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      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeNov 6th 2013
     
    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeNov 7th 2013
     
    Well, heck, they already do:

    Run your car on used soda cans and lye
    • CommentAuthorjoshs
    • CommentTimeNov 7th 2013
     
    The lye acts as a catalyst. The aluminum reduces the water.
    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeNov 7th 2013
     
    Posted By: joshsThe lye acts as a catalyst. The aluminum reduces the water.


    As sodium enters the reaction to get around the problem of the oxide layer, I don't like the word catalyst. I prefer the word "promoter", as used in this paper:

    http://www1.eere.energy.gov/hydrogenandfuelcells/pdfs/aluminium_water_hydrogen.pdf

    Note also, that there is some sodium aluminate formed.

    At any rate, the idea of using aluminum as energy storage has been studied.

    A common freshman-class demo is to take a hunk of aluminum and place it in a container filled partway with mercury and the remainder with hot water (boiled to release any dissolved oxygen). The aluminum block is submerged below the mercury and scratched with a tool and then raised into the water. Hydrogen bubbles can be observed coming from the scratched area.

    Lye used to be one way of getting a nice fine-grain matte finish on machined aluminum or magnesium pieces. Ventilation is essential.
    • CommentAuthortinker
    • CommentTimeNov 7th 2013
     
    I still use Caustic Soda for frosting Aluminium -it works very well. I made a bunch of Aluminium moons for an interior decorator many years ago. Random splashes of hot wax onto metal discs, etched afterwards with caustic and then polished the highlights. He was delighted, paid me very well for what turned out to be an afternoons work.

    Also provides a very good (and thrifty) way of making hydrogen balloons from those big and very thin plastic garment bags.
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      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeNov 20th 2013
     
    Po

    More on using Aluminum for hydrogen storage.

    New aluminum alloy stores hydrogen.

    http://phys.org/news/2013-11-aluminum-alloy-hydrogen.html#nRlv
    • CommentAuthorjoshs
    • CommentTimeNov 21st 2013
     
    That's yet another breakthrough announcement in PO that isn't.
  1.  
    Ti is a far better choice.
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      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeDec 9th 2013 edited
     
    Po

    Downside could take up to fifty years to power cars via fuel cells.

    New formula for fast, abundant hydrogen production may help power fuel cells.

    http://phys.org/news/2013-12-formula-fast-abundant-hydrogen-production.html
    • CommentAuthorjoshs
    • CommentTimeDec 9th 2013
     
    Freaking aluminum.
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      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeDec 16th 2013
     
    Po

    New catalyst for fuel cells a potential substitute for platinum.

    http://phys.org/news/2013-12-catalyst-fuel-cells-potential-substitute.html
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      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeMay 22nd 2014
     
    NW


    Europe and Korea's nanotechnology boost to the hydrogen economy.

    http://www.nanowerk.com/nanotechnology-news/newsid=35690.php
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      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeAug 16th 2014
     
    Po

    Why the hydrogen fuel cell vehicle rollout may now succeed.

    http://phys.org/news/2014-08-hydrogen-fuel-cell-vehicle-rollout.html
  2.  
    Posted By: Trimthe hydrogen economy.
    that
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      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeAug 22nd 2014
     
    NW

    Nanotechnology engineering produces a water splitter that runs on an ordinary AAA battery

    http://www.nanowerk.com/nanotechnology-news/newsid=37052.php
  3.  
    Nice one!
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeAug 23rd 2014
     
    Er- wouldn't it be more efficient just to run your car on the AAA battery?
  4.  
    FFS
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      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeNov 26th 2014
     
    Po

    Wow! Power from air, who would have believed it?

    Protons fuel graphene prospects.

    http://phys.org/news/2014-11-protons-fuel-graphene-prospects.html
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    "Because graphene can be produced these days in square metre sheets"
    Also wow - news to me. How does one stitch two of these together, I wonder?