Vanilla 1.1.9 is a product of Lussumo. More Information: Documentation, Community Support.

    •  
      CommentAuthormaryyugo
    • CommentTimeFeb 4th 2012 edited
     
    This time, it seems that a "confidential and proprietary" report has somehow made it to the internet -- whether a voluntary leak, an issue of how old it is or what isn't clear. The original link was on ecatnews.com. Here is the final summary:

    Rowan Scientists confirmed BLP‟s 1 kW and 50 kW power source tests corresponding to 20 kilojules and 1.0 megajoules respectively. Chemical analysis of the reactant and product R-Ni powder could account for less than 1% of the observed energy from known chemistry.


    http://www.rowan.edu/colleges/engineering/clinics/cleanenergy/pv/papers/pdf/files/paper7.pdf

    It's sort of a long read so before I do that, I'd appreciate Thicket's take on it because it seems as if all the heat could come from some sort of nickel-hydrogen reaction. They say no "chemical" source is possible but are Ni-H exothermic phenomena really "chemical" or are they more related to the physics of adsorption onto particles with large surface areas or what? Sorry -- I am ignorant about Ni-H physical or electrochemical reactions.

    By the way, again without looking at it in detail (so just from brief browsing) it seems they do proper flow calorimetry with proper calibration. Unless of course, they cheated. But there is nothing to suggest that and it would be pretty risky even for Rowan to do that.

    Somebody must be convinced there is some merit in this work -- not that that means much. But these guys must burn money pretty fast (BLP, not Rowan) and someone is providing it for a long time.
    • CommentAuthorjoshs
    • CommentTimeFeb 4th 2012
     
    Thicket ws IIRC one of the people whose criticisms caused that report to get pulled by Rowan.
    •  
      CommentAuthorDerrickA
    • CommentTimeFeb 4th 2012
     
    Posted By: maryyugoSomebody must be convinced there is some merit in this work -- not that that means much. But these guys must burn money pretty fast (BLP, not Rowan) and someone is providing it for a long time.


    My take is that BLP is to the USA, what Steorn is to Ireland... it's national "research" scam. If anything, Steorn was really a copycat of BLP, because BLP was first, and any damage BLP did, was ten times bigger. While I see it as a scam, I do hold an outside chance of it being a "hiding in plain sight" defense research type lab. With no verifiable shipping product, I'm certainly wondering (after 20 years) why it's "investors" haven't balked by now.
    •  
      CommentAuthormaryyugo
    • CommentTimeJul 11th 2016
     
    More BLP-BS:

    http://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20160711005351/en/Brilliant-Light-Power-Announces-Validation-Generation-Million

    Businesswire, of course, is often FOS. Interesting are the testimonials from "professors" who "validated" the results of BLP's "megawatt" demo.
    •  
      CommentAuthorThicket
    • CommentTimeJul 11th 2016
     
    Cripes. Not that idiot Peter Jansson again. I'd lost track of him. He's now at Cornell. A step up from Rowan University.

    It's been 5 - 7 years. since I posted an expose of Jansson on the now defunct Hydrino Study Group blog.

    My memory is a bit hazy, but here is a summary.

    * Jansson was an executive at Connectiv, a major power company.
    * Single-handed he got Connectiv to donate millions of dollars to Blacklight Power.
    * The company acknowledged they screwed up and fired Jansson.
    * Jansson remade himself as an academic. He spent a short time in England, then returned to the U.S. as an associate professor at the rinky-dink Rowan University.
    * He sponsored the first Rowan University study, funded by BLP, that showed anomalous heat presumably generated by the fictitious low-level energy hydrogen molecule.
    * Rowan's report was very obviously flawed. The source of the 'anomalous' heat was also obvious. It was the well-known heat generated when hydrogen is first exposed to nickel catalyst. Myself and another individual (I think his surname was Rabbit) wrote scathing reviews. The report disappeared.
    * Subsequent Rowan University reports contained less data making analysis impossible. They also didn't include Jansson's name although he was still a professor in the Chemical Engineering faculty.

    The BLP saga still attracts the attention of some newbies and presumably some dumb investors. BLP is like a festering wart that won't go away.
  1.  
    Nuke it from orbit. It's the only safe way
    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeJul 11th 2016 edited
     
    What the Rossians and Millsians fail to comprehend is that, absent any scientific theory, if the promoted thingummies really did produce vast amounts of energy, large interests would be pounding on the respective doors to get in on the deal.

    That it hasn't happened lends more credibility to scamming or delusion, than it does to scientific validity.

    But the disciples view their heroes as voices crying in the desert and will not be dissuaded.

    That's what blind faith leads you to. The followers refuse to understand that their "new fire" is little more than an ignis fatuus.
    •  
      CommentAuthormaryyugo
    • CommentTimeJul 11th 2016 edited
     
    Posted By: ThicketCripes. Not that idiot Peter Jansson again. I'd lost track of him. He's now at Cornell. A step up from Rowan University.

    It's been 5 - 7 years. since I posted an expose of Jansson on the now defunct Hydrino Study Group blog.

    My memory is a bit hazy, but here is a summary.

    * Jansson was an executive at Connectiv, a major power company.
    * Single-handed he got Connectiv to donate millions of dollars to Blacklight Power.
    * The company acknowledged they screwed up and fired Jansson.
    * Jansson remade himself as an academic. He spent a short time in England, then returned to the U.S. as an associate professor at the rinky-dink Rowan University.
    * He sponsored the first Rowan University study, funded by BLP, that showed anomalous heat presumably generated by the fictitious low-level energy hydrogen molecule.
    * Rowan's report was very obviously flawed. The source of the 'anomalous' heat was also obvious. It was the well-known heat generated when hydrogen is first exposed to nickel catalyst. Myself and another individual (I think his surname was Rabbit) wrote scathing reviews. The report disappeared.
    * Subsequent Rowan University reports contained less data making analysis impossible. They also didn't include Jansson's name although he was still a professor in the Chemical Engineering faculty.

    The BLP saga still attracts the attention of some newbies and presumably some dumb investors. BLP is like a festering wart that won't go away.


    Care to comment similarly in this string? You may want to outline your considerable qualifications briefly.

    https://www.lenr-forum.com/forum/index.php/Thread/3439-Brillliant-Light-Power-Posts-Demo-Video/?postID=28343#post28343

    Or if you prefer, I can quote you?
    •  
      CommentAuthorThicket
    • CommentTimeJul 11th 2016
     
    Maryyugo

    Feel free to quote me. BLP was an addiction that I prefer not to reignite. Compared to talking to believers, you have a better chance of acceptance from a rock.
    •  
      CommentAuthormaryyugo
    • CommentTimeJul 11th 2016
     
    Thanks, Thickie, Say again briefly your qualifications vis a vis hydrogen nickel reactions?
    •  
      CommentAuthormaryyugo
    • CommentTimeJul 11th 2016
     
    Asterix, may I quote you also?
    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeJul 11th 2016
     
    Posted By: maryyugoAsterix, may I quote you also?


    Sure, why not? Everyone in the LENR area thinks that I'm a pathoskeptic troll.
  2.  
    Here at the trap, "pathoskeptic" is a badge of honour
    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeJul 12th 2016
     
    Posted By: Andrew PalfreymanHere at the trap, "pathoskeptic" is a badge of honour


    Can't seem to keep it straight, however. Either I'm a pathoskeptic or skeptopathic.
    •  
      CommentAuthormaryyugo
    • CommentTimeJul 12th 2016
     
    I'm a quasipseudopathoskeptic.
  3.  
    I'm a peripatetiskeptic.
  4.  
    You deny the existence of motion?
    •  
      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeJul 12th 2016 edited
     
    No. It is another name for "Null-A".

    **rimshot**
  5.  
    I've had The Pawns in my collection for half a century; but I sadly don't see the joke
    •  
      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeJul 12th 2016
     
    It's a bit classical, but still - even Merriam remembers:

    per·i·pa·tet·ic
    ˌperēpəˈtedik/
    adjective
    1.
    traveling from place to place, especially working or based in various places for relatively short periods.
    "the peripatetic nature of military life"
    synonyms: nomadic, itinerant, traveling, wandering, roving, roaming, migrant, migratory, unsettled
    "I could never get used to her peripatetic lifestyle"
    2.
    Aristotelian.
    noun
    noun: peripatetic; plural noun: peripatetics; noun: Peripatetic; plural noun: Peripatetics
    1.
    a person who travels from place to place.
    2.
    an Aristotelian philosopher.