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    • CommentAuthorLakes
    • CommentTimeMar 10th 2013
     
    Get the cost down and make it easier for joe bloggs to use, like a scanner/printer.
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      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeMar 10th 2013
     
    Build your own one.
    • CommentAuthortinker
    • CommentTimeMar 10th 2013 edited
     
    • CommentAuthorLakes
    • CommentTimeMar 10th 2013
     
    Clanzer builds awesome stuff, but its not cheap (then again you pay for quality).
    • CommentAuthortinker
    • CommentTimeMar 10th 2013
     
    Not the cheapest - but it is very high quality - a quantum leap better than the chinese-made stuff. He has been attracting some very high-profile clients. too. Compare the price and capability of his CNC machines to the market-leader in the same class (Proxxon) and you will see the difference.
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      CommentAuthorDuracell
    • CommentTimeMar 10th 2013
     
    Posted By: tinkerOr get one from Clanzer.
    http://www.ukcnc.info/forums/dprinter.php
    Cool!
    • CommentAuthortinker
    • CommentTimeMar 11th 2013
     
  1.  
    Can I run that on my Arduino?
    • CommentAuthorLakes
    • CommentTimeMar 11th 2013
     
    Posted By: alsetalokinCan I run that on my Arduino?
    Maybe if you overclock it. ;)
    • CommentAuthorthehard
    • CommentTimeMar 12th 2013
     
    3d printing is the consequence of a generation that handles C++ better than a hammer and a saw.
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeMar 12th 2013
     
    Ha!
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      CommentAuthormaryyugo
    • CommentTimeMar 12th 2013
     
  2.  
    I am not even gonna click on that.
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      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeMar 12th 2013
     
    Do they use rat cams to spy on cream cakes?
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      CommentAuthorpcstru
    • CommentTimeJul 15th 2013 edited
     
    I thought this was interesting :


    "Nasa said the component would normally have taken a year to make because of the exact measurements involved, but by using SLM the manufacturing time was cut to less than four months and the price reduced by more than 70%."


    There was also a comment on some radio prog at the weekend by some long term planners/investor types which said people tend to overestimate the rate at which new technology will be adopted but they also underestimate the eventual impact. The example given was mobile phones were they predicted a sharper take-up in the following year but sized the entire market for Ireland at a couple of hundred thousand phones.

    A lot of the things we currently use every day are probably the way they are because of the manufacturing processes available. Things that are possible with additive manufacturing technology are impossible to make with traditional processes. That won't always require huge accuracy to innovate in the product design, so it will be possible to use 3d printed components to significantly improve the function of (say) a washing machine. You will start to see mass manufacturing of parts via 3d printers in consumer products and that will be the beginning of the change for the entire manufacturing process of such things. The small 12mm-72.5deg bend-10.5mm pipe that has to be fabricated by the local injection moulding company - that will be as convenient to print up since you already bought in the capacity to print endless small plastic parts. It also makes the whole market for (say) a pump, more flexible. You don't need the injection moulding company to run up a whole production cycle and commit to 10,000 parts, change costs you nothing so you can switch motor supplier and take advantage of new/cheaper/better component products much quicker. You can't not do that, because your competitiveness will suffer and you will die.

    So somewhere 3d printing technology must be a good investment measured over the next 10-20 years. Find me stock!
    • CommentAuthorkorkskrew
    • CommentTimeJul 15th 2013
     
    GE is making jet engine fuel injectors the same way, and for the same reasons.
  3.  
    It is already revolutionizing manufacturing, and the increasing presence of good printers in home shops and labs and even kitchens is going to spawn new cottage industries as well. Perhaps the whole "model" will change, and people will be printing the things they need rather than buying them preprinted at PrintMart.

    Hey..... Kinko's business model only with 3d printers instead of copy machines...... stop off at the PrintMart on the way home Honey and pick up a few things....
  4.  
    It has the potential to free up those who like particular styles that aren't particularly practical. Baroque kitchenware. Alien-ware tea kettles, Giger-style salt and pepper shakers. Stuff like that which would cost a fortune if bought as custom.
  5.  
    Yep.
    3-d printing is the new "plastics" for a generation of Graduates.
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeJul 15th 2013 edited
     
    “A lot of the current hyperbole seems to suggest that AM will replace everything. It will not,” said Stuart MacLachlan, project manager at the U.K.’s Additive Manufacturing Special Interest Group, a government-backed group created by the country’s Technology Strategy Board. Still, “it has great potential to make an impact on specific areas of small-series manufacturing, and in cases where unusual material combinations or shapes are needed,” he said.


    From the feature article on it by TIm Hayes in Optics and Photonics News, Aug 2013.