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  1.  
    So where does it go?
  2.  
    Consider a box of elastic particles (no dissipation therefore) in a vanishingly low field (e/m and gravity) region, and let the initial state be with all particles clumped together in one corner, with arbitrary initial velocities, representing a very high information (low entropy) state. Let the system evolve over time and you end up with a uniform soup with no distinguishing features. That's where it went.
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      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeJul 4th 2018
     
  3.  
    Ah, the old neodymium-doped yttrium orthovanadate trick.
  4.  
    Yeah, pond scum, damned orthovanadates are scattered all over the northeast side, slouching in doorways and abandoned buildings, selling anything they can scavenge for their next neodymium fix. Yttrium is not sending us their best orthos! Build the Wall!
    • CommentAuthorkorkskrew
    • CommentTimeJul 15th 2018
     
    Did you guys know that IBM has a 5 qbit quantum computer available via the internet for free. The web site will also simulate a larger (up to 20 qbit) quantum computer if you want to do larger experiments with it.
    https://quantumexperience.ng.bluemix.net/qx/experience
    There's a full user manual that describes how to use it.
  5.  
    Can it be programmed to use the Palfreyman Sieve to compute the nth prime, for arbitrary n?
    • CommentAuthorkorkskrew
    • CommentTimeJul 15th 2018
     
    I haven't read the user manual yet.
    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeJul 15th 2018
     
    Posted By: korkskrewDid you guys know that IBM has a 5 qbit quantum computer available via the internet for free. The web site will also simulate a larger (up to 20 qbit) quantum computer if you want to do larger experiments with it.
    https://quantumexperience.ng.bluemix.net/qx/experience
    There's a full user manual that describes how to use it.


    You would know about this if you'd read my post a little more than a year ago on this thread.

    But that's okay, I'll mention it again in 14 months...
    • CommentAuthorkorkskrew
    • CommentTimeJul 15th 2018
     
    Figured that would happen. That's why I posted it as a question. Clever, eh?
    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeJul 15th 2018 edited
     
    Mostly I see the immediate use of QC to be in writing fanciful articles about how it could break Bitcoin.
    • CommentAuthorkorkskrew
    • CommentTimeJul 15th 2018
     
    They'll be needing more qbits.
  6.  
    We'll need a bigger qubit.
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      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeJul 21st 2018
     
    Sometimes Quantum computers do not need to distinguish between cause and effect at all.

    https://www.nextbigfuture.com/2018/07/sometimes-quantum-computers-do-not-need-to-distinguish-between-cause-and-effect-at-all.html
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      CommentAuthoralsetalokin
    • CommentTimeJul 21st 2018 edited
     
    Good, because there isn't any difference.

    There is only one thing, one process. There is only now.
  7.  
    when?
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      CommentAuthoraber0der
    • CommentTimeJul 21st 2018
     
    There.
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      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeAug 8th 2018
     
    Heres hoping.

    Rigetti Computing hopes to have a functioning 128 qubit quantum computer within 12 months.

    https://www.nextbigfuture.com/2018/08/rigetti-computing-hopes-to-have-a-functioning-128-qubit-quantum-computer-within-12-months.html
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      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeAug 13th 2018
     
    Next four years will determine if noisy quantum computers can beat current computers.

    https://www.nextbigfuture.com/2018/08/next-four-years-will-determine-if-noisy-quantum-computers-can-beat-current-computers.html
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      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeAug 13th 2018 edited
     
    Demo of two-qubit fault-tolerant universal holonomic quantum gates could enable faster quantum computers.

    https://www.nextbigfuture.com/2018/08/demo-of-two-qubit-fault-tolerant-universal-holonomic-quantum-gates-could-enable-faster-quantum-computers.html