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  1.  
    32 picoCoulombs per meter of axon.

    See page 8:
    http://isnap.nd.edu/Lectures/mphysics/Medical%20Physics/Part%20I.%20Physics%20of%20the%20Body/Chapter%206.%20Electrical%20System%20of%20the%20Body/6.1%20Physics%20of%20the%20nervous%20system/Physics%20of%20the%20nervous%20system.pdf

    There are about 176,000 km (176,000,000 m) of axon in a standard 20 yo human male.
    http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/the-new-brain/201106/brain-wiring

    So I get around 5.6 milliCoulomb for the total axonal charge in a body. A not inconsiderable charge. If I haven't dropped a decimal somewhere.
    •  
      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeApr 24th 2013
     
    ok i take your point. Obviously if you specify both a field and a distance over which you can find this field then you can calculate a charge which will produce it.But these guys were talking about an electric field as if it were the same thing as an electric charge.
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeApr 24th 2013 edited
     
    Thinking about it more - the cell membrane seems to have at least the dielectric strength of extruded teflon or fused silica. That's pretty impressive. Trim might want to consider making supercapacitors out of criminals.
    • CommentAuthorjoshs
    • CommentTimeApr 24th 2013
     
    Posted By: alsetalokin
    Posted By: Angus
    Posted By: joshsThe field they applied was enormous: 650E6 V/m.


    And they called it a "charge". Add that in with confusing power and energy.


    Thickness of an average neuronal cell membrane: 5 nanometers
    Voltage difference between outside and inside of a neuron: around 100 - 150 milliVolts
    Breakdown voltage of dry air is around 3E6V/m. 650E6V/m easily means lightning bolts through dry air.
    •  
      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeApr 25th 2013
     
    Posted By: AngusThinking about it more - the cell membrane seems to have at least the dielectric strength of extruded teflon or fused silica. That's pretty impressive. Trim might want to consider making supercapacitors out of criminals.


    Thanks for volunteering, but I think I will miss you to much.
    Can you get joshs to volunteer instead?

    Po

    'Quantum internet': Towards realization of solid-state quantum network
    •  
      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeApr 25th 2013
     
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      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeApr 26th 2013
     
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      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeJun 5th 2013 edited
     
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      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeJul 20th 2013
     
    YT

    The Quantum Conspiracy: What Popularizers of QM Don't Want You to know.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dEaecUuEqfc&feature=em-subs_digest-vrecs&html5=1



    NW

    Probing single-molecule magnets with carbon nanotube NEMS.

    http://www.nanowerk.com/spotlight/spotid=31441.php

    Searching for quantum physics in all the right places

    http://www.nanowerk.com/news2/newsid=31438.php
  2.  
    The 3rd link is very good. There's another paper published almost contemporaneously that comes up with pretty much the same idea. One key observation, using this new protocol, is that plants do indeed exploit entangled quantum states in photosynthesis, despite the environment being at room temperature. By deconstructing this in detail, we may well learn how to put together a workable quantum computer without using low temperatures.
  3.  
    Or turn sunlight into electricity with 80% efficiency.
  4.  
    Doh to myself! You have hit the nail on the head.
    •  
      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeJul 20th 2013
     
    Posted By: magic momentOr turn sunlight into electricity with 80% efficiency.


    As opposed to the current sub-ten-percent efficiency of photosynthesis?
  5.  
    Posted By: Angus
    Posted By: magic momentOr turn sunlight into electricity with 80% efficiency.


    As opposed to the current sub-ten-percent efficiency of photosynthesis?
    Oops, right again. 3 to 6%
    •  
      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeJul 21st 2013 edited
     
    Nature is not always the most efficient. However when she is not, it is wisetoaskwhy. In this case I suspect it tells us something about evolution, and specifically, the limits of where you can go given where you start (goop based on proteins and sugars in our case).
    • CommentAuthortinker
    • CommentTimeJul 21st 2013
     
    The thing about plants is that they have very good energy storage systems...and of course in the adult phase they are sessile. That is a big energy saver - as many a couch-potato could testify.
  6.  
    Pour a capful of spirulina or chlorella into your koi pond, come back and check it in a week and then tell me if anyone cares that algae are only 8 percent efficient photosynthesizers.




    You might lose a bit in every transaction, but you make it up in volume.
  7.  
    Posted By: tinkerand of course in the adult phase they are sessile

    If they have enough sense, that is. It's when they try to get up and walk around that you need to worry.
  8.  
    That's the root of the problem
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeJul 21st 2013
     
    Posted By: alsetalokinPour a capful of spirulina or chlorella into your koi pond, come back and check it in a week and then tell me if anyone cares that algae are only 8 percent efficient photosynthesizers.




    You might lose a bit in every transaction, but you make it up in volume.


    AngusCorp has a programme to breed silicon solar cells from our new AnglassLife(TM) matrix. Stay tuned.