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    I imagine that's the time taken to produce all of the bits, added together. If you had a bunch of 3D printers all running in parallel it would reduce the time to whatever the time taken to make the biggest piece was. It's still stupid though.

    Reading between the lines of article suggests that the car derives all of it's safety and probably a great deal of it's rigidity from the steel roll cage/space frame. Which obviously isn't printed. Neither is the engine or drive train. A unkind person might suggest that none of the important bits of the 'car' have anything to with 3D printing.

    The article also makes a big deal of the 1,200 pounds kerb weight. For a 3 wheeled toy, with a tiny engine, that's in no way impressive. It's about the same as a Morgan 3-wheeler.
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      CommentAuthormaryyugo
    • CommentTimeFeb 28th 2013
     
    A hallmark of bad design is when you can't tell which end goes first when it's on the road. The article is a monument of bad writing. What does this mean, for example:

    the prototype will produce a maximum of 10 horsepower. Most of the driving – from zero to 40 mph – will be done by the 36-volt electric motor. When it gets up to highway speeds, the engine will tap the fuel tank to power a diesel engine.
    Elsewhere they say it's ethanol powered. Make up your mind. I think it's intended to be flying pig powered.
    • CommentAuthorjoshs
    • CommentTimeFeb 28th 2013
     
    Posted By: AngusThat's the whole problem with "3D printing". It reverts from parallel manufacturing, like printing, to serial manufacturing, like manual copying. It should be called "3D writing" to honour truth in naming.

    I am imagining a modern automobile production monastery, with the mechanical scribes scribbling out auto parts in the dimly lit scriptorium, while the abbot reads from the gospels.

    It's a prototyping and tooling technology - that's all.
    Stereolithography is a fantastic prototyping, and more and more hobby technology. I am 100% with you despite your maple syrup hoarding ways that for mass manufacture it is a step into the deep past.
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeFeb 28th 2013
     
    Posted By: pcstru
    Posted By: Angus
    It's a prototyping and tooling technology - that's all.


    At the moment maybe. In another 10-20 years, no.


    How do you reproduce the production rates of, say, forging or casting if you have to put the part together voxel by voxel?
    • CommentAuthorjoshs
    • CommentTimeFeb 28th 2013
     
    Posted By: BigOilRepSo why don't car manufacturers already build cars from plastic?

    I'm also confused as to what this has to do with printing?
    Plastic is used where it is cheaper and more practical than other materials like: steel, aluminum, and glass.
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      CommentAuthormaryyugo
    • CommentTimeFeb 28th 2013
     
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      CommentAuthormaryyugo
    • CommentTimeFeb 28th 2013
     
    While we're on cars, Volvo discovers intelligent headlights... maybe because cars aren't complex enough yet.

    http://www.wired.com/autopia/2013/02/volvo-permanent-high-beams/
    • CommentAuthorjoshs
    • CommentTimeFeb 28th 2013
     
    Posted By: Angus
    Posted By: pcstru
    Posted By: Angus
    It's a prototyping and tooling technology - that's all.


    At the moment maybe. In another 10-20 years, no.


    How do you reproduce the production rates of, say, forging or casting if you have to put the part together voxel by voxel?
    I can see that if someone were to come up with a very efficient high powered UV light source that the old style stereolithograph processes where the platen sinks into a vat of liquid polymer might become competitive for short run parts.
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeFeb 28th 2013
     
    Inside is an electric drivetrain made from bio-composite materials,


    What do you suppose one of those is?
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeFeb 28th 2013
     
    Posted By: hairykrishnaI imagine that's the time taken to produce all of the bits, added together. If you had a bunch of 3D printers all running in parallel it would reduce the time to whatever the time taken to make the biggest piece was. It's still stupid though.


    But - cost? I need X 3-D printers to match the speed of one drop-forge.
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      CommentAuthormaryyugo
    • CommentTimeFeb 28th 2013
     
    • CommentAuthorjoshs
    • CommentTimeFeb 28th 2013
     
    Now all they need are velvet backdrops, a big breasted woman, and a tiger.
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      CommentAuthorpcstru
    • CommentTimeFeb 28th 2013
     
    Posted By: Angus
    Posted By: pcstru
    Posted By: Angus
    It's a prototyping and tooling technology - that's all.


    At the moment maybe. In another 10-20 years, no.


    How do you reproduce the production rates of, say, forging or casting if you have to put the part together voxel by voxel?


    I don't think you do, I don't think it is necessary. What happens is production moves from large factories with worldwide distribution, to worldwide production. Lower cost of production will mean smaller companies able to produce product at costs that compete with large manufacturers.
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      CommentAuthorpcstru
    • CommentTimeFeb 28th 2013
     
    Posted By: BigOilRepSo why don't car manufacturers already build cars from plastic?


    More and more car parts are plastic and in high performance cars carbon fibre replaced metal a long time ago. "3D printing" is using increasingly diverse materials, including metals. But it *is* early days - I'd liken the situation to personal computers in the mid/late 70's. But 3d print technology will advance quicker over the next 20 years (more materials, more combined material deposition, finishing options etc).
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeFeb 28th 2013
     
    Posted By: pcstruproduction moves from large factories with worldwide distribution, to worldwide production. Lower cost of production will mean smaller companies able to produce product at costs that compete with large manufacturers.


    Unless the reduced cost of distribution outweighs the increased cost of more factories (and more distribution of input material to them), that won't work.
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeFeb 28th 2013
     
    Here's a thought.

    Is there a market for 3-D printed books?
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      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeFeb 28th 2013
     
    Be careful you might give away my T ray book scanner idea, after all the NDA's I got you to sign.
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeFeb 28th 2013
     
    Wavelengths are too long to resolve the print. But a book consisting of many pages of blur might suit some people.
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      CommentAuthorpcstru
    • CommentTimeFeb 28th 2013
     
    Posted By: Angus
    Posted By: pcstruproduction moves from large factories with worldwide distribution, to worldwide production. Lower cost of production will mean smaller companies able to produce product at costs that compete with large manufacturers.


    Unless the reduced cost of distribution outweighs the increased cost of more factories (and more distribution of input material to them), that won't work.


    The factories are much smaller and much cheaper. You eliminate most of the capital tied up in stock and increase your responsiveness / time to market for new models. Distribution of raw materials will be like food - everybody will need fab feed.

    I think someone could clean up now competing with the likes of IKEA - manufacturing on site products that customers are custom designing as they shop in the store. They wouldn't be picking up flat packs from a huge stock room, their exact request would be being machined on the CNC line from common stock. 3d printing builds on that model. People don't all want EXACTLY the same thing.

    In a few years those tall city cranes that you see sprouting up in impossible spaces in cities will be shuffling around a print head - and skyscrapers will grow, layer by layer, pixels of concrete, steel and plastic deposited fused together into hugely strong configurations that are impossible today.

    In the late 70's I put a pixel on a screen and made it move as if under my control. People laughed at me when I told them they would be hard pressed in the future to distinguish a computer generated image from an honest photograph of a real situation. In the early twenty tenties (ha!) my pixels have real physical substance. At the moment they are small plastic blobs (green pixels), in the future it won't just be color that I can manipulate, it will be what they are made of.
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      CommentAuthorpcstru
    • CommentTimeFeb 28th 2013
     
    Is this my woo moment? Where I discover my inner woo?