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      CommentAuthorDuracell
    • CommentTimeJan 14th 2020
     
    Posted By: AngusWould we then be justified in saying there that there is some understanding of Nature that is not worth having?
    ISTR that we already did e.g.: with the results of some of the experiments that were carried out in Nazi Concentration Camps. Of course some nascent global pharma megacorps subsequently decided to subsequently ignore that decision...
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    "Curiosity killed the cat" as they say. Some information, no matter how much it is worth, simply costs too much.
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    Some website just offered to charge me a dollar to look up a phone number. It simply cost too much.
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeJan 14th 2020
     
    Two interesting answers. The Nazi medical knowledge was obtained in morally indefensible ways, but such knowledge is certainly worth knowing and I believe has been used beneficially, if very secretly.

    The cost of obtaining information, of course, moral or financial, is a serious consideration. Returning to the satellite question, we have already paid the financial cost of some very capable earth based telescopes with performance that cannot presently be duplicated by space-based telescopes. If the information they can obtain from the ground is lost because a collection of fifth magnitude blobs keep passing through their fields, then there are things we will not know about the sky for a very long time. That is, until we can put up a lot of highly upgraded Hubble telescopes in orbit or on the moon. Incurring a new, huge, unnecessary outlay. If we can ever get them up through the snowstorm of commercial mini-satellites, that is.
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      CommentAuthoroak
    • CommentTimeJan 14th 2020 edited
     
    Posted By: alsetalokin"Curiosity killed the cat" as they say. Some information, no matter how much it is worth, simply costs too much.

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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeJan 14th 2020
     
    Ha!
    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeJan 14th 2020
     
    So the moral of this is that humans should not eat of the Tree of Knowledge.

    Feels like many are heeding the commandment already.
    • CommentAuthorloreman
    • CommentTimeJan 14th 2020
     
    Some of them are actually spitting it out.
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    +5 Ha!
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      CommentAuthorgoatcheez
    • CommentTimeJan 15th 2020
     
    He's no Dr Manhattan with those leaves.
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      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeJan 18th 2020
     
    https://futurism.com/the-byte/giant-star-betelgeuse-eaten-smaller-companion


    If/when Betelgeuse goes supernova it is assumed that any neutron star beam left from the explosion would not be pointed anywhere near earth but such a vast explosion could easily tilt the axis of the remaining neutron star to somewhere pointing near us.

    Gulp!
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    Counting oxygen planets, before the telescope is even launched?
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeJan 19th 2020
     
    Hub-ris
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      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeJan 20th 2020
     
    Hope we find some oxygen on a Goldilocks planet orbiting around a Goldilocks star.

    Within twenty light years.
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      CommentAuthorgoatcheez
    • CommentTimeJan 29th 2020
     
    Just why are they building those internet satellites and ruining astronomy?

    How new internet-beaming satellites could change wars

    https://www.axios.com/internet-beaming-satellites-wars-air-force-166ad846-b3ee-4932-87c1-97e7522f4235.html
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    https://www.theregister.co.uk/2020/02/06/space_comms_revolution_starlink_aws/

    Here's an idea which I attribute to Trim. To get the irate astronomers off Elon's back, equip each Starlink satellite with a small telescope and devote a small fraction of the downlink bandwidth to it. Many variants are possible, limited only by your imaginations, dear trappers.
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      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeFeb 7th 2020
     
    Actually some of the smartphone camera's are amazingly good, put the best ones on starlink satellites and my strange idea might do some good.
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeFeb 7th 2020 edited
     
    Posted By: Andrew Palfreymansmall telescope


    Gee thanks. We already have small telescopes in orbit. What is important is BIG telescopes with active correction for atmospheric distortion. These things now outperform Hubble. The muskmist will blind them. Perhaps we will be better able to fight each other as a result, but it begins to resemble a cultural locked-in syndrome.
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeFeb 7th 2020
     
    In years gone by anybody wanting to advertise something only needed to rent roadside space from some farmer and put up a billboard by the highway. As time went on everybody got tired of looking at them and in the more enlightened jurisdictions roadside billboards were banned. The muskmist is being put up on the same basis - anybody with the cash can put up junk in space for his own purposes. Unfortunately the high-orbit ones will not rot away as fast as abandoned billboards.