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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeJul 23rd 2020 edited
     
    My analysis shows that it may not.
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeJul 23rd 2020
     
    Hmm. I see a problem with the Terrorscope. It gets you a large aperture for resolution purposes but it uses only a tiny fraction of it for light gathering..
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      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeJul 23rd 2020
     
    How terrible.
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    But the optical gain seems not half bad, at around 40k. Still, no comparison to the awesome gravscope at 1011
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeJul 23rd 2020
     
    Optical gain? The only way to get optical gain is with a lasing medium.
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    Amplification
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeJul 23rd 2020 edited
     
    Exactly what I said. You can't amplify light in a linear process, which is what refraction is.

    The brightness theorem.
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    Magnification
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeJul 23rd 2020 edited
     
    A dIfferent thing. We must say what we mean.

    Only a thin annulus of the wavefront is being focussed, so it doesn't gather light the way a normal telescope does. The highly magnified image is going to be very dim by comparison with an earth-sized aperture. This is a problem with both the gravitational and the atmospheric lens. Still, it's a neat idea.

    The solution proposed to the problem I mentioned before (that the ring shaped "image" is not a picture of the object) is to look only at one pixel at a time, and integrate all the light in that image-of-a-pixel. That means the image resolution depends both on the normal resolution of the telescope and the pointing accuracy. I'd like to see that one worked out on an existing orbital telescope before spending a bajillion dollars on the Terrorscope.

    Just for fun, consider the light gathering capability of an f=120 lens with a 20dB ND filter in front of it.
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    Remember when I first introduced you to the gravscope and asked about the best way to decode the image? You were extremely sceptical at the time.
    Posted By: AngusThat means the image resolution depends both on the normal resolution of the telescope and the pointing accuracy.

    I don't think the latter plays a role so much as does the navigational accuracy. That's because the telescope is sitting wholly within the image. From graphs in the paper, it seems that 20 cm either way makes a huge difference. That's pretty awesome location ability at 550+ AU out.
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeJul 24th 2020 edited
     
    In case you missed it, I am still extremely skeptical.

    The 20 cm absolute location error requirementt in a structure at million km scale supports my skepticism.
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      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeJul 24th 2020
     
    Wow! An Actual Picture of Multiple Planets Orbiting a Sunlike Star.

    https://www.universetoday.com/147134/wow-an-actual-picture-of-multiple-planets-orbiting-a-sunlike-star/
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeJul 24th 2020
     
    Amazing.
    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeJul 26th 2020
     
    My lovely wife and I went out tonight to have a look at Neowise. We live in the country, so visibility is usually very good. We used Ursa Major as a visual guide; looking slightly below it; more or less on a line drawn downwards through the two stars forming the edge of the cup nearest the handle.(Megrez and Phad). About 2200 PDT. Very clear night tonight; foreshadows the next couple of days being stinking hot.

    Used my 10x50 binocs; found it--a dot with schmutz. Underwhelmed.

    Well, Hale-Bopp it ain't. You could see that one from a lighted parking lot in the city. But we saw Neowise; never did see Kohoutek back when.
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeJul 26th 2020
     
    Currently sitting on boat in good dark anchorage. It's there - just mag 2 but pretty.
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    Hurricane skies hereabouts. Great views of the comet -- on the internet.
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      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeJul 29th 2020
     
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      CommentAuthoralsetalokin
    • CommentTimeJul 29th 2020 edited
     
    Things made a lot more sense when there _was_ a Planet Nine, and it was called Pluto. You know, that rock ball way out there that is spherical, has an atmosphere and seasons and even a moon of its own. It was even originally located because it perturbs the orbits of other planets closer in.
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    Half the universe was missing... until now
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kp_kqamkYpw
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