my skies are largely overcast. So even if Jupiter were somehow visible during the daytime at opposition... I wouldn't be able to see it.

    Jupiter can actually be seen during the day, sometimes, if you know where (and when) to look.
    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeJun 3rd 2019
     
    Probably not at the ground--it's even difficult to see the sun.
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    Sometimes pointers are helpful. Like a low-cut dress.
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      CommentAuthoroak
    • CommentTimeJun 4th 2019
     
    The big mystery is what is causing the anomalous behavior that is hypothetically attributed to dark matter. That an apparent aberration from that anomalous behavior (an anomaly in the anomaly), turns out not to exist, is itself an interesting clue.
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeJun 4th 2019
     
    Let me see if I have got this straight. We have a false report of an anomaly in the anomalous behaviour of galaxies. If we are always talking about the same anomaly, we have NOT(NOT(NOT anomalous))), which seems to multiply out to NOT ANOMALOUS. So galaxies behave as expected, as proven by this weird result.
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    There is the expected unexpected, and then there is the unexpected unexpected....
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      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeJun 4th 2019
     
    Should we stop going to Mars if we find life?

    Mars: The box seeking to answer the biggest question.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-20323384
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    I want to see the microscopes
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    Posted By: Andrew PalfreymanELF
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e72V3iV4Rms


    I can't find it at the moment but did you see the article about the millisecond pulsars in the globular cluster Terzan 5?

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    Seems 21 were known back in 2005.
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    I think Terzan 5 is an ancient galactic community and the pulsars we detect are somehow involved with their megastructure civilization.

    Or maybe it's just a statistical anomaly.


    Or maybe those are the same thing.
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    I mean.... look at the proportion of ms pulsars in Terzan 5. And consider that all of those are narrow-beam transmitters with whirling antennae that just happen to include old Sol in the conical beam pattern.

    It's a conspiracy of alien distress beacons, or maybe the Terzan 5 Neighbourhood Watch Network gossiping away.


    Or there are just so frigging many naturally formed msps in globular clusters in general that it's no anomaly at all that many of their beams transit our radio telescopes.

    Either way it's pretty weird.
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    When you've been travelling through space as long as I have, you learn to take things like this in your stride.
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      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeJun 4th 2019
     
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      CommentAuthorDuracell
    • CommentTimeJun 4th 2019
     
    Posted By: alsetalokinI mean.... look at the proportion of ms pulsars in Terzan 5. And consider that all of those are narrow-beam transmitters with whirling antennae that just happen to include old Sol in the conical beam pattern.

    It's a conspiracy of alien distress beacons, or maybe the Terzan 5 Neighbourhood Watch Network gossiping away.


    Or there are just so frigging many naturally formed msps in globular clusters in general that it's no anomaly at all that many of their beams transit our radio telescopes.

    Either way it's pretty weird.
    They’re just some of the quarantine beacons that the ancient ones put in place to create the old sol exclusion zone ...