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      CommentAuthorping1400
    • CommentTimeSep 24th 2021
     
    Yes, “normal” prices used to be around 40 Euro/MWh, but now the Chinese are buying all the LNG and the Russians are blackmailing us by reducing spot market gas delivery.
    • CommentAuthorBigOilRep
    • CommentTimeSep 24th 2021 edited
     
    Posted By: ping1400The nuclear countries like FR and BE are the most expensive in Eirope.

    They weren't for 2020 though, France was way cheaper, as it has been for decades. Just picking recent spot prices during a period of market instability isn't exactly indicative. You could call it downright disingenuous....

    Germany also produces a lot more CO2 per capita for it's electricity generation.

    • CommentAuthorkorkskrew
    • CommentTimeSep 24th 2021 edited
     
    If I'm doing the conversions right, my rate works out to something between Latvia and Croatia same as Bulgaria.

    Edited after I rechecked my rates.
    • CommentAuthorBigOilRep
    • CommentTimeSep 24th 2021
     
    Your rate?
    • CommentAuthorkorkskrew
    • CommentTimeSep 24th 2021
     
    euro cents per kWh
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      CommentAuthorping1400
    • CommentTimeSep 24th 2021
     
    @BOR

    These are consumer prices, including all the (emissions) taxes, VAT, grid fees (with local taxes), reseller margins, etc.
    Wholesale prices are more like 4 cents/kWh (thats what large consumers also pay).
    Germany has a lot of consumer taxes, but one of the lowest wholesale market prices (= real production costs).
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeSep 24th 2021 edited
     
    The more meaningful measure for this comparison would be the Grid Emission Factor.

    BC Hydro in my region posts 0.04 kgCO2eq./kWh. Not bad for filthy carbon-spewing Canada. Does anybody have cleaner electricity?
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      CommentAuthorping1400
    • CommentTimeSep 24th 2021 edited
     
    We try.
    We produce over 100% of the electricity at home with our own solar panels. Including consumption of two electric cars, electric cooking, and most of the residential heating with heat pumps.
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      CommentAuthorping1400
    • CommentTimeSep 24th 2021
     
    To compensate for the car batteries I “destroyed” 16 tons of CO2 by taking it out if the ETS market.
    Ou bitcoins are compensated with 100 trees per year (www.treesforall.nl).
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeSep 24th 2021
     
    Posted By: ping1400We try.
    We produce over 100% of the electricity at home with our own solar panels. Including consumption of two electric cars, electric cooking, and most of the residential heating with heat pumps.


    Good for you. But do you enjoy the public benefits of the Dutch economy or do you live alone in the remote bush?
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      CommentAuthorping1400
    • CommentTimeSep 24th 2021
     
    We enjoy all the public benefits and services of our socialist society, where I also pay a shitload of tax for. Without complaints.
    •  
      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeSep 24th 2021 edited
     
    Of course you do. And you have to include your share of the GHG emissions thereof on a per-capita basis.

    Doing the numbers I find that Canada emits 1.7 times more GHG than the Netherlands per capita. Considering the challenges of distance that we face perhaps we need that much slack.
    • CommentAuthorkorkskrew
    • CommentTimeSep 24th 2021 edited
     
    I can't find a per-capita number, but in 2019 my electricity was about 61% coal, and 1% natural gas. 29% is renewable, and the rest is from outside markets, so ill defined.

    ETA: the county I live in is pretty agressive about switching to renewables, so I'm pretty confident the proportion that comes from renewables is increasing at some regular pace.
  1.  
    Same here in Santa Clara County California. The percent renewables increases year on year.
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeSep 25th 2021
     
    Posted By: Andrew PalfreymanSame here in Santa Clara County California. The percent renewables increases year on year.


    Well I can't find the number for SVP, they are a bit cagey about it. Hmmm. Here is another number for a California power company.
    0.295 mT/MWh

    As usual with US units, this is a bit obscure. Normally it is given in TCO2eq/GWh (typically hundreds) or kgCO2eq/kWh (typically tenths).

    If it is supposed to be kg/kWh it is approaching ten times the BC Hydro number.
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      CommentAuthorping1400
    • CommentTimeSep 25th 2021 edited
     
    Posted By: AngusThe more meaningful measure for this comparison would be the Grid Emission Factor.

    BC Hydro in my region posts 0.04 kgCO2eq./kWh. Not bad for filthy carbon-spewing Canada. Does anybody have cleaner electricity?


    The energy sourcing ticket of the largest consumers energy company in NL:



    On group level it is 0,1 kg CO2/kWh
    For residential consumers it is 0,0.

    Wind=wind, zon=solar, waterkracht=hydro, biomassa=biomass, aardgas=natural gas, kolen=coal

    But: only 33% of the renewable energy is produced in NL, most is “greenwashing” through european green certificates
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeSep 25th 2021 edited
     
    109 gm/kWh is not bad, only 2.5 times the BC value. I think it's about the same as the national value for filthy polluting Canada.
    •  
      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeOct 6th 2021
     
    Trump on Nuclear Power: Revisit Regulations - YouTube

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=mXaDqRrPc_M
    •  
      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeOct 9th 2021
     
    ARC 100 MWe Modular Reactor Targets 2029 Start in New Brunswick Canada | NextBigFuture.com

    https://www.nextbigfuture.com/2021/10/173426.html
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      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeOct 17th 2021