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    Richard White, a professor of American history
    Design By Hairdresser. Next.
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    Posted By: duncan torusHow about this: emergency valves open to the outside atmosphere to re-pressurize the tube in case of emergency. Would also help slow down the pods coming up behind.
    Yes, I've posted this elsewhere. Therefore it's an excellent idea because it's MINE

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2dTh3iI0is8
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    Life support system? Sudden depressurization? **shudder** This is not an airplane that can descend! It's stuck where it is, how it is, and with another train closing in extremely fast from behind. What fun!

    You're behaving like a person with OCD and the comprehension skills of a long-dead roadkill. I've told you twice now that the following cars do not pose a threat. You can't follow the Newton reference and you don't know how to do the most elementary engineering calculations. I call Unqualified To Discuss.

    ETA This is a good example of why I favour the political system known informally as Informed Democracy. It prevents, for example, uninformed eeyore retarded people determining the fate of nuclear waste disposal, as they exercise their limbic systems in lieu of their almost non-existent cortices.
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      CommentAuthorDerrickA
    • CommentTimeAug 13th 2013
     
    Emergency re-pressurization valves would also require airlocks at regular intervals in a vacuuum tube, otherwise, the long tube would take a very long time to reach normal atmosphere. This introduces a whole new set of problems, including monitoring door status, and ensuring trains don't collide with a closed one.
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      CommentAuthorpcstru
    • CommentTimeAug 13th 2013
     
    Posted By: alsetalokinSo far I think my precooled ultracold capsule is the best idea. Naturally.


    Is there enough helium in the world to keep the loop in operation for it's 100 year lifespan?
    • CommentAuthorkorkskrew
    • CommentTimeAug 13th 2013
     
    Posted By: DerrickAEmergency re-pressurization valves would also require airlocks at regular intervals in a vacuuum tube, otherwise, the long tube would take a very long time to reach normal atmosphere. This introduces a whole new set of problems, including monitoring door status, and ensuring trains don't collide with a closed one.
    Not if the valves were located in each 100 ft segment.

    The tube would only be repressureized if there was a complete loss of cabin pressure in one of the cars. All other emergency scenarios are handled with the tube staying at 100 Pa. The braking to slow the car to a stop in 30 seconds would only be about 1.1G which wouldn't kill anyone and would only hurt those who weren't wearing their seat belt.
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    Anyone given any thought to emergency egress? The cars have standby propulsion in the form of deployable rubber wheels (or similar) so they can trundle along on these for a while. One expensive way is to provide exit stub tunnels every so many miles. I favour a more direct approach for this (hopefully rare) event. Fly in a helicopter crew and cut through the tube. Egress via ladder or sling. Re-weld tube. Re-de-pressurise tube. Shunt bad pod to next station.

    Oh, that's stupid. Just shunt the pod at low speed using the pod behind it.
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      CommentAuthorDerrickA
    • CommentTimeAug 13th 2013
     
    Airbags might be a good way to seal off a section of tube. The train could carry a couple front and back, with extras spaced at regular intervals in the tube itself.
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      CommentAuthoralsetalokin
    • CommentTimeAug 13th 2013 edited
     
    Posted By: pcstru
    Posted By: alsetalokinSo far I think my precooled ultracold capsule is the best idea. Naturally.


    Is there enough helium in the world to keep the loop in operation for it's 100 year lifespan?

    The helium isn't consumed, it just leaks away like helium does. Mostly it's recycled: vaporizing to carry heat away from your capsule and recondensed in giant but fixed-base condensers and liquification pumps. You get the energy to run these from eddy-current braking (or linear alternators) of the hurtling superconducting capsules. But that is an engineering problem that is easy to solve, compared to pumping down a 5000 km long steel tube and expecting it to remain dimensionally stable when one end of it is in a hailstorm, another section passes through a desert, and so on.
    And you get all the helium you need from LENR reactors anyhow, so what's the problem?
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      CommentAuthormaryyugo
    • CommentTimeAug 13th 2013 edited
     
    Posted By: duncan torus[repressurizing] Would also help slow down the pods coming up behind.
    It certainly would. So would coming up against a mountain. Ever see what happens when someone ejects from an aicraft at near supersonic speeds? That's what would happen to the following cars. They would stop OK and so would all the fiery fragments. Eventually.

    Posted By: Andrew PalfreymanAnyone given any thought to emergency egress?
    Of course not. Spoils the illusion.

    An egresse:


    BTW, Andrew, who is this obscure guy Newton you keep talking about? What does he have to do with this silliness? I don't recall seeing calculations anywhere about the deceleration necessary to stop one of these trains before it hits a stalled one. Or the acceptable reaction time for the braking mechanism (uh... what braking mechanism? these things are free floating in the tube).
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    Posted By: DerrickAAirbags might be a good way to seal off a section of tube. The train could carry a couple front and back, with extras spaced at regular intervals in the tube itself.
    Yes, I had thought of localising the air pressure too. Remember that every pod carries a supply of pressurised air, so this alone might be adequate. Also, if the disabled pod still has working wheels (and why not?) it can get itself to the next exit point under its own steam, as opposed to being shunted. I think the max speed in this backup mode is around 100 mph. Not too shabby.
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    Posted By: maryyugo
    Posted By: duncan torus[repressurizing] Would also help slow down the pods coming up behind.
    It certainly would. So would coming up against a mountain. Ever see what happens when someone ejects from an aicraft at near supersonic speeds? That's what would happen to the following cars. They would stop OK and so would all the fiery fragments. Eventually.

    Posted By: Andrew PalfreymanAnyone given any thought to emergency egress?
    Of course not. Spoils the illusion.

    An egresse:


    BTW, Andrew, who is this obscure guy Newton you keep talking about? What does he have to do with this silliness? I don't recall seeing calculations anywhere about the deceleration necessary to stop one of these trains before it hits a stalled one. Or the acceptable reaction time for the braking mechanism (uh... what braking mechanism? these things are free floating in the tube).
    Can you recommend a decent hair gel for split ends? Do you have that sort of trouble? And what about brittle nails?
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      CommentAuthorDerrickA
    • CommentTimeAug 13th 2013
     
    Emergency egress? In the train, explosive panels made with shaped charges could punch out a "door" at almost any point in the pipe. Special forces have used this technology for decades, though usually to get in, rather than out.
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      CommentAuthoralsetalokin
    • CommentTimeAug 13th 2013 edited
     
    Let's see: the pod has a 300 L water reservoir, a steam plumbing system with pressurised steam pumps and a completely insulated steamtrunk, and it has emergency extendable wheels and mechanisms, an engine and fuel or batteries and motors of its own, and a compressed air tank. And it has a lifesupport system that will maintain the innards at comfy cozy temps, pressures and sound levels. And a seat and an entertainment system. And hatches and bumpers and a cargo compartment at least big enough for a folding bicycle.

    Right?

    Oh, and the explosive egress system to blow out the tube wall in an emergency, forgot about that.
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    Right!!

    Party time!
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      CommentAuthormaryyugo
    • CommentTimeAug 13th 2013
     
    Each pod will be about the size of the Costa Concordia.
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    Posted By: maryyugo

    An egresse:




    Are you sure that's not a crane?

    You might need cranes, as well as egresses, standing by at all times.

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    4.5. Safety and Reliability
    [....]For additional redundancy, all Hyperloop capsules would be fitted with a mechanical braking system to bring capsules safely to a stop.
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    Hah.... snicker. So it's got cleats or something, or maybe a drogue balloon that inflates against the walls and drags it to a stop. And cannot possibly get stuck in the "brake on" position. (Imagine a 5000 km long tube with a trapped, braked capsule inside every km or so.)
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    Here's what I think happens when there is a tube fault or a capsule malfunction, braking system or not: everybody in the entire tube dies.