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    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeSep 21st 2019
     
    In the case of Germany, this means buying power from France's nukes?
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      CommentAuthoraber0der
    • CommentTimeSep 21st 2019
     
    'AFAIK DE is a net exporter of electricity.

    But you are right, we rely on the french nukes while finding our way to a carbon free and possibly nuke free energy supply. If I were the supreme reichskanzler of germany, I would probably push harder to that goal, but reality is what it is.
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      CommentAuthoraber0der
    • CommentTimeSep 21st 2019
     
    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeSep 22nd 2019
     
    Yabut--Germany's energy budget is 37% coal and 13% gas-derived.

    Compare this with France, 0.7% and 7.7%.

    Germany has a way to go.
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      CommentAuthorping1400
    • CommentTimeSep 22nd 2019
     
    Posted By: Asterix
    Posted By: ping1400Good science, but stupid economics. Nuclear power can no longer compete with renewables in terms of costs. Maybe useful science for other future purposes like medical applications or power on remote astroids.


    Renewables won't fill the current energy demand. Not even close.


    Neither does nuclear power. And when presented the choice to replace carbon based power production by alternatives, the outcome will be based on the TCO (and time to market). Both are in favor of renewables.

    We have no time left for nuclear technology to become commercially viable. And after that the typical time to bring a new nuke from idea to production is measured in decades. Don Quichot.
    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeSep 22nd 2019 edited
     
    So, how do we get there? cite

    Note that 45% of "renewables" in this report was from biofuels (e.g. corn ethanol), which, in the big picture is not all that "renewable" (i.e. it takes fossil fuels to grow, harvest and process the stuff).

    Note also, that overall energy consumption is increasing.

    I'm interested to hear how we'll generate 100 quads (based on 2018 numbers) from renewables.

    If wishes were horses...
    •  
      CommentAuthoraber0der
    • CommentTimeSep 22nd 2019
     
    Posted By: AsterixYabut--Germany's energy budget is 37% coal and 13% gas-derived.

    Compare this with France, 0.7% and 7.7%.

    Germany has a way to go.


    The coal figure is sadly the work of politicians.

    But to get the full perspective you also have to look at energy consumption per capita.
    •  
      CommentAuthorping1400
    • CommentTimeSep 22nd 2019 edited
     


    Don’t act like the iea, they don’t understand exponential growth. Solar will dominate.
    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeSep 22nd 2019 edited
     
    So how many acres of PV (assuming current average insolation) will it take to provide 100 quads per annum? That's assuming that you've solved the nighttime storage question. 1 quad ~ 293 000 GWh
    •  
      CommentAuthorping1400
    • CommentTimeSep 23rd 2019
     
    10.000.000 ha = 100.000 km2

    Tiny fraction of the Sahara.
    •  
      CommentAuthorping1400
    • CommentTimeSep 23rd 2019 edited
     
    With an anual production already in excess of 100 GWp, and a utilization of 2000 hours (Sahara) per year, we already install almost 1 quad per year in potential solar power.

    Following the historical exponential growth curve, we will pass the 100 quad in yearly solar power production before 2030. In reality the curve will flatten, but we have until 2050 to get rid of carbon based fuel.
    •  
      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeSep 24th 2019 edited
     
    • CommentAuthorBigOilRep
    • CommentTimeSep 25th 2019
     
    Posted By: ping1400
    Posted By: Asterix
    Posted By: ping1400Good science, but stupid economics. Nuclear power can no longer compete with renewables in terms of costs. Maybe useful science for other future purposes like medical applications or power on remote astroids.


    Renewables won't fill the current energy demand. Not even close.


    Neither does nuclear power. And when presented the choice to replace carbon based power production by alternatives, the outcome will be based on the TCO (and time to market). Both are in favor of renewables.

    Someone should tell the Netherlands that then. They are terrible on renewables and currently only generate 6.6% of their energy from them (and 60% of this is biofuels - urgh) - the worst in the EU.

    Every time you charge up your Tesla you're burning a load of fossil fuels.
    •  
      CommentAuthorping1400
    • CommentTimeSep 25th 2019
     
    Yes, shame on the Dutch. Late as always, the curse of having abundant free natural gas for over 50 years.

    But we’re getting there, after Germany the Dutch installed the largest amount of new solar in Europe last year. This year will be even much more.
    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solar_energy_in_the_European_Union

    And about my Tesla. I have over 90m2 of panels at home, charging and driving 100% renewable.
    •  
      CommentAuthorping1400
    • CommentTimeSep 29th 2019
     
    The top 5 European countries with highest EV share of new sold cars in 2019:

    Norway - 45.0%
    Netherlands - 8.9%
    Iceland - 5.8%
    Sweden - 5.0%
    Switzerland - 3.8%

    Just to feel a bit better that The Netherlands are not the worst in all cleantech implementations.
  1.  
    Just curious, seeing Norway so high on the list. How does Tesla handle cabin heat? I understand that the battery has a liquid cooling system. Is waste heat from the battery used to heat the cabin, or do they use a separate electric heater?
    •  
      CommentAuthorDuracell
    • CommentTimeSep 29th 2019
     
    What is Norway doing differently?
  2.  
    Raking the forests?
    •  
      CommentAuthorping1400
    • CommentTimeSep 29th 2019 edited
     
    Posted By: alsetalokinJust curious, seeing Norway so high on the list. How does Tesla handle cabin heat? I understand that the battery has a liquid cooling system. Is waste heat from the battery used to heat the cabin, or do they use a separate electric heater?


    There is a 5kW air vent heater (resistor), but almost just as effective as driver is to wear a jacket and use the seat heater (50 watts) and steering wheel heater (100 watts).

    I hardly use the air heater, only when I have passengers.
    •  
      CommentAuthorping1400
    • CommentTimeSep 29th 2019
     
    Posted By: DuracellWhat is Norway doing differently?


    They tax the hell out of carbon based fuels and put high incentives on electric cars.
    Further it is important to realise Norway produces 100% of its electricity with hydro.