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      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeAug 14th 2013
     
    Psst, keep it under your hat.
  1.  
    Why?
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      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeAug 14th 2013
     
    Because that might indicate original thinking on your part, a very dangerous thing to do on this forum.
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    x equals lambda, donc Dieu existe.

    Oh sorry, not original, Doctor Who said that (without the god part).

    Anyway, I would like to have this gizmo. When I first thought of it, it was long ago at the time that the first DLP chips were coming out - the micromirror tech on a wafer, and the chip invented at HP and made by TI, if memory serves. I emailed the inventor (an HP Distinguished Fellow whose name now escapes me). I said I just wanted one of his cells, but upside down. Could he oblige? No reply, of course.
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    Posted By: TrimBecause that might indicate original thinking on your part, a very dangerous thing to do on this forum.
    What danger?

    Savage LULZ?

    Vicious reality checks?

    Deafening crickets?
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    I think he has in mind Robotic Hybrid Rabid 'Roos
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      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeAug 15th 2013
     
    Do you mind all my Roo-bots are house trained and guaranteed not to be rabid.
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      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeAug 15th 2013
     
    Po

    New approach assembles big structures from small interlocking pieces.

    http://phys.org/news/2013-08-approach-big-small-interlocking-pieces.html
    • CommentAuthorjoshs
    • CommentTimeAug 15th 2013
     
    Posted By: Andrew PalfreymanFor some time I've wanted to do a nano Woodward experiment. The idea is to mount a capacitor at the end of a vibrating rod, but replicated across a surface (wafer maybe). The rod is excited to resonance electrically, and the capacitor is independently accessible electrically for charging. That's a 2-input device, plus ground.
    What makes you think that such an arrangement can possibly do anything interesting? If you want to do cheap experiments with moderately high frequencies go get a device with an 802.11A/N/AC radio and direct it into a resonant cavity.
    • CommentAuthorjoshs
    • CommentTimeAug 15th 2013
     
    Posted By: TrimPo

    New approach assembles big structures from small interlocking pieces.

    http://phys.org/news/2013-08-approach-big-small-interlocking-pieces.html
    PO hype. Next week PO discovers flexures.
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    What makes you think that such an arrangement can possibly do anything interesting?
    Alien Smegma
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    Posted By: TrimPo

    New approach assembles big structures from small interlocking pieces.

    http://phys.org/news/2013-08-approach-big-small-interlocking-pieces.html
    So they should try to build a very very high tower with it already. That will get people's attention
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      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeAug 18th 2013
     
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      CommentAuthorDuracell
    • CommentTimeAug 18th 2013
     
    Posted By: TrimI

    Q. How hard can 3D printing really be? A. Quite hard.

    http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/gadgets-and-tech/features/q-how-hard-can-3d-printing-really-be-a-quite-hard-8761809.html


    Interesting article. The Makerbot Replicator 2 looks to me like it might have some really good mass market potential.

    I thought MY was reviewing the printer when I read this bit:

    From the article:So when Lulzbot, an American 3D printer maker approached me about spending a few months with their AO-101 printer – which was available for UK shipping earlier this year – I asked them to ship it over forthwith. Only to be slightly petrified when it arrived in a box almost the size of my spare room.
    After a few weeks of staring cagily at the box I was finally brave enough to take the Lulzbot on. We’re now in a place, mainly thanks to Apple, where 98 per cent of home electronics just work. You take them out of their box, plug them in, ignore a few lengthy legal disclaimers and whack – you’re away. We’re not quite there yet with 3D printers. Not only did the Lulzbot come with a lengthy instruction manual, but it even had instructions for how to unpack the bloody thing: “Holding the top two-tubes, SLOWLY pull the printer upwards out of the box.” That’s half of point 5. There are 12 steps just in the unpacking instructions. We’re not in Jobs-ville anymore, Toto.


    But after reading on for a bit it became obvious that this was not the case:

    From the article:But, if I can get the damn thing working armed mainly with patience, there’s no reason you couldn’t.
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      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeAug 25th 2013
     
    BBC

    'Spider style' blood vessel building.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-23793787
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      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeAug 26th 2013
     
    • CommentAuthorLakes
    • CommentTimeAug 26th 2013
     
    Posted By: TrimtE

    Nice one.

    Print me the head of Alfredo Garcia.

    http://www.economist.com/news/science-and-technology/21583238-new-low-cost-way-making-things-print-me-head-alfredo-garcia
    I like it, I`d like to see a video of this in operation.
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      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeAug 26th 2013 edited
     
    So would I it really stimulated my imagination and got me to do some postulating.

    Although it will probably be too expensive for home use.
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      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeSep 6th 2013
     
  7.  
    Posted By: TrimSo would I it really stimulated my imagination and got me to do some postulating.
    It's a filthy habit