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  1.  
    This is ... bad.

    https://earthsky.org/space/effect-on-astronomy-spacex-starlink-satellites

    And it is going to be horrible. We have already seen how satellites can mess up astrophotos in my own imaging work. and these things are going to be all over the sky. There are going to be a lot of very angry and dismayed astrophotographers. Me, for one.

    I wonder how many of them drive Teslas.
    •  
      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeJun 5th 2019
     
    A small price to pay, surely, for improved worldwide access to porn?
    •  
      CommentAuthoraber0der
    • CommentTimeJun 5th 2019
     
    One more incentive to relocate to Mars.
  2.  
    The idea is to deploy them there too.

    Elon's vision, you see.
    •  
      CommentAuthoraber0der
    • CommentTimeJun 5th 2019
     
    Yeah, Mars is a huge market for ISPs.
  3.  
    Early adopter first mover advantage
    •  
      CommentAuthoraber0der
    • CommentTimeJun 5th 2019
     
    Irony, I hope...
    • CommentAuthorkorkskrew
    • CommentTimeJun 6th 2019 edited
     
    There a couple mitigating factors to consider. Musk has directed his Starlink team to reduce the albedo of the satellites. The satellites are in a low enough orbit that they only reflect the sun near dusk and dawn. Not times you would be doing astronomy that requires minimal interference, and reflection from ground sources will be minimized by the reduction in albedo.

    I don't think it will matter much for most astronomy. Just what's being done at dawn and dusk, the those folks are already dealing with all the space-junk, so Starlink will increase the problem, but by less than an order of magnitude.

    ETA: It also isn't clear yet how bright these will actually be. They are not yet in their final orientation (antennas on the bottom, and solar arrays on top), and they are not yet at their final operating altitude. They will be almost twice as high as now for their normal operation.
  4.  
    I enjoy seeing people squirm at Musk's latest success.
  5.  
    Posted By: korkskrewI don't think it will matter much for most astronomy. Just what's being done at dawn and dusk, the those folks are already dealing with all the space-junk, so Starlink will increase the problem, but by less than an order of magnitude.


    Done much astrophotography, have you?
    • CommentAuthorkorkskrew
    • CommentTimeJun 6th 2019
     
    No, but I'll bet that Starlink will be the least of your troubles.
    •  
      CommentAuthoralsetalokin
    • CommentTimeJun 6th 2019 edited
     
    You are probably right, because the weather around here is less and less astro-friendly, not to mention the proliferation of brilliant LED streetlights for which my notch filter has the wrong notch wavelengths.

    However I've already imaged satellites in geosynch orbit late at night several times. Musk's won't be that high. Certainly nobody painted these particular ones flat black... and whether or not you count a streak across an image a defect is in the eye of the beholder. I might say "Dammit, hours of imaging and processing the Dumbbell, on a rare clear moonless night, lost because of a damned satellite trace" while Musk might say "You captured my beautiful satellites quite well, but what's that greenish blob in the background?"

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cycLZQtM8HU

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q_DhmfrSq54
  6.  
    Why not wait until orbits and attitudes are finalised before going off?
    •  
      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeJun 6th 2019
     
    Bound to be worse, but the needs of the many, buggers up the one.
    •  
      CommentAuthoralsetalokin
    • CommentTimeJun 6th 2019 edited
     
    Posted By: Andrew PalfreymanWhy not wait until orbits and attitudes are finalised before going off?

    Because they are going to be all over the sky, at all declinations! And if you think they are going to be even higher than the geosynch orbit... I have to ask... why?

    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeJun 6th 2019
     
    Clearly what you need to do is to put them into tunnels.
    •  
      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeJun 6th 2019
     
    On lamp posts.
  7.  
    And as far as albedo reduction goes.... Lunar albedo averages about 0.12, which is in the range of typical asphalt, or flat black paint. Yet look at how bright is the illuminated surface of the moon. Imagine a million little tiny bits of the moon moving around all across the sky.
    • CommentAuthorloreman
    • CommentTimeJun 7th 2019
     
    • CommentAuthorkorkskrew
    • CommentTimeJun 7th 2019
     
    Posted By: alsetalokin... And if you think they are going to be even higher than the geosynch orbit... I have to ask... why?
    The first batch of 6k satellites will be in LEO. 470 to 512 miles up. There will be two other sets less populated but higher.