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    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeNov 1st 2013
     
    Doesn't Dutch form some plurals of nouns with an apostrophe and "s" (i.e. words ending in a single vowel?

    e.g. What's the plural of "radio" in Dutch?
  1.  
    Posted By: alsetalokinHow many volt's of energy do you need to run a hou'se?
    +2
  2.  
    Posted By: AsterixDoesn't Dutch form some plurals of nouns with an apostrophe and "s" (i.e. words ending in a single vowel?

    e.g. What's the plural of "radio" in Dutch?
    It's a Greek word meaning thigh hairs
    • CommentAuthortinker
    • CommentTimeNov 9th 2013
     
    The Iranian Scam...

    have the belief as I promise you right now saying Bismillah(In the Name of Allah) that this communication will later be a testimony in our life though we just known each other through internet which is now an unsecured means of communication since some people of wicked mind without conscience comes here to tell lies and put others into trouble but please read my message very well though it may be the least of what you expects from me since we are just new friend but like the meaning of my first name S**** in Farsi language, it is my wish and desire now to tell you all about me due to my happiness from knowing you. My names are S****, born and raised up into a Muslim family that cherish the principle of good moral child up bring in Islamic Republic of Iran.

    I decided to let you know everything about me because i have faith it was Masha Allah(Allah's will) that lead me to know you after fasting with offering prayers to him. My birthday is 18-11-1987 in ancient city of Zarand in Kerman province. My father, F**** of the blessed memory was a businessman but previously a diplomat that served at Iranian embassy in Senegal and Venezuela. Death never give me the opportunity of having to enjoy the comfort of my good home for long as i first lost my mother two days to my 16th birthday anniversary on Tuesday 18-11-2003 in a rape incident but i always believe Allah knows the best.

    It was after the death of my mother that my father concluded that Iran is no more safe for girls and he took the decision that i will continue my education in Senegal which he said is safer Muslim country with his previous experience there since many people have been raped in Iran without justice being done to the rapists.

    One of the documents in the file given to me by my late father was a bond certificate of Three million, two hundred thousand dollar in an account he opened with an Islamic bank of which i am the next of kin to the account. The bank requested me to appoint a representative on my behalf as trustee giving them his first and last name with email address so that they will tell him how to take the money on my behalf. I have already developed confidence with you since i believe knowing you was through divine intervention but please promise and assure me that you will always stand by me even after receiving the money in your account if you are willing to help me.
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      CommentAuthorDuracell
    • CommentTimeNov 26th 2013 edited
     
    September 07, 2013: Property trust event may be last ‘signing-in’

    From The Article:According to the trust’s organiser, Kilkenny landscape gardener Charlie Allen Sr, it has accepted assets worth up to €2bn from at least 2,000 debtors.

    It has yet to be tested in court despite an ongoing stand-off with receivers regarding occupation of a Kildare stud farm.

    At yesterday’s Bel Air signing-in session, additional publicans, hoteliers, families, and syndicates put their properties into the Rodolphus Allen Private Family Trust.

    ...

    The affirmation included a commitment to try to “identify, engage, and fulfil our true purpose on this planet, as unique fragments of Divine Consciousness, in our eternal spiritual quest for self-realisation”.

    Those entering the trust were told to have passports and €525 per property on hand — although the forms available on the day looked for €350 per folio.

    From 10am, people from all four provinces met with Mr Allen or at least four of his staff to discuss their options and sign trust documents in the presence of a notary public.

    A number of people asked questions about the trust and its strategy.

    They were not given any commitment that the scheme would work. In at least one case, Mr Allen said if people had doubts about the trust, they were better to remain outside it.

    A plan was outlined that first involved placing properties into the trust, and supposedly beyond the reach of the banks.

    The second part of the plan, attendees were told, was to prove that the mortgages attached to the properties were illegal. No details on this part were forthcoming.

    At a protest in Kildare last weekend, the trust’s organisers cited Brehon and common law but has so far refused to make its legal arguments public.

    The trust deeds cited an affiliation with the Universal Community Trusts, a loose international organisation that is linked to the freeman of the land philosophy and does not fully recognise nation states.


    November 26, 2013: Leader of mysterious trust, Charles Allen Snr, arrested

    From The Article:According to its own formation documents, the trust has explicitly set about fulfilling each persons’ “eternal spiritual quest for self-realisation”. But it has refused to set out its legal strategy.

    Recently High Court judge Peter Kelly described the correspondence from the trust as “nonsense” when it had been used in attempt to thwart the receivership of €51m in loans tied to the Submarine Bar and Ashleaf complex in Dublin.
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      CommentAuthormaryyugo
    • CommentTimeNov 26th 2013 edited
     
    The nastiest scam around these days is Cryptolocker ransom ware. Seems it even caught the cops recently and they paid the ransom... in bitcoins! Wow. You'd think someone would make a big effort to track these scumbags down.

    http://www.theguardian.com/technology/2013/nov/21/us-police-force-pay-bitcoin-ransom-in-cryptolocker-malware-scam

    Apparently, this arrives as an attachment to emails, often seemingly from a bank. But it then uses your email list to send itself out to your contacts so advising people never to open attachments from strangers doesn't help. I am not quite clear on why virus checkers don't catch it, at least when it begins to run. But apparently they don't. Something should also catch any program which tries to take over email software! But it doesn't. Where did virus checker makers go wrong?
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      CommentAuthormaryyugo
    • CommentTimeNov 26th 2013
     
    Well, it is claimed that antivirus programs will stop cryptolocker. Does anyone still operate without one? Anyway, here is a specific preventative you may want to use:

    http://www.foolishit.com/vb6-projects/cryptoprevent/

    http://www.foolishit.com/vb6-projects/cryptoprevent/cryptoprevent-auto-update/

    I wish they had chosen a different name for their web site though. More info:

    http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/virus-removal/cryptolocker-ransomware-information

    Bleepingcomputer.com is usually quite reliable and motivated.
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      CommentAuthorpcstru
    • CommentTimeNov 26th 2013 edited
     
    Posted By: maryyugoI am not quite clear on why

    And this is a surprise?

    virus checkers don't catch it, at least when it begins to run. But apparently they don't.

    That is simply wrong. I'm sure some don't. Some do.

    Something should also catch any program which tries to take over email software! But it doesn't. Where did virus checker makers go wrong?

    Obviously, it is a conspiracy by evil software developers and IT geeks, simply to make you suffer. On the other hand, since you don't seem to know what you are talking about ... maybe not.
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      CommentAuthormaryyugo
    • CommentTimeNov 26th 2013 edited
     
    Posted By: pcstruOn the other hand, since you don't seem to know what you are talking about ... maybe not.
    I'm sure you're a world class expert about virus checkers along with everything else in IT. Poor little old ignorant me, I just know what I read about it from reasonably credible sources.

    ETA: it's interesting to see that you cite a source (Symantec) which provides several pages of text, most of which is completely irrelevant and unhelpful to this issue. Symantec, BTW, totally sucks. It's crap. Their boilerplate is for the most part useless. And THAT is typical of many software companies. One of my long term gripes is HELP that doesn't help. All too common. Also, lame "wizards" that all too often won't work, won't report why, and are generally unreliable. Very common with MSFT.

    I provided a link to what appears to be a decent description and a preventative which apparently works and which some reliable folks with whom I have dealt before are actually making an effort to keep up to date.
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      CommentAuthorpcstru
    • CommentTimeNov 26th 2013
     
    Posted By: maryyugo
    Posted By: pcstruOn the other hand, since you don't seem to know what you are talking about ... maybe not.
    I'm sure you're a world class expert about virus checkers along with everything else in IT. Poor little old ignorant me, I just know what I read about it from reasonably credible sources.

    I'm not claiming to be a world class expert on virus checkers, simply pointing out you are (once again) wrong.

    ETA: it's interesting to see that you cite a source (Symantec) which provides several pages of text, most of which is completely irrelevant and unhelpful to this issue. Symantec, BTW, totally sucks. It's crap. I provided a link to what appears to be a decent description and a preventative which apparently works and which some reliable folks with whom I have dealt before are actually making an effort to keep up to date.

    The key bit of information is that it is present in their definitions and what it will be flagged as. You claim virus checkers don't detect it. The link falsifies your claim. Your are wrong. Again. Rather than admit that and learn from it, you abuse and insult.
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      CommentAuthormaryyugo
    • CommentTimeNov 26th 2013
     
    Posted By: maryyugoWell, it is claimed that antivirus programs will stop cryptolocker. Does anyone still operate without one?
    I originally read that antivirus programs do not in general stop this infection. When I read further and found that some might, I corrected the impression, which correction you apparently were in such a rush to impeach that you missed. That also is typical.
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      CommentAuthorpcstru
    • CommentTimeNov 26th 2013
     
    Posted By: maryyugoApparently, this arrives as an attachment to emails, often seemingly from a bank. But it then uses your email list to send itself out to your contacts so advising people never to open attachments from strangers doesn't help.


    Well, it helps if you are inclined to open anything from complete strangers AND if you are of a mind to take onboard good advice and change that behaviour. What I find curious is the unstated implication that attachments or links from friends are safe. Malware using address books on compromised machines as has been used for many years as a means of propagation. If you value your data, don't rely on being a good judge of what to open, click on or otherwise ask a machine to do.
    • CommentAuthorjoshs
    • CommentTimeNov 26th 2013 edited
     
    Posted By: pcstru
    Posted By: maryyugoI am not quite clear on why

    And this is a surprise?

    virus checkers don't catch it, at least when it begins to run. But apparently they don't.

    That is simply wrong. I'm sure some don't. Somedo.

    Something should also catch any program which tries to take over email software! But it doesn't. Where did virus checker makers go wrong?

    Obviously, it is a conspiracy by evil software developers and IT geeks, simply to make you suffer. On the other hand, since you don't seem to know what you are talking about ... maybe not.
    As for example: "Users of Kaspersky Internet Security are protected against all current modifications of CryptoLocker, preventing it from executing on their systems." I assume that given your link that also applies to Symantec customers. Some people have refused the good advice that they stop pretending to have skills to set-up and maintain computers. They simply bitch about what they encounter in the big bad world that has many imperfections as well as many bad actors. But this of course you know and your good counsel has gone as ignored as anyone's. Soon you may find yourself blamed by such people that nasty trojans exist at all.
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      CommentAuthormaryyugo
    • CommentTimeDec 2nd 2013 edited
     
    Posted By: maryyugoYet another fragrant scam. A variant on the Power Band one.


    Well, seems something similar is getting very popular. Copper-containing wear. Tons of testimonials and no science. A friend of mine with a knee problem was considering buying it to try. At least, it's not very expensive.

    http://www.tommiecopper.com/

    Looks like people fall for just about anything that sounds nice.
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      CommentAuthormaryyugo
    • CommentTimeDec 2nd 2013 edited
     
    I'm a bit amazed to find that protection against DOS attacks is expensive enough to warrant the price of this company! Wow. $370 million!

    http://www.techworld.com.au/article/533238/akamai_buy_ddos_protection_specialist_prolexic/?fp=16&fpid=1
    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeDec 3rd 2013
     
    http://www.manufacturing.net/news/2013/12/ethanol-maker-offered-63m-for-65-fuel-plant-jobs

    I'm left almost speechless with the stupidity of this. I'm surprised that Rossi hasn't gotten $6.3M in free money and $90M in federal loan guarantees.

    And people can't understand why I think that RAREnergia is a scam to get subsidies and credits...
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      CommentAuthormaryyugo
    • CommentTimeDec 5th 2013 edited
     
    Just when I thought I'd heard everything, I got a call from 888-858-1668. It was an excellent imitation of the usual very smooth professional woman's voice commonly used on telephone equipment messages. It said that their equipment indicated that something was wrong with one of my devices (but it was much more slickly worded than that). It invited me to press 1 if there was a problem and I wanted to set up an appointment with a technician, 2 if I was *certain* there was not and zero if I wanted more time to check! I imagine the next thing for those who press 1 is either an attempt at identity theft (phishing) or a charge on a credit card for the "appointment" which of course will never take place because the caller is probably in Ukraine or Nigeria.

    The tip off in this case was pretty clear. Real service providers identify on caller ID with their name and you can call them back if you don't trust caller ID, using their real listed number. But these asswipes gave a caller ID of "toll free caller" which is a common generic ID for phone scammers. Also, the voice did not identify the company which was calling. That never happens with legitimate calls from service providers!

    I really feel badly for old people, impaired people, or just those who don't keep up with tech scams. They could easily get caught with one like this. It was very slick.

    I did google the caller ID number and got no hits which is unusual. Either it's new or they rotate phony numbers fast.
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      CommentAuthormaryyugo
    • CommentTimeDec 9th 2013
     
    Here's an email I am not planning to click on!

    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeDec 9th 2013
     
    I've got a couple of numbers on Google Voice--never use them. One of them keeps getting messages for a drug dealer ("I need some oxy, morphine or codeine--can you get some?").
    • CommentAuthorBigOilRep
    • CommentTimeDec 9th 2013
     
    Posted By: AsterixOne of them keeps getting messages for a drug dealer

    Or doctor?