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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeJul 29th 2011
     
    OK - sorry. I thought you said you had bought one of the originals second hand.
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      CommentAuthorDerrickA
    • CommentTimeJul 29th 2011
     
    Apple released new versions of the Mac mini just a few days ago. You can now get a quad core server version with dual drives. You can also pack at least four mini units into a 1U rack shelf, effectively giving you 16 cores in a 1U space.

    Model Name: Mac mini Server
    Processor Name: quad-core Intel Core i7
    Processor Speed: 2.0 GHz
    Number of Processors: 1
    Total Number of Cores: 4
    L2 Cache: 6 MB
    Memory: 8 GB
    Intel Thunderbolt port (up to 10 Gbps) transfer speed.
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeJul 29th 2011
     
    Posted By: DerrickAApple released new versions of the Mac mini just a few days ago. You can now get a quad core server version with dual drives. You can also pack at least four mini units into a 1U rack shelf, effectively giving you 16 cores in a 1U space.

    Model Name: Mac mini Server
    Processor Name: quad-core Intel Core i7
    Processor Speed: 2.0 GHz
    Number of Processors: 1
    Total Number of Cores: 4
    L2 Cache: 6 MB
    Memory: 8 GB
    Intel Thunderboltport (up to 10 Gbps) transfer speed.


    Yeah - I liked the old PowerPC mini for its form factor, so I have had my eye on that new one.
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      CommentAuthorDerrickA
    • CommentTimeJul 29th 2011
     
    Posted By: AngusYeah - I liked the old PowerPC mini for its form factor, so I have had my eye on that new one.


    So do I. The new mini is even smaller, as it dosn't have a built in DVD drive (Installs are done from USB thumb drives or internet). If you order a mini with a SSHD, it has no moving parts (except for a tiny fan).
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      CommentAuthorgenesis
    • CommentTimeJul 29th 2011
     
    ok, i've done the clean install. it is fast enough and i've changed my general view of linux as well. it is not bad at all and it is going to stay on my PC...but...i am nowhere near to replace my win7 at the moment...future will show. Also i'm going to look at the mint11 at some point as Duracell suggested.

    thank u folks for assistance.
  1.  
    Posted By: AngusOK - sorry. I thought you said you had bought one of the originals second hand.


    It was a second hand model, but a bit more modern - it had to be because the tools I wanted to test out aren't supported on old PowerPC models.

    TBH, I was going for the absolute minimum spec, but the 8Gb wasn't that much more, and it turns out it can do my VM / VPN hosting in a much neater package, so I'm retiring the old desktop to the attic as a backup.

    No idea if I like Lion much yet - it's really only been a fancy VMWare shell - but I'll poke around at it more this weekend.
  2.  
    @genesis

    Excellent, now you can hate it for more informed and considered reasons :-)
    • CommentAuthorenginerd
    • CommentTimeJul 29th 2011
     
    I cannot keep up with this thread at it's current impressive post rate.
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      CommentAuthorgenesis
    • CommentTimeJul 29th 2011
     
    folks, is it possible in ubuntu to totally remove the password?
  3.  
    @genesis

    Gah.

    Do you mean to stop it asking you for a password when you want to install software etc. or to stop prompting you for a password when you login?
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      CommentAuthorgenesis
    • CommentTimeJul 29th 2011
     
    everything:D
  4.  
    Posted By: genesisfolks, is it possible in ubuntu to totally remove the password?

    Why would you want to do that?

    Linux is a multi-user environment out of the gate, unlike Windows. You should actually have two "users" even on a single user machine: root, and yourself. Your normal account has limited priveleges, to keep you from fkuping yourself too much by accident. Root is God, can do anything to the system and to anybody's account, except decrypt the main password file (legally). When you do a "sudo" command and enter your own shell password, you are temporarily elevating your own privileges to the status of "SuperUser" who then can "do" lots of stuff to your own account and to the system as a whole, but still not as much as root can do.
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      CommentAuthortimetrumpet
    • CommentTimeJul 29th 2011 edited
     
    What do you want to do that for? Please be as detailed as possible.

    There's always a way to do these things in Linux, but rarely a need to do that sort of thing in that exact way.

    ETA: Please don't regard these questions as criticism - it's just another are where the philosophy is a bit different
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      CommentAuthorgenesis
    • CommentTimeJul 29th 2011
     
    Posted By: alsetalokinbut still not as much as root can do.
    So how do i become a root? i've tried a windows(ish)-way of changing things so far with little success ....ok...root=admin right?
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      CommentAuthormaryyugo
    • CommentTimeJul 29th 2011
     
    Please be as detailed as possible.
    Good old TT. He must enjoy reading dictionaries.
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      CommentAuthorgenesis
    • CommentTimeJul 29th 2011
     
    Posted By: timetrumpetWhat do you want to do that for? Please be as detailed as possible.
    alright then: i don't like that there are folders that i cannot access , also i don't like passwords on every step...it's a bit annoying...
  5.  
    Posted By: maryyugo
    Please be as detailed as possible.
    Good old TT. He must enjoy reading dictionaries.


    I just prefer to know what I'm doing instead of fucking it up at every step and then whining on here about it.
  6.  
    Posted By: genesis
    Posted By: timetrumpetWhat do you want to do that for? Please be as detailed as possible.
    alright then: i don't like that there are folders that i cannot access , also i don't like passwords on every step...it's a bit annoying...


    If you can't get into a folder, it's usually for a reason;which folder are you trying to access and why?

    There are folders - like MS OS - where if you accidentally delete files, you will be in trouble.

    There are also files and folders that aren't files or folders, but are representations of various hardware and process features.

    By passwords at every step, I presume you mean installing software?
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      CommentAuthorgenesis
    • CommentTimeJul 29th 2011
     
    Posted By: timetrumpetIf you can't get into a folder, it's usually for a reason;which folder are you trying to access and why?
    well,for example lost+found or root folders...no particular reason,just wanted to have a look what's inside.

    Posted By: timetrumpetThere are folders - like MS OS - where if you accidentally delete files, you will be in trouble.
    then i would have ruined every single windows installation...not so, so far...don't see why this should be different with linux

    Posted By: timetrumpetBy passwords at every step, I presume you mean installing software?
    yes and the fully automatic logon and no wake up from sleep password too...i've managed to change the "boot" screen password dialog but it still pops up when desktop is loaded...

    P.S. look...if it takes more than few minutes for you to explain , then don't bother, i'll do the "hard way" hunting web...i just don't want waist anyone's time.
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      CommentAuthorlegendre
    • CommentTimeJul 29th 2011
     
    I don't know of any way (in Ubuntu) to remove all password requirements.. passwords and privilege separation are part & parcel to Linux and the POSIX/UNIX-like OS world.

    If you want to browse into directories and read files that are restricted, open a terminal window and type:

    sudo thunar (replace thunar with the name of your file manager, which I don't know) then input your password when asked.

    Be forewarned, you can cripple or completely destroy the system with one errant keypress - which is why you should NEVER run as root.