Vanilla 1.1.9 is a product of Lussumo. More Information: Documentation, Community Support.

    •  
      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeJul 20th 2011
     
    Posted By: enginerdNot geothermal in the usual historic sense, yes.

    Since it does use the temperature of the earth to heat (or cool) something else, it probably isn't too egregious a crime against vocabulary to apply it to these heat pump sinks.

    Now, real geothermal, Yellowstone Park stuff, that is the bomb.


    Crime is not against etymology, but against customary usage. Since customary usage is what seems to rule these days, I am surprised not to find more objection to the redefinition.

    Yes - if you could build your house on top of Old Faithful, you could have very reliable geothermal heat.
    • CommentAuthorlicojet
    • CommentTimeJul 20th 2011
     
    .... and no roof.
    •  
      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeJul 20th 2011
     
    Posted By: licojet.... and no roof.


    Well, with all that heat, you wouldn't need one. And the rain going up would counter the rain coming down.
    • CommentAuthorenginerd
    • CommentTimeJul 20th 2011
     
    •  
      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeJul 20th 2011 edited
     
    Posted By: enginerd?


    Posted By: enginerdCustomary usage is a fickle thing.

    [url=http://www.quantumgeothermal.com/?gclid=CP2E_Ki-kKoCFUJn5Qodh1d3wg

    In Ontario this usage seems to be quite common.]http://www.quantumgeothermal.com/?gclid=CP2E_Ki-kKoCFUJn5Qodh1d3wg[url]

    In Ontario this usage seems to be quite common.


    Sorry can only get this one to work.

    http://www.quantumgeothermal.com/?gclid=CP2E_Ki-kKoCFUJn5Qodh1d3wg
    • CommentAuthorenginerd
    • CommentTimeJul 20th 2011
     
    Thanks. I'm not sure what I did to make that mess but I clearly wasn't paying attention. Maybe I should have to spend 5 minutes in the BBC practice thread.
    •  
      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeJul 20th 2011
     
    Posted By: enginerdCustomary usage is a fickle thing.


    Indeed. Which is why I prefer traditional usage plus etymology.
    • CommentAuthortinker
    • CommentTimeJul 20th 2011
     
    There are big subsidies available in France for ground-source heat pumps when used for home heating and hot water.... Several of my neighbours there have switched over- and if your house is suitably located they subsidize air-source ones too. Nice thing is that some are 'reversible' and can be set to cooling duties in the summertime.

    One of aforesaid neighbours is as tight as tick btw- famously so -so it must be an attractive packeage.
    • CommentAuthorjoshs
    • CommentTimeJul 20th 2011
     
    Posted By: licojet.... and no roof.
    But you'd have all the sulfur dioxide you could ever want.
    • CommentAuthorjoshs
    • CommentTimeJul 20th 2011
     
    Posted By: tinkerThere are big subsidies available in France for ground-source heat pumps when used for home heating and hot water.... Several of my neighbours there have switched over- and if your house is suitably located they subsidize air-source ones too. Nice thing is that some are 'reversible' and can be set to cooling duties in the summertime.

    One of aforesaid neighbours is as tight as tick btw- famously so -so it must be an attractive packeage.
    I believe that Holland also pushes ground source heat pumps. The COPs for ground source can be 10 or higher versus 3-4 for a typical air source in a moderate climate.
    • CommentAuthorNoKlu
    • CommentTimeJul 20th 2011
     
    I have a friend that supplies the geothermal guys with drill bits. Last time I asked him it was about $20,000 for a system in Alberta. It heats or cools to about 50 degrees Fahrenheit. You have to make up the difference to about 70.
    • CommentAuthortinker
    • CommentTimeJul 20th 2011
     
    •  
      CommentAuthorDerrickA
    • CommentTimeJul 20th 2011
     
    The ground source heat pump concept has certainly been around for a while. When I was still in grade school (late 70's), I recall a teacher showing us a short film titled "Bill Loosely's Heat Pump"(1975) on the topic of ground source heat pumps. The film is still available in the NFB Canada archives, and obtainable on DVD.
    http://www.onf-nfb.gc.ca/eng/collection/film/?id=11512
    •  
      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeJul 20th 2011
     
    "Ground source heat pump" is so much better a term than "geothermal heating system"
    •  
      CommentAuthorLoonyman
    • CommentTimeJul 21st 2011 edited
     
    An apartment I lived in a few years ago here in Stockholm had a Solar / Geothermal heating system installed while I was there,

    IIRC they drilled down about 200 meters and the cost was about 1000:- Swedish per meter, however our landlord said it would pay for itself in less than ten years.
    http://www.greentechmedia.com/articles/read/solar-thermal-geothermal-energy-storage/

    Although Geothermal does have its risks... ( This is a pretty unusual one!!!)
    http://www.thelocal.se/23788/20091211/
  1.  
    ok
    title of this thread was
    "Geothermal Electricity"
    what does this have to do with a heat pump system???
    • CommentAuthortinker
    • CommentTimeJul 21st 2011
     
    The clue lies in the word 'thermal'.....
    •  
      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeJul 21st 2011
     
    dixipnum had received a grant to put in a ground source heat pump. The question is really what that has to do with geothermal electricity.
    • CommentAuthordixiepnum
    • CommentTimeJul 21st 2011
     
    The question is can I use the temperature differences to somehow get a sterling engine going to generate electricity?

    Eg....summer ground temp 50 degrees, air temp 85 degrees
    ...winter ground temp 50 degrees, air temp minus 10 degrees
    ...i suppose it won't work when the air temp is 50 +\- 10 degrees

    Can a sterling generate electricity on temp diffs that are this small? If so, how would I rig it up?
    • CommentAuthordixiepnum
    • CommentTimeJul 21st 2011
     
    Btw....according to geothermix.com, the cost is around 20$k, with $8k in rebates. Payback is 4-6 years including interest costs...