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  1.  
    There are ways to turn Mar-A-Largo into a port.
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      CommentAuthoralsetalokin
    • CommentTimeJul 22nd 2018 edited
     
    I think Uncle Vlad has that figured out already.

    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeAug 14th 2018
     
    I was thinking about the Orange Dotard and his view of Iran.

    In past lives, I've had business partners and friends that were Iranian. The Orange Dotard could learn a lot by spending a week among the people in Tehran. I found, in general, the Iranians to be very warm and friendly people. They operate under a religious dictatorship, so they are careful about what they say. But in my experience, they are painfully honest. They have a very ancient culture (thousands of years). I found the way to approach the Iranian culture was with respect and curiosity. Do that and you'll find open hearts.

    I've also had Indian and Chinese business partners, and in truth, I'd take the Iranians any day.

    I find it necessary to say this because of the utter vitriol I hear from the current occupant. He's simply ignorant. I'll wager that he doesn't even know that Farsi is an Indo-European language, not a Semitic one.

    Now, he's taking on the Turks. Egad, what a mess!
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeAug 14th 2018 edited
     
    I get the feeling that his whole approach sums up to "We've got the biggest army and the strongest economy - why not get something out of it?"

    I guess we won't be condemning the Turks for abusing the human rights of this USan clergyman.
    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeAug 14th 2018
     
    Yeah, 700 Gigadollars for defense.

    Stupid, stupid, stupid.
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      CommentAuthorDuracell
    • CommentTimeAug 14th 2018
     
    Posted By: AsterixI was thinking about the Orange Dotard and his view of Iran.

    In past lives, I've had business partners and friends that were Iranian. The Orange Dotard could learn a lot by spending a week among the people in Tehran. I found, in general, the Iranians to be very warm and friendly people. They operate under a religious dictatorship, so they are careful about what they say. But in my experience, they are painfully honest. They have a very ancient culture (thousands of years). I found the way to approach the Iranian culture was with respect and curiosity. Do that and you'll find open hearts.

    I've also had Indian and Chinese business partners, and in truth, I'd take the Iranians any day.

    I find it necessary to say this because of the utter vitriol I hear from the current occupant. He's simply ignorant. I'll wager that he doesn't even know that Farsi is an Indo-European language, not a Semitic one.

    Now, he's taking on the Turks. Egad, what a mess!


    From the language thread:

    Posted By: AngusRelated


    Ta’arof is a Persian word that has no English equivalent, referring to the art of etiquette ubiquitous in everyday Iranian life.

    “You go first,” says Mr A as he meets Mr B at the doorstep, as they try to enter a building. “No, it’s not possible, you go first,” Mr B insists in response. Ta’arof dictates a ritual that may see them both waiting for a couple of unnecessary minutes before one steps forward to enter.

    It is an etiquette that is seen almost in all aspects of Iranian life, from hosts insisting on guests taking more food from the table, to the exchanges in the bazaar. “How much is this carpet?” asks Ms A after choosing her favourite in the shop. “It’s worthless, you can just take it,” responds the seller, quite disingenuously.

    Although Ms A in reality cannot take the carpet out of the shop without paying for it, the seller might insist up to three times that she should just do that, until the amount of the price is finally mentioned.

    The awkward exchanges may have originated out of politeness; ultimately, they may work to the seller’s favour, as the buyer feels a certain obligation to respond to such deference with a purchase, even if the final price is more than she expected.

    Another example: you are walking with a friend and you end up doing Ta’arof, asking him to come to yours for lunch, even though you don’t have anything prepared and you don’t really want him to accept.

    The friend insists out of Ta’arof that he wouldn’t come because he knows you’re tired and doesn’t want to be a burden, even though deep down he really wants to have lunch at your place.

    “Oh, don’t Ta’arof,” you say in a Ta’arof asking your friend not to Ta’arof. He ends up accepting your reluctant Ta’arof. You’re a bit irked, but you’ll have to be all smiles. Not all Taa’rofs are insincere; some are, some aren’t. You’d Ta’arof even if you badly want something, saying you don’t want it; you’d Ta’arof if you really hate something, pretending you want it. Saeed Kamali Dehghan
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeAug 14th 2018
     
    Wee Donald is certainly shortening the reign of the USA as World Hegemon. But I'm not that keen on how the post-USA world is shaping up.

    700 Gigabux notwithstanding.
  2.  
    It will be truly pathetic to watch the USA begging for re-admittance into the world economic community, once Trump falls into the wastebasket of history.
    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeAug 14th 2018
     
    Posted By: DuracellTa’arof


    The ultimate Alphonse and Gaston paradigm.
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeAug 14th 2018
     
    Somehow more pleasant than the brash "After me, sucka!" now taking over some cultures.