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      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeOct 1st 2020
     
    Driverless taxis now for hire in Shanghai.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/av/business-54379914
    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeOct 1st 2020
     
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      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeOct 16th 2020
     
    "Better" copper means higher-efficiency electric motors.

    https://revolution-green.com/better-copper-means-higher-efficiency-electric-motors/
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      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeOct 21st 2020
     
    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeOct 21st 2020
     
    GM getting into the act

    This is a hopeful sign.
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      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeOct 22nd 2020
     
    Chameleon unveiled as Europe's first 3D printed vehicle.

    https://www.theengineer.co.uk/scaled-chameleon-3d-printed-vehicle/


    Wow grannies will love this.
  1.  
    https://www.theverge.com/2021/7/21/22585682/electric-vehicles-greenhouse-gas-emissions-lifecycle-assessment

    Even EVs that plug into dirty grids emit fewer greenhouse gases than gas-powered cars
  2.  
    The report estimates the emissions from medium-sized EVs registered in 2021 in either India, China, the US, or Europe — countries that make up 70 percent of new car sales globally and are representative of other markets across the world, the ICCT says. Lifetime emissions for an EV in Europe are between 66 and 69 percent lower compared to that of a gas-guzzling vehicle, the analysis found. In the US, an EV produces between 60 to 68 percent fewer emissions. In China, which uses more coal, an EV results in between 37 to 45 percent fewer emissions. In India, it’s between 19 to 34 percent lower.
    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeJul 21st 2021 edited
     
    x percent fewer emissions as what part of the whole?

    In other words, in China and India, what portion of total GHG emissions do ICE automobiles emit? China burns vast amounts of coal.
  3.  
    Magnitude not as important as sign - don't miss the woods for the trees. The message is clear.
    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeJul 22nd 2021 edited
     
    Trends are more important, to wit:

    After the OPEC oil embargo of the 1970s, a bunch of US federal legislative measures were passed, including the EnergyStar program, assistance and tax credits for energy efficiency (e.g. free energy audits, grants for weatherization, upgrades to heating, etc.). There was a slight dip in the 1980s, but that was after a peak. In 1961, US per-capita energy consumption was roughly 5600 kg of oil equivalent, in 1978 it peaked at about 8400 kg, dropped to 7200 kg in in 1983 and today is 6800 kg and rising, so about where we were in 1967. What with LED lighting, and more efficient appliances, we haven't seen much of an impact. One can but speculate that consumption will continue to increase to offset the effects of climate change.

    Contrast this with China, 465 kg in 1971; 2240 kg in 2014 and rising fast.

    My point is that whatever gains you make in lower GHG emissions will be swamped out by increasing demand. We have to deal with the developing world, who want their slice of the cake.

    Do you think that telling the Chinese, Indians or Africans that they can't have any cake is realistic?
  4.  
    Bwana had his day in the sun. It would be ungracious to deny the same to others.

    Although an army of white slaves might not resonate too well.
    • CommentAuthorBigOilRep
    • CommentTimeJul 22nd 2021
     
    Posted By: AsterixIn other words, in China and India, what portion of total GHG emissions do ICE automobiles emit? China burns vast amounts of coal.

    And plans to keep doing so. Their big push to EVs China is about cleaning up the air in their cities and becoming a "modern" economy. Reducing CO2 output is not their primary concern.

    Despite Pledges to Cut Emissions, China Goes on a Coal Spree

    Coal remains at the heart of China’s flourishing economy. In 2019, 58 percent of the country’s total energy consumption came from coal, which helps explain why China accounts for 28 percent of all global CO2 emissions. And China continues to build coal-fired power plants at a rate that outpaces the rest of the world combined. In 2020, China brought 38.4 gigawatts of new coal-fired power into operation, more than three times what was brought on line everywhere else.


    A total of 247 gigawatts of coal power is now in planning or development, nearly six times Germany’s entire coal-fired capacity. China has also proposed additional new coal plants that, if built, would generate 73.5 gigawatts of power, more than five times the 13.9 gigawatts proposed in the rest of the world combined. Last year, Chinese provinces granted construction approval to 47 gigawatts of coal power projects, more than three times the capacity permitted in 2019.
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeJul 22nd 2021 edited
     
    I redid my earlier calculation, and you will all be pleased to note that, at the US national average grid emission factor of 418 g CO2eq/kWh, a long range Tesla S will achieve 84 g CO2eq/km (if their specs are accurate). The standard proposed in the USA (Safer Affordable Fuel - Efficient (SAFE) Vehicles Rule for Model Years 2021-2026 ) is 210 gCO2eq/km

    This of course only covers the energy contribution to GHGs from the use of the car. (Scope 2). The emissions from building the battery averaged over the total charge that it takes over its lifetime must also be considered in comparing it to an ICE.


    ETA doing the calculation

    It seems that to construct a Tesla battery produces somewhere between 39000 and 196000 g CO2eq/kWh. Accepting Tesla's claim of 1500 charge cycles without significant degradation, that adds another 15 g/km).

    So far the Tesla achieves about half the Scope 2 and Scope 3 emissions of the SAFE standard.

    However:
    For the period 2020-2024, Regulation (EU) 2019/631 confirms the EU fleet-wide CO2 emission targets set under Regulations (EC) No 443/2009 and (EU) No 510/2011.

    Cars: 95 g CO2/km
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      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeAug 16th 2021
     
  5.  
    Posted By: AngusSo far the Tesla achieves about half the Scope 2 and Scope 3 emissions of the SAFE standard.
    Looks like they conform to EU standards too. And how do ICE vehicles compare? Other EVs?
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeAug 16th 2021 edited
     
    Worse. The point was that even Teslas won't conform to the 95 gCO2eq/km coming up.
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      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeAug 16th 2021
     
    What about horses?
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeAug 16th 2021
     
    They go slowly and fart.
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      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeAug 17th 2021
     
    But are they worse?