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  1.  
    Posted By: Asterixhow else can you be assured that the thing is fresh?


    Just check the date on the jar?

    Posted By: goatcheezIn the south...pickled.
  2.  
    We just call them beets, or sugar beets, around here. Major industry in certain parts of this state.
    •  
      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeMar 11th 2020
     
    So it was in Manitoba back in the dark ages of my childhood. I will never forget being sent out to hoe a row of them I remember now as being 10 miles long. In Manitoba then, an actual one mile would not have been impossible.
    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeMar 11th 2020
     
    The US generally doesn't use "beetroot"; it's just "beets" and "beet greens" or "beets" for the whole plant. I use the term to be specific. Turnips are much the same--nobody says "turniproot", but if you're talking about the above-ground part of the plant, it's often "turnip tops".

    Unless you're shopping at a place that offers organic produce, most supermarkets discard the greens before putting the beets out. With just the root, one can keep them around for a couple of weeks without anyone being the wiser. Organic offerings almost always include the greens.

    Most USAns don't care for beet(root) in any form, although I've fed guests chocolate cake with a beetroot filler and nobody was the wiser. Keeps the cake moist and gives it a deep velvet color.
  3.  
    I do like the pickled beets. Turnip greens, collard greens, other rough greens are indeed part of our southern USA staple diet, along with hominy grits.

    The TurniProot are redundant.
    •  
      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeMar 11th 2020
     
    Pickled beets wirth cloves. Wonderful.
    •  
      CommentAuthorDuracell
    • CommentTimeMar 11th 2020
     
    Posted By: AngusQuestion: my English relatives say "beetroot" . My Canadian ones scoff a bit at this and call them "beets". How is it elsewhere?
    Interesting. The farmers that grow them here generally refer to them as “beets”, whereas the consumers here who buy and eat them generally say “beetroot”. I have no idea why.
    • CommentAuthorloreman
    • CommentTimeMar 11th 2020
     
    Sliced beetroot is a standard part of a proper hamburger here.
    •  
      CommentAuthorgoatcheez
    • CommentTimeMar 11th 2020
     
    You want a fried egg with that?
    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeMar 11th 2020
     
    How about this one?

    10 medium beets
    1 gallon water
    2½ pounds sugar
    1 cake yeast
    ¼ tsp. pepper

    Pare and quarter beets. Boil in water until tender. Let stand 24 hours. Remove beets. Add enough water to make 1 full gallon liquid. Add sugar and pepper. Boil 10 minutes . Strain through cheesecloth into clay crock. Spread yeast on a slice of bread that has been thoroughly dried in the oven. Place in lukewarm liquid. Let ferment 10 days. Bottle. Do not cork tightly.

    Lithuanian Burokinė.
  4.  
    Sounds lethal all right.
    (puts beets on shopping list)
    •  
      CommentAuthorgoatcheez
    • CommentTimeMar 11th 2020
     
    Just don't refrigerate your leftover borscht for a few days.
    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeMar 11th 2020
     
    I've got similar recipes that involve the use of grain alcohol...
    •  
      CommentAuthoralsetalokin
    • CommentTimeMar 11th 2020 edited
     
    So do I and they are a lot simpler.

    One bottle of Everclear kept at freezer temperature
    One bottle of Welch's Concord Grape juice

    Stir together, pour over ice, keep away from fire or flame

    (even looks like the real thing)
    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeMar 11th 2020
     
    Here's a typical sample from my collection:

    1 large bottle porter
    1 cup sugar
    2 lemons
    1 stick vanilla
    1 pint grain alcohol

    Wash lemons, slice very thin, remove seeds. Add sugar, vanilla and ale. Boil 15 minues. Cool. Strain, add alcohol. Bottle.

    Here's another:

    1 quart grain alcohol
    1 quart milk
    4 cups sugar
    2 oranges
    2 lemons
    1 stick vanilla

    Wash oranges and lemons; do not peel. Cut into small pieces; remove seeds. Combine milk, alcohol and sugar. Add vanilla, oranges and lemons. Stir ell with wooden spoon to dissolve sugar. Cover container with cloth. Let stand at room temperature for 3 weeks, stirring the mixture daily. Strain; discard fruit. Funnel through filter paper into bottles; cork.
    •  
      CommentAuthorgoatcheez
    • CommentTimeMar 11th 2020
     
    Those all sound great! Too bad I quit drinking.

    When I was in college they warned us not to drink the laboratory grade alcohol because the chemically derived ethanol had a small benzene content and benzene was carcinogenic. I always wondered if that was just a way of conserving stock.
    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeMar 11th 2020
     
    Probably--particularly if the stuff was analytic grade; usually more pure than USP.
    •  
      CommentAuthoraber0der
    • CommentTimeMar 20th 2020
     
    • CommentAuthorBigOilRep
    • CommentTimeMar 20th 2020
     
    Posted By: aber0derhttps://youtu.be/Ho4nKoCnTuk

    That video has 1 view, suggesting you didn't even watch it.
    • CommentAuthorBigOilRep
    • CommentTimeMar 20th 2020
     
    I did though and it was fascinating.