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      CommentAuthoraber0der
    • CommentTimeOct 9th 2019
     
    "getoverit"
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      CommentAuthoraber0der
    • CommentTimeOct 9th 2019 edited
     
    Wehe, wenn der Mistral weht. Der kalte Wind aus Nordwesten macht den Astronomen am Observatoire de Haute-Provence (OHP) an etwa 45 Tagen im Jahr zu schaffen. Nicht, weil er für frostige Temperaturen sorgt. Dagegen kann man sich wappnen. Problematisch ist vielmehr, dass atmosphärische Störungen die Beobachtungsbedingungen dann schlagartig verschlechtern.

    Normalerweise haben Himmelsgucker dort draußen, rund 100 Kilometer nördlich von Marseille, einen vergleichsweise ungestörten Blick in den französischen Nachthimmel. Auf einem Plateau stehen, rund 650 Meter über dem Meer, vier Spiegelteleskope. Sie sind nicht besonders groß, sie sind nicht besonders modern.

    Und doch hat eines von ihnen unseren Blick auf den Kosmos revolutioniert: Am 1,93-Meter-Teleskop des OHP haben der Schweizer Astrophysiker Michel Mayor und sein damaliger Doktorand Didier Queloz vor einem knappen Vierteljahrhundert den ersten bekannten Planeten außerhalb des Sonnensystems aufgespürt: 51 Pegasi b, heute in den Himmelskarten als Dimidium verzeichnet.

    https://www.spiegel.de/wissenschaft/weltall/physik-nobelpreis-sind-wir-allein-und-warum-gibt-es-uns-ueberhaupt-a-1290568.html
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeOct 9th 2019
     
    Well, OK, then
  1.  
    Wow that was weird. I read about half of that post by aber0der before I realized it was in German.
  2.  
    Manitoba. I knew there was a reason, goddammit.
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeOct 9th 2019
     
    For what? I grew up there so I have a need to know.
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      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeOct 9th 2019
     
  3.  
    That's nothing new. My bank account has been in that state for years.
  4.  
    Quantised nothingness
  5.  
    The packaging is worth more than the contents.
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      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeOct 9th 2019
     
    Physicists report a way to 'hear' dark matter.

    https://phys.org/news/2019-10-physicists-dark.html
  6.  
    They'll hear nothing I imagine. But it's ingenious
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      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeOct 10th 2019
     
    Researchers theorize origins of magnetars, the strongest magnets in the universe.

    https://phys.org/news/2019-10-theorize-magnetars-strongest-magnets-universe.html
  7.  
    SGR 1900+14, located 20,000 light-years away in the constellation Aquila. After a long period of low emissions (significant bursts only in 1979 and 1993) it became active in May–August 1998, and a burst detected on August 27, 1998 was of sufficient power to force NEAR Shoemaker to shut down to prevent damage and to saturate instruments on BeppoSAX, WIND and RXTE.
  8.  
    They should call them "sterilizars".
  9.  
    We're getting something wrong about the universe.

    It might be something small: a measurement issue that makes certain stars looks closer or farther away than they are, something astrophysicists could fix with a few tweaks to how they measure distances across space. It might be something big: an error — or series of errors — in cosmology, or our understanding of the universe's origin and evolution. If that's the case, our entire history of space and time may be messed up. But whatever the issue is, it's making key observations of the universe disagree with each other: Measured one way, the universe appears to be expanding at a certain rate; measured another way, the universe appears to be expanding at a different rate. And, as a new paper shows, those discrepancies have gotten larger in recent years, even as the measurements have gotten more precise.
    ref.
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      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeOct 12th 2019
     
    Thanks interesting.
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      CommentAuthoralsetalokin
    • CommentTimeOct 12th 2019 edited
     
    Gravity = acceleration = gravity. It's the acceleration due to the unfurling of one or more of the 7 furled spacetime dimensions that are even now expanding from within the cores of active galaxies. Our 4-space is already mostly unfurled so it doesn't look like the acceleration of gravity is taking us anywhere locally. This is the "leakage from another dimension" that one sometimes hears about as "explanation" of what we perceive as gravity in our expanded 4-space. It is acceleration, in the 5-direction defined by concentrations of matter. Mass is just an algebraic rearrangement of acceleration.
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      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeOct 12th 2019
     
    That is deep man.
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    It goes all the way down.

    It's a good thing those other dimensions are so tightly wrapped. It's like a ball of rubber bands. Or the inside of a golf ball. All is well as long as it stays compressed. Once it starts unravelling though... look out.