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    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeSep 15th 2018
     
    I'm out of ideas on this one. I have a rather expensive Baldor DC motor that, years ago, has had an extension shaft attached with a metal finishing wheel. I'd like to get the arbor pulled off. It was secured with 2 grubscrews to the shaft, making sure that the flat of the shaft was used to bed said grubscrews. Here's no corrosion anywhere and the grubscrews unscrew easily. But the shaft won't come off. I've tried penetrating oil, heat and gentle tapping with a copper mallet. Nothing works. At this point, I'm wondering if I should just hacksaw a slot in the arbor and pry it open and off the shaft. That would be a shame because it's a nicely machined left-hand arbor.

    Any suggestions? (the end of the motor shaft is complete covered by the arbor, so I can't use a bearing puller).

    Oh--the motor shaft is 5/8" diameter.
  1.  
    Hmmm..... perhaps the arbor isn't pressed on but rather is screwed on to male threads on the end of the shaft. Then the setscrews would be there to prevent unscrewing. It's the blind hole for the shaft that makes me suspicious.
    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeSep 15th 2018
     
    No, the motor shaft is smooth with a flat. I oughta know--I attached the arbor about 15 years ago...

    The arbor extension looks like this:

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      CommentAuthoralsetalokin
    • CommentTimeSep 15th 2018 edited
     
    Well, all that's left then, without destroying stuff, is more heat, more penetrant, cycles of heat and cold (dry ice).
    See if you can find a penetrating oil called "S'OK".

    ETA: Presumably the arbor stud is itself screwed into the body? Can it be unscrewed?
    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeSep 15th 2018
     
    No--it appears to be turned from a solid round of steel.

    I'm using something from CRC Powerlube 05005--it's been a pretty good penetrant. I could also try kerosene, but there's no rust here that I can see.

    https://www.amazon.com/CRC-05005-Power-Lube-Multi-Purpose-Lubricant/dp/B000BXMF8Q
  2.  
    Well... if it's not for sale on Catalina Island.... I don't know what to say.
    •  
      CommentAuthoraber0der
    • CommentTimeSep 15th 2018
     
    I would put the motor in a freezer over night before applying the next heatwave.
    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeSep 15th 2018
     
    My current plan is to support the motor and shaft and place the arbor on my workshop anvil and start hammering on it to expand it slightly (deformation) and break it loose. The arbor should still be useful and the motor shaft and bearings should come through unscathed.
    •  
      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeSep 15th 2018
     
    Interesting approach. Let us know.
    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeSep 15th 2018
     
    It verked! Supported the motor such that only the arbor was resting on the anvil horn, took my 32 oz ball-peen and went tappy-tap-tap on the arbor and pretty soon it started moving. Pulled it off and it's none the worse for wear.
    •  
      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeSep 15th 2018
     
    Great!
  3.  
    Generations of dead blacksmiths silently applaud.
    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeSep 16th 2018
     
    On a lark, I tried it on another stuck shaft that I haven't been able to budge for years. Five minutes of tappy-tap-tap and it's free also. Heat, penetrating oil and a flywheel puller couldn't budge it. I think things come loose because steel is normally pretty elastic (i.e. it'll flex without deforming permanently)

    I think that the same could be accomplished where an anvil wasn't handy or practical using a large hammer (say a single-jack sledge) as a backing iron.

    Something to put into this old fool's bag of tricks.
    •  
      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeSep 16th 2018
     
    You learn something every day on the 'trap. Good going!