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      CommentAuthorgoatcheez
    • CommentTimeMar 5th 2020
     
    The psychology of face touching and how to stop.

    Face touching can help us deal with anxiety and discomfort, and may be comforting, the report said. We might think we want to touch our faces because of a perceived itch or to groom ourselves, but research suggests we're actually doing it because we're somehow uneasy or unsettled, according to research described in the study.

    Touching our faces is also thought to be a way we might try to avoid being distracted. In a study of face touching, researchers concocted ways of trying to distract study participants during a difficult mental task, and found that the human test subjects increasingly touched their faces when their attention was distracted and they needed to refocus.
    https://www.msn.com/en-us/health/medical/a-coronavirus-danger-touching-your-face-here-is-how-to-stop-doing-it/ar-BB10JGKl
  1.  
    But how else is one to remind oneself of one's finely chiseled features?
    • CommentAuthorloreman
    • CommentTimeMar 5th 2020
     
    Employ someone to do it.
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    Right out of primate ethology. The "muzzle wipe", coded MW, is commonly seen as displaced aggression or sometimes frustration.
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      CommentAuthorgoatcheez
    • CommentTimeMar 5th 2020
     
    And then there's the proverbial face palm.
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      CommentAuthorgoatcheez
    • CommentTimeMar 7th 2020
     
    How to not touch your face

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      CommentAuthoraber0der
    • CommentTimeMar 7th 2020
     
    Bathe you're hand's in Heinz Ketchup. Done.

    5 second crafts dot con.
    •  
      CommentAuthoralsetalokin
    • CommentTimeMar 7th 2020 edited
     
    It's a bat virus, not a skunk virus. (Not a stinkycat, but a flittermouse.)

    Try garlic sauce instead.
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      CommentAuthorSwissie
    • CommentTimeMar 7th 2020
     
    Wear Batman gloves. It‘s logical!
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      CommentAuthorterry1094
    • CommentTimeMar 25th 2020 edited
     
    In "Star Trek: Picard" when asked what book he was reading, Cristobal Rios responded that it was about "the philosophical implications of the existential pain of living with the consciousness of death." This is that book:

    Tragic Sense Of Life, by Miguel de Unamuno

    Free from the Gutenberg Press

    And timely.

    ETA: Published the year of my birth. :)

    I am a man; nothing human is alien to me.
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      CommentAuthorgoatcheez
    • CommentTimeApr 26th 2020
     
    The supra-liminal mind refers to those elements of our consciousness that we are fully aware of in our day-to-day waking state – our everyday stream of consciousness. The sub-liminal mind, by contrast, bubbles away just below the surface of our awareness, occasionally intruding above the threshold of consciousness in the form of extraordinary experiences of various kinds – from moments of inspiration to dreams, reveries, apparitions and possession experiences.
    https://gothicnaturejournal.com/gothic-psychology-the-ecological-unconscious/
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeApr 26th 2020
     
    Sublime.
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      CommentAuthorgoatcheez
    • CommentTimeMay 17th 2020
     
    The information universe winks at you.

    Your friend told you about that obscure bluegrass-electro-punk band yesterday morning. That afternoon, you ran across one of their albums at a garage sale. Wait a minute—that’s them in that Doritos commercial, too! Coincidence ... or conspiracy? More likely, you’re experiencing “frequency illusion,” somewhat better known as the Baader-Meinhof phenomenon.
    https://psmag.com/social-justice/theres-a-name-for-that-the-baader-meinhof-phenomenon-59670

    How disappointing. :(
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      CommentAuthoroak
    • CommentTimeMay 18th 2020 edited
     
    Also known as solid conclusive evidence that we live in a not-quite-perfectly rendered simulation.
  3.  
    sonoboy! you're back!!
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      CommentAuthoroak
    • CommentTimeMay 18th 2020
     
    I'm channeling. (The simulation lets me do it.)
    •  
      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeMay 18th 2020
     
    Any progress on the carapaces, I wonder? Sonoboy?
    •  
      CommentAuthorgoatcheez
    • CommentTimeMay 19th 2020
     
    In 1999, the US broadcaster ABC commissioned a pilot for a new TV series set in Los Angeles. It starts with a brunette emerging from a car crash. There’s $125,000 in her bag, but she has no memory of who she is or where she was going.

    Anyone hoping for a standard story arc to unfold at this point would have been disappointed. Many scenes are left unresolved and seem disconnected. And there are eerie, fantastical elements, such as the appearances of a dwarf with oversized prosthetic arms and a tiny head, and an enigmatic cowboy who is totally at odds with the film’s setting in modern Hollywood.

    Although the network dropped the series before it aired, the director turned the pilot into a feature film that enjoyed a worldwide release. He had not resolved all its incongruities, however, with one critic of the film complaining that ‘nothing makes any sense … There’s no purpose or logic to events.’ Salon spent a large portion of their review asking: ‘What the fuck is going on in this movie?’

    Yet today, David Lynch’s Mulholland Drive (2001) is considered one of the best films of the 21st century (appearing at the top of a poll by BBC Culture in 2016) – and the very elements that bewildered some critics are considered part of the film’s genius.

    Many works of art deliberately challenge our understanding of the world in this way, including other films by Lynch, the writing of Franz Kafka and the humour of Monty Python, to name but a few. All feature illogical and incongruous elements and the uncanny juxtaposed with the familiar.

    Clues to the appeal of this kind of art come from recent work by psychologists, who are beginning to understand the strange effects it can have on the brain. According to research on the ‘meaning maintenance model’ of human reasoning, surreal and absurd art can be so unsettling that the brain reacts as if it is feeling physical pain, yet it ultimately leads us to reaffirm who we are, and sharpens the mind as we look for new ways to make sense of the world. The findings also suggest new ways to improve education, and even help to explain our responses to some of the more absurd political events of recent years.

    The meaning maintenance model was first proposed by three psychologists – Steven Heine, Travis Proulx and Kathleen Vohs – in 2006. They were inspired by the French-Algerian philosopher Albert Camus, who argued that the human mind continuously attempts to construct a view of reality as a single, coherent whole – an urge he described in The Myth of Sisyphus (1942) as ‘nostalgia for unity’.

    Heine and his team proposed that our mental representation of the world is like a delicate web of interconnected beliefs, documenting the relations between ourselves and the people, places and objects around us. When we are confronted with an apparently inexplicable event that appears to break that framework, we feel profound uncertainty – the ‘feeling of the absurd’.

    Using these ideas as a launch board, the psychologists described three ways in which the mind might mitigate that feeling. The most drastic would involve building a new mental representation to incorporate the inexplicable event. Alternatively, we could reinterpret the event so that it fits our existing mental model. Or we could strengthen other beliefs and values, even those relating to a completely unconnected domain – a phenomenon that the psychologists described as ‘fluid compensation’. This involves ‘retreating to a safe place where the world makes sense again’, Heine told me.
    https://psyche.co/ideas/a-touch-of-absurdity-can-help-to-wrap-your-mind-around-reality
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      CommentAuthoralsetalokin
    • CommentTimeMay 19th 2020 edited
     
    Robert Sheckley covered that some time ago, in 1966 IIRC. He called it "metaphoric deformation".


    And some other mystic told me "As a thing is viewed, so it appears."
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      CommentAuthorgoatcheez
    • CommentTimeMay 19th 2020
     
    The world is looking more and more like a Lynch movie every day.