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  1.  
    Posted By: Angus
    Posted By: Andrew Palfreymanphotons begin to scatter


    Off what? Photons are bosons and don't scatter off each other.
    Apparently at insanely high energies, that's exactly what begins to happen. I can dig up a reference if you insist
  2.  
    Well, I'm filing a complaint with the Society of Hypothetical Observers. I hope I can get it in before the deadline...
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeOct 28th 2013 edited
     
    I think you mean high fluxes. Photon-photon scattering is a virtual particle interaction in which the photons are coupled to the particles. Estimates seem to be that LHC might produce about 20 per year. You are going to need one helluva lot of photons. When you've assembled those we can talk.
  3.  
    Yes, high fluxes. Yes, it's a bad idea to hold your breath on this one. But I wonder what would in fact happen. A necklace of black holes sounds funky.
    • CommentAuthortinker
    • CommentTimeOct 28th 2013
     
    Can you make a black hole out of something (I though was) massless?
  4.  
    Yes, because of E = m c2. It is energy that bends spacetime, if you want to put it that way.
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeOct 28th 2013 edited
     
    Energy and mass are the same thing. I guess if you could get enough photons to be in the same place you could make a black hole. Unfortunately photons are always travelling at the speed of light, so timing is critical.
  5.  
    Except potential energy. That doesn't bend spacetime.
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeOct 28th 2013
     
    Hmmm...if you mean gravitational potential energy then you have to move masses apart to create it, and that does bend spacetime since the masses are now in different places. If you mean potential against the strong force, sure it does: nuclear isomers have different masses.

    ... [by mass spectroscopy] it is now possible to resolve isomers independently from their associated groundstate, a direct proof of E=mc2
    .

    Ref

    I never heard of an experimental apparatus able to distinguish the masses of different electronic excitations of an atom and thus demonstrate mass stored in the electric field, but I'm sure it's there.
  6.  
    I'm glad to be contradicted here, one reason being it's unsatisfying to have to subdivide energy into categories. Doesn't make sense (which is why I mentioned it).

    Great stuff
    •  
      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeOct 28th 2013
     
    NW

    Quantum reality more complex than previously thought.

    http://www.nanowerk.com/news2/newsid=32958.php
  7.  
    Ever get the impression that we're looking at the quantum realm in the wrong way?
    •  
      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeOct 29th 2013
     
    Every time my answer isn't the same as the one in the back of the book.
  8.  
    Well, I did mean a tad more generally than that
    •  
      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeOct 29th 2013
     
    I've got a pretty big book.
    •  
      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeOct 29th 2013
     
    Stop boasting.
    • CommentAuthorLakes
    • CommentTimeOct 29th 2013
     
    Angus throws his (BIG) book at trim. :D
    •  
      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeOct 29th 2013
     
    Theory lives in the front of the book and reality lives in the back. We call that a paradigm.
    •  
      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeOct 29th 2013
     
    It's only an Ebook anyway.
  9.  
    Paradigms will get you a cup of coffee