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  1.  
    More likely that, than dark energy.
  2.  
    I'd go with light energy
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      CommentAuthorDuracell
    • CommentTimeSep 11th 2019
     
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      CommentAuthoralsetalokin
    • CommentTimeSep 12th 2019 edited
     
    That would be frustrating, wouldn't it? To find a planet that was small enough to be habitable but was still so large that chemical rockets can't get you safely down and back up again, since the gravity well is too deep.
  3.  
    It's called commitment
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      CommentAuthorDuracell
    • CommentTimeSep 12th 2019
     
    Posted By: alsetalokinThat would be frustrating, wouldn't it? To find a planet that was small enough to be habitable but was still so large that chemical rockets can't get you safely down and back up again, since the gravity well is too deep.
    Yes, but great plot device for a sci-fi story set on a penal colony exoplanet though!
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      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeSep 12th 2019
     
    Perfect for remainers, boom, boom.
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeSep 12th 2019
     
    Posted By: Andrew PalfreymanIt's called commitment


    Sure is. If you can't get from zero speed at the surface to escape velocity with a chemical rocket, then you can't get from far away to zero speed at the surface with a chemical rocket.
  4.  
    No. That assumes no atmosphere.
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeSep 12th 2019
     
    True. But if you plan to set up a design team for an aerobraking system in an unknown atmosphere starting from interstellar velocities, I think I should buy the pizza franchise next door.
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      CommentAuthoraber0der
    • CommentTimeSep 12th 2019
     
  5.  
    Too many zeros.
    • CommentAuthorBigOilRep
    • CommentTimeSep 13th 2019
     
    Posted By: Andrew PalfreymanNo. That assumes no atmosphere.

    Which might be a safe bet.
    •  
      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeSep 16th 2019
     
    New results for the mass of neutrinos.

    https://phys.org/news/2019-09-results-mass-neutrinos.html
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeSep 16th 2019
     
    It has a mass but it remains forever smaller than you can measure.
    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeSep 16th 2019
     
    Well, to be a bit more accurate, the experiments set an upper limit (with 90 percent confidence) on the mass of a neutrino as being less than 1 eV.

    Somewhat akin to ascertaining that the mass of my body, estimated with 90 percent confidence, to be less than 1 metric ton.
  6.  
    I'm unaware of the significance of a neutrino having mass. Or at least unaware of a theory that predicts that. Certainly not the Standard Model at least - everyone seemed quite OK with massless neutrinos under the Standard Model, before it was found to be otherwise.
    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeSep 17th 2019
     
    I think that, for most intents and purposes, the mass of a neutrino can be stated as "insignificant' in the same way that my own mass, compared to the solar mass, is insignificant. Perhaps not zero, but close enough.
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeSep 17th 2019
     
    Well it has some significance. It allows neutrinos to exist in three different varieties and to oscillate among them. Which explains some issues with the solar neutrino flux.
  7.  
    But photon polarisation