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      CommentAuthorgoatcheez
    • CommentTimeMar 26th 2021
     
    SN11 Flight Termination System safety pin is being removed.
  1.  
    Do they ask for volunteers for that job?
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      CommentAuthorgoatcheez
    • CommentTimeMar 26th 2021
     
    Scrubbed due to fog. You can't even see the nosecone. Rolled in like it does over the hill in San Jose, CA. Maybe tomorrow, weather permitting.
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      CommentAuthoraber0der
    • CommentTimeMar 26th 2021
     
    Oh scrub!
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      CommentAuthoraber0der
    • CommentTimeMar 27th 2021 edited
     
    Click here

    As early as Monday, March 29, the SpaceX team will attempt a high-altitude flight test of Starship serial number 11 (SN11) – our fourth high-altitude flight test of a Starship prototype from Starbase in Texas. Similar to previous high-altitude flight tests of Starship, SN11 will be powered through ascent by three Raptor engines, each shutting down in sequence prior to the vehicle reaching apogee – approximately 10 km in altitude. SN11 will perform a propellant transition to the internal header tanks, which hold landing propellant, before reorienting itself for reentry and a controlled aerodynamic descent.

    The Starship prototype will descend under active aerodynamic control, accomplished by independent movement of two forward and two aft flaps on the vehicle. All four flaps are actuated by an onboard flight computer to control Starship’s attitude during flight and enable precise landing at the intended location. SN11’s Raptor engines will then reignite as the vehicle attempts a landing flip maneuver immediately before touching down on the landing pad adjacent to the launch mount.

    A controlled aerodynamic descent with body flaps and vertical landing capability, combined with in-space refilling, are critical to landing Starship at destinations across the solar system where prepared surfaces or runways do not exist, and returning to Earth. This capability will enable a fully reusable transportation system designed to carry both crew and cargo on long-duration, interplanetary flights and help humanity return to the Moon, and travel to Mars and beyond.

    There will be a live feed of the flight test available here that will start a few minutes prior to liftoff. Given the dynamic schedule of development testing, stay tuned to our social media channels for updates as we move toward SpaceX’s fourth high-altitude flight test of Starship!
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      CommentAuthoraber0der
    • CommentTimeMar 27th 2021
     
    Cuckmate, criticisors!
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      CommentAuthoraber0der
    • CommentTimeMar 28th 2021 edited
     
    FFD; Apple-V:
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      CommentAuthoraber0der
    • CommentTimeMar 28th 2021
     
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      CommentAuthoraber0der
    • CommentTimeMar 28th 2021
     
    (do you also, too, get treated with wago schaltschrankbau advertisements?)
    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeMar 28th 2021
     
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      CommentAuthoraber0der
    • CommentTimeMar 28th 2021
     
    My Wago Corona Kronleuchter:

    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeMar 28th 2021 edited
     
    Wagos are uncommon in the US; I'm not sure of their use is approved by the National Electrical Code.

    We use these instead--which is perhaps worse:

    There's a really nasty type, called a "purple twister"


    Filled with dielectric grease; made for connecting copper to aluminum wire.
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeMar 28th 2021
     
    Those are called "Marrets" around here, but I think not in the 'States. What do you call them?
    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeMar 28th 2021 edited
     
    Commonly known as "wire nuts".

    Wagos are not allowed in some US jurisdictions because, like "push in" receptacles, the contact area is small and the wire can easily be twisted out. Wire nuts tightly twist several wires together over a large contact area; the down-side is that the wire end is twisted and work-hardened.

    "Quick wire" push-in terminals became popular in the 70s and 80s because they were simple and quick to use, particularly for the DIYer example. Push in terminals are frowned upon by professionals, preferring the screw terminal type, preferably with a clamping plate. However, it's easy for the novice to get the screw-terminal type wrong (e.g. not wrapping the bare wire end completely around the screw or wrapping in the wrong direction.. You'll note that with the push-in receptacles that the ground wire is always screw terminal. Sometimes safety matters.
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeMar 28th 2021
     
    I dislike the push-in type because they can be difficult to get out for replacement. Most of the ones I see can be installed either way.
    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeMar 28th 2021
     
    Usually, the push-in terminals have a slot for insertion of a small flat screwdriver blade to release the spring so that the conductors can be easily pulled out. Newer push-in-models are designed not to take AWG12 wire, as the springs aren't up to the job. Commercial-rated receptacles do not have push-in terminals.
  2.  
    BN3 components spotted. So 3 boosters and about 5 starships (I've lost track) are being simultaneously worked.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IUZWR6pkK7A
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      CommentAuthorgoatcheez
    • CommentTimeMar 29th 2021 edited
     
    Elon reports that the FAA inspector could not make it to the launch site on time today so the test launch is postponed. Weather is not likely conducive for testing tomorrow. <sigh> SN11 lives another day.
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    After having had the entire weekend to prepare. *sigh*
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      CommentAuthoraber0der
    • CommentTimeMar 30th 2021
     
    And after waiting the entire week before for spx to get their launch together.
    Scrub, scrub, scrub, Pferdchen läuft Gallop.