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    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeJul 9th 2019
     
    Posted By: alsetalokinSeagulls are much more aggressive than pigeons though. I've seen them steal food items from people eating at outdoor tables on the Santa Cruz wharf. I mean right from the plates or even from hands! There are even warning signs.


    I've seen similar behavior from Steller's Jays.
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeJul 9th 2019
     
    I'll feed them if they agree not to sing.
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      CommentAuthorgoatcheez
    • CommentTimeAug 17th 2019
     
    Luigi's lemon Italian ice.

    Sometimes my wife sees human. Actually brought it to me.
    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeAug 17th 2019
     
    Been eating a lot of cherries and mangoes lately. The mango seeds get pressed into houseplant duty. They thrive in the summertime outside, but need to go indoors for the colder weather.

    I figure I'll be set when the US Pacific Northwest develops a tropical climate.
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      CommentAuthorgoatcheez
    • CommentTimeSep 4th 2019
     
  1.  
    Posted By: AsterixBeen eating a lot of cherries and mangoes lately. The mango seeds get pressed into houseplant duty. They thrive in the summertime outside, but need to go indoors for the colder weather.

    I figure I'll be set when the US Pacific Northwest develops a tropical climate.


    Do you have to do anything special to get the mango seeds to sprout? We have a small cultivar showing up in the stores called "honey mango" that I think I would like to grow if it can be done.
    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeSep 5th 2019 edited
     
    Here's how I do it--and it seems to be pretty successful.

    Take the pit and pry it open to release the seed inside (this also works for other stone fruit, such as peaches). Wrap the seed in a wet paper towel, place it in a plastic sandwich bag and seal it tightly. Let germinate in a dark, warm place. After a couple of weeks, you should see both the taproot and the stem sprouting from the seed. Plant the seed lying on its "back" with the sprouted end nearest the surface and the taproot well buried. Use damp, sandy soil with a little bulb fertilizer. I start mine out on a sunny windowsill, then transplant to a pot for outdoors (summer). When the cold weather arrives, they'll come inside.

    The speed at which these things grow is pretty startling.
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      CommentAuthoralsetalokin
    • CommentTimeSep 5th 2019 edited
     
    Thanks, I'll give it a try. Any luck with the cherries?
    And how cold is "cold"? It doesn't actually freeze where you live, does it?
    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeSep 5th 2019
     
    Oh, on occasion it does indeed freeze. Last year, on the first day of spring, we got three feet of snow. I take the trees in when we start looking at consistent nighttime temps below 50F. I've wondered if you can bury them in the ground during winter, like you'd do with fig trees.

    Around here, the cherries pretty much seed themselves--although you probably won't get much more than blueberry-sized cherries from seed. Turkey, jay and raccoon food. Like apples, a producing cherry is usually the product of grafting a scion to a different rootstock. On the other hand, they're pretty when they bloom in spring and when the leaves turn colors in autumn.
    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTime1 day ago
     
    Decided to go Sephardic tonight:

    Spinach, cheese, chickpea casserole. I added some mushrooms. A very nice late dinner dish; the allspice adds an interesting touch.