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    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeNov 10th 2019
     
    Posted By: AngusI always understood that pasta was a Chinese dish brought back to Italy by the trade that Marco Polo started.


    Sort of, I don't think that the Chinese had durum wheat, however.
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeNov 10th 2019
     
    Noodles, then.
  1.  
    But they can't pronounce that
  2.  
    I make it a practice never to eat anything I cannot pronounce.
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      CommentAuthorDuracell
    • CommentTimeNov 10th 2019
     
    Probably not a bad idea in places like Iceland, Greenland and northern Scandinavia ...
    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeNov 10th 2019
     
    Posted By: AngusNoodles, then.


    Actually, Polo didn't have anything to do with Italian pasta, which had been known in Italy long before Polo's birth. Various sources credit the Arabs for bringing it to Italy, though some maintain that the ancient Greeks also had the stuff.

    Lots of content on the web, e.g.

    Don't believe everything you learn in school.
  3.  
    But did they pronounce it "Pawsta" like "faucet" or "closet", or "Pahsta" like "faster" not "foster" ?
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeNov 10th 2019
     
    Posted By: AsterixPolo didn't have anything to do with Italian pasta


    Agreed. I looked it up too, afterwards. The Romans seem to have had something like lasagne.
  4.  
    No wonder their roads are still around.
    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeNov 10th 2019
     
    Posted By: alsetalokinBut did they pronounce it "Pawsta" like "faucet" or "closet", or "Pahsta" like "faster" not "foster" ?


    I believe that the "y" is silent and invisible, as in "saloon".
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeNov 10th 2019 edited
     
    "Faster" but probably not the "faster" they say in TX.
    I would imagine if your ear is attuned to many US accents it would sound aboot half way between faster and father.
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeNov 12th 2019
     
    49th Perpendicular

    Once I heard a Yankee say
    "That pat of posta's hat today"
    (This was out Chicago* way.)
    And it disturbed my peace of mind
    To see our Cousins so unkind
    Abusing poor wee letter "a".

    The South that knew what slaves were for
    Adds on abuses even more
    In Jaja, it must work as “or"
    They use three vowels where one would do
    “Ayand” “eyind” up paying more than due
    In wages so the vowels won’t sue.

    I say "about", they hear "aboot"
    The same ones don't know "rout" from "route"
    And leave the y-sound out of "suit"
    And Noo Yahk leaves it out of “new".
    It’s OK if you’re passing through
    But soon becomes a bugaboo.


    *A city in the USA
    But smaller than the GTA
    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeNov 12th 2019 edited
     
    That's wrong for Chicago. I'd put it more at Boston.

    Cleveland has been viewed traditionally as the location of the "neutral" US accent. I don't know of any Chicagoan who would identify himself as a "Yankee". That term's reserved for parts east.

    FIfty-four forty or fight.
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeNov 12th 2019
     
    I agree about Boston. I have heard Chicagoans who sound that way (to me). Maybe they were crypto-Bostonians. I am also aware that Yankee has a reserved meaning - to Yankees. To my ear the most neutral US accents are from the NorthWest (which means they talk like me.)

    Free Cascadia from the Yankees!
    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeNov 12th 2019
     
    A pure Chicago accent is very distinctive. "th" turns into "d" in many cases.

    Chicago gets its intonation from the large Eastern European immigration during the 19th and early 20th century. Mostly Pole, Czech, etc. Think Upton Sinclair.

    For example, natives know how to pronounce "Kosciusko" correctly. Although Goethe Street (Near North Side) usually gets rendered as "Goath" or even "Goathee".

    Ref
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeNov 12th 2019
     
    Thankyou. I'll assume my Chicagoan was an immigrant from the coast.

    The actual story was even better than the doggerel. I was standing by the elevator in a conference hotel and a woman asked me where she could get a "pap". Having had some exposure to gynecological issues I was rather taken aback. She then explained that she was looking for the "pap machine", and after another double take I figured it out. In our subsequent elevator chat she mentioned that she came from Chicago.
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      CommentAuthorpcstru
    • CommentTimeNov 12th 2019
     
    I'm back to page 8 & Gravlax. I read that you can dry it out on paper parchment in the fridge and it will then keep for ages. Not sure salt cured raw fish is something I want to push the use by date on.
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeNov 12th 2019
     
    Posted By: pcstruNot sure salt cured raw fish is something I want to push the use by date on.


    Many voyages depended on that sort of thing in days gone by. You weren't supposed to get it wet unless you intended to eat it.
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      CommentAuthorpcstru
    • CommentTimeNov 12th 2019
     
    Posted By: AngusMany voyages depended on that sort of thing in days gone by.

    Not all of them came back ...
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeNov 12th 2019
     
    Good point.