Vanilla 1.1.9 is a product of Lussumo. More Information: Documentation, Community Support.

    •  
      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeJan 14th 2013
     
    •  
      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeJan 29th 2013
     
    •  
      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeMar 4th 2013
     
    •  
      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeMar 15th 2013
     
    •  
      CommentAuthorDuracell
    • CommentTimeMar 15th 2013
     
    Posted By: TrimPo

    Researchers find it would require 2.4 times less energy to create a black hole than thought


    Erm .. I could understand something requiring 2.4 times more energy than thought, or only requiring 0.41667 times as much energy as thought, but how exactly could something require 2.4 times less energy than thought?
    • CommentAuthortinker
    • CommentTimeMar 15th 2013 edited
     
    Such a conclusion is normally reached after spending 2.4 times longer thinking about it.
    •  
      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeMar 15th 2013
     
    You asking me?
    • CommentAuthortinker
    • CommentTimeMar 15th 2013
     
    Nope, I'm telling you. And Romford beats Chelmsford every time.
    •  
      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeMar 15th 2013
     
    What particles are a Romford and Chelmsford are they up or down or just charming?
    • CommentAuthortinker
    • CommentTimeMar 15th 2013
     
    Strange you should ask.
    •  
      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeMar 15th 2013
     
    Well you have to get to the top and bottom of it to get the true flavour.
  1.  
    Posted By: Duracell
    Posted By: TrimPo

    Researchers find it would require 2.4 times less energy to create a black hole than thought


    Erm .. I could understand something requiring 2.4 times more energy than thought, or only requiring 0.41667 times as much energy as thought, but how exactly could something require 2.4 times less energy than thought?

    It's easier to understand if you use percentages. 2.4 times something is clearly 240 percent of it, so the discovery means that black holes only need 240 percent less energy than previously thought. Since normally, or before, the energy required would be 100 percent, this represents a savings of 140 percent of the energy that they previously thought it would take.

    There, simple enough?
    •  
      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeMar 15th 2013
     
    A savings of 140 percent on an outlay would actually mean an income. Basically you would get the black hole for no cost and receive some energy on top. It would be "free", so to speak. We might call it "free energy".

    Somewhere in this calculation we have lost 100% of something, but it's good to a first approximation.
  2.  
    I think you've just discovered how many Free Energy systems operate. They depend strongly on these kinds of calculations to obtain their results.


    I'm just glad the amount wasn't 2.5 times less. That's my personal limit.
    •  
      CommentAuthorlegendre
    • CommentTimeMar 15th 2013
     
    Posted By: alsetalokinI think you've just discovered how many Free Energy systems operate. They depend strongly on these kinds of calculations to obtain their results.


    Yep, kind of a long, drawn out crooked bellhop problem.
    •  
      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeMay 25th 2013
     
    •  
      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeMay 25th 2013
     
    •  
      CommentAuthoroak
    • CommentTimeMay 26th 2013 edited
     
    Posted By: TrimPo Feb 2013

    Dark matter and galaxies part ways in collision between hefty galaxy clusters

    As far as I can tell, the PhysOrg story at that link, although dated in PhysOrg as February 28, 2013, is based on a journal article that was published a year earlier, on February 28, 2012,

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1202.6368

    (asserting that the apparent dark matter found in a cluster was not anchored to the visible galaxies in the cluster).

    That article's conclusions were subsequently contradicted by another team's findings in November 2012,

    http://phys.org/news/2012-11-dark-core-scientists-merging-galaxy.html

    (asserting that the apparent dark matter they found in the same cluster was in fact well-anchored to the visible galaxies in the cluster).

    -----------------------

    ETA: March 2012 PhysOrg article on the February 2012 arxiv article:
    http://phys.org/news/2012-03-dark-core-defies-explanation.html
    •  
      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeMay 31st 2013
     
    •  
      CommentAuthoralsetalokin
    • CommentTimeMay 31st 2013 edited
     
    Dark matter, humbug. I've discovered something much better, it-doesn't-matter, or IDM for short. IDM pervades the known Universe, yet doesn't interact in any way with anything, except to make it more dull. Many terrestrial objects, people and spacetime events are composed entirely of IDM, apparently, and it has been the subject of countless research papers over the years, without anyone even realizing it.