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    • CommentAuthortinker
    • CommentTimeJul 15th 2013
     
    I think he (McClachlan) is wrong on this. When CNC machines were first introduced into many industries they were reserved for 'specials' and short runs. As the machines got cheaper and windows-based operating systems replaced the clunky Fanuc go-code man-machine interface CNC shapers, punching/boring machines and lathes became more versatile and more easily programmed on the shop floor. Now they are used for almost everything, in fact it is hard to find a machine shop that does centre lathe turning or capstan work anywhere west of Dacca.
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    Bullshit. It will replace _everything_. You just wait and see. In three years you will be able to print your own contact lenses, Spam sandwiches and even wiring harnesses for your electrauto.
    • CommentAuthorjoshs
    • CommentTimeJul 15th 2013
     
    I agree with that assessment. It will make economically possible all manner of one off or short run items that were not economically or practically feasible by machining or molds. It will make a number of components possible that may have very interesting implications. But mass production still follows the hierarchy of: Lithography as cheapest, and complex assembly as the most expensive.
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    Spectacle frames spring to mind.
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeJul 15th 2013
     
    Posted By: joshsBut mass production still follows the hierarchy of: Lithography as cheapest, and complex assembly as the most expensive.


    It isn't printing if there is more than one operation to make the output.

    It is calligraphy.
    • CommentAuthorjoshs
    • CommentTimeJul 15th 2013
     
    Posted By: alsetalokinBullshit. It will replace _everything_. You just wait and see. In three years you will be able to print your own contact lenses, Spam sandwiches and even wiring harnesses for your electrauto.
    It's a printing technology. We can take clues from 2D printing. We do not see 2,000,000 nozzle printers printing magazines and newspapers for good reason.

    3D is going to be a good sized industry. It is not going to displace other manufacturing technologies. It is going to augment them, especially in the short run space.

    Tinker: Automobile manufacturing is probably the toughest supply chain in the world. Auto manufacturers still tool $2 million dollar body panel molds for good reason.
    • CommentAuthorjoshs
    • CommentTimeJul 15th 2013
     
    Posted By: Andrew PalfreymanSpectacle frames spring to mind.
    The Optigrab(r) was a dangerous product.
    • CommentAuthortinker
    • CommentTimeJul 15th 2013
     
    But how do they make the panel moulds...? Using CNC machinery is how. The days of mould-makers scraping and filing press tools are long gome.
    • CommentAuthorjoshs
    • CommentTimeJul 15th 2013
     
    Posted By: tinkerBut how do they make the panel moulds...? Using CNC machinery is how. The days of mould-makers scraping and filing press tools are long gome.
    They were gone in the USA by the 1940s. The difference now is the automation.
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      CommentAuthorpcstru
    • CommentTimeJan 7th 2014 edited
     
    • CommentAuthorloreman
    • CommentTimeJan 8th 2014
     
    In fact, after tootling around the Land of the Long White Cloud for a couple of weeks, I have come to realise that Sonoboy is in error-the Universe is not a simulation running on a computer. It is obviously 4d printed.
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeJan 8th 2014
     
    Posted By: loremanIn fact, after tootling around the Land of the Long White Cloud for a couple of weeks, I have come to realise that Sonoboy is in error-the Universe is not a simulation running on a computer. It is obviously4d printed.


    Say hello to Aotearoa for me. Do they still talk funny?
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      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeJan 9th 2014
     
    NW

    OWL Nano Achieves 100 Nanometer Resolution in Desktop 3D Printing.

    http://www.nanowerk.com/nanotechnology_news/newsid=33897.php
    • CommentAuthorloreman
    • CommentTimeJan 9th 2014
     
    Posted By: Angus
    Posted By: loremanIn fact, after tootling around the Land of the Long White Cloud for a couple of weeks, I have come to realise that Sonoboy is in error-the Universe is not a simulation running on a computer. It is obviously4d printed.


    Say hello to Aotearoa for me. Do they still talk funny?


    Back now, but the fush are still funny over there
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      CommentAuthorpcstru
    • CommentTimeOct 26th 2014 edited
     
    Open Space Agency offering up a sort of crowdsourced giant array telescope.
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    • CommentAuthorLakes
    • CommentTimeDec 1st 2014
     
    Posted By: pcstruOpen Space Agencyoffering up a sort of crowdsourced giant array telescope.
    Beta testers required, interested Al? :)
    • CommentAuthorLakes
    • CommentTimeDec 1st 2014
     
    Posted By: Andrew Palfreymanhttp://www.technologyreview.com/news/532816/3-d-printing-bio-electronic-parts/

    Now LEDs too
    We are Borg, resistance is printable.
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      CommentAuthoralsetalokin
    • CommentTimeDec 1st 2014 edited
     
    Posted By: Lakes
    Posted By: pcstruOpen Space Agencyoffering up a sort of crowdsourced giant array telescope.
    Beta testers required, interested Al? :)


    Uh... Slick website and nice graphics but as an amateur astrophotographer myself, I have some pretty strong doubts that anyone will be able to make "professional grade" deep sky photographs with that kit. I can't quite figure out the mount system, whether it's polar-equatorial or alt-azimuth, looks kind of like a modified Dobsonian.

    The optics design looks like ordinary Newtonian reflector. The 20-inch mirror version with a frame made of printed plastic is a joke. Check out what a real, 20-inch mirror Newt on a Dobsonian mount looks like:



    Actually that's just a 17 incher. Note the trusswork for rigidity and the _heavy_ base for stability. Even so, a scope like this is still not suited for deep-sky, long exposure photography. It's great for short exposures of bright objects. One of the best view of the Orion nebula I've seen with my own eyes was at the eyepiece of a 24 inch Obsession Dobs-- I had to climb up a ladder to get to the eyepiece. It was great. The owner transports it to viewing sites in a specially-modified horse trailer.

    I didn't see anything on the website that talked about a giant array telescope. I'm putting this one down as "pie in the sky", although the 3 1/2 inch one would probably be good for comet hunting from a _dark_ backyard.

    Maybe I'm just jealous. Send me the kit for the 20 incher, with the parts already printed since I don't have a printer, and I'll evaluate it.
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      CommentAuthorpcstru
    • CommentTimeDec 1st 2014
     
    Posted By: alsetalokinI didn't see anything on the website that talked about a giant array telescope. I'm putting this one down as "pie in the sky", although the 3 1/2 inch one would probably be good for comet hunting from a _dark_ backyard.


    It is there. I think the idea is that the individual scopes are just a node in an array of scopes - the data is sent to a central repository and many individual frames from widely separated scopes are processed into a single, final image.