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    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeAug 31st 2013 edited
     
    Ah, but y'see, 'twasn't the water atall, atall, 'twas the wee folk:

  1.  
    Posted By: AsterixI really don't know where to post this; under "woo" or "scam". But the Irish Independent has fallen to new lows since the heady days of Steron:

    Miracle rado-energized water for sale

    To me, this also speaks to the quality of the Irish education system.


    That's an interesting one. By passing a real RF spark through air-water you do create nitrogen oxides that acidify the water, same as adding a bit of nitric acid to the water. You can demonstrate this for yourself by sealing the arc from your flyback transformer jacob's ladder and watching the yellow "smog" build up in your container. This is nitric oxide and reacts with water to form nitric acid. I don't know if this nitrogen is available to plants as nutrient, but certainly acidified water is "wetter" than pure distilled water.
    •  
      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeAug 31st 2013 edited
     
    @al
    Good call.

    Unfortunately for the Irish professors' patent application it has been known since 1903.
  2.  
    Posted By: Angus@al
    Good call.

    Unfortunately for the Irish professors' patent application it has been known since 1903.


    Well! And Birkeland, too! Thanks, I love this place, the inadvertent university of moletrap!
    •  
      CommentAuthormaryyugo
    • CommentTimeAug 31st 2013
     
    Wow. I'm rich if I download and run this attachment!

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    •  
      CommentAuthorDuracell
    • CommentTimeAug 31st 2013
     
    Posted By: AsterixI really don't know where to post this; under "woo" or "scam". But the Irish Independent has fallen to new lows since the heady days of Steron:

    Miracle rado-energized water for sale

    To me, this also speaks to the quality of the Irish education system.
    Fuck ...
    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeAug 31st 2013 edited
     
    Posted By: Angus@al
    Good call.

    Unfortunately for the Irish professors' patent application it has been known since 1903.


    Oh, I'm familiar with the process. It was used in Scandanavia to produce nitrogen compounds when there was an excess of hydropower before the Haber and Ostwald processes.

    The small amount of nitrogen added to the water, however, is inconsequential. You'd probably get far more during a thunderstorm. You'd get more nitrogen to the plant by urinating on it--and you'd also be supplying essential phosphorous as well.

    But the claims that this will end global warming, the need for GM crops and pesticides is pure blarney.
  3.  
    But is it _real_ blarney or fake blarney? It sounded real enough to me to make me think about setting up a little water-treatment system here, sell the water in bottles labelled with the Scary Heart of Skeesix and a flowering carnivorous plant...
    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeSep 1st 2013
     
    I'm certain that you'd find a purchaser, particularly if you added the vibration of unconditional love...
    •  
      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeSep 1st 2013
     
    And frequencies. Gotta have frequencies.
    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeSep 1st 2013 edited
     
    Besides, nitrogen alone, even if in large amounts, isn't sufficient to guarantee record crops. If it were, nobody would bother with potash and phosphorous.

    My late father worked most of his life in a steel mill--one of the old-style ones with blast furnaces, open-hearth furnaces, scarfing docks, soaking pits, blooming mills, etc. (I worked there long enough to know that I didn't want to spend my life doing it).

    Every spring, he'd bring 2 50 lb, burlap bags full of crude ammonium sulphate, obtained from the coke-oven scrubbers. He'd get a 30 gallon garbage can and dissolve a bunch of the sulfate in water, then use a hose-end siphon (cf. "Hozon") to spray the concentrate all over his lawn. He had the greenest, least-healthy lawn on the block. By autumn, you could pick out patches where the lawn had died. He'd just come along with more seed in the springtime. Grass on speed.

    Applied nitrogen to plants is not a fix for anything other than low soil nitrogen. Duh.

    It's like living only on sugar. Lots of calories to keep you going. Ultimately, you'll die of malnutrition.
    •  
      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeSep 1st 2013
     
    That grass was probably low on frequencies.
    • CommentAuthorLakes
    • CommentTimeSep 1st 2013
     
    The "energized" water goes down the sink a little bit quicker" :D
    •  
      CommentAuthormaryyugo
    • CommentTimeSep 1st 2013 edited
     
    Dear New York Times Reader,

    As you may be aware, on Tuesday, access to our Web site was impacted by a malicious attack at our domain name registrar.

    This resulted in many users being redirected to a bad domain address instead of NYTimes.com.

    We resolved the issue by early Tuesday evening but there have been some lingering problems due to some Internet Service Providers not yet updating our Domain Name System records.

    We fully expect that all access will be restored by the end of the day today and we deeply regret any inconvenience this may have caused.

    Sincerely,

    The New York Times


    I wonder what the registrar or NYT did wrong.
    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeSep 1st 2013 edited
     
    Seems that the secrecy behind Area 51 was mostly to avoid litigation and exposure of an illegal waste dump:

    Jonathan Turley's Story.

    Ah, the mind of a bureaucrat.
  4.  
    It's for our protection, you know.
  5.  
    Posted By: maryyugo
    Dear New York Times Reader,

    As you may be aware, on Tuesday, access to our Web site was impacted by a malicious attack at our domain name registrar.

    This resulted in many users being redirected to a bad domain address instead of NYTimes.com.

    We resolved the issue by early Tuesday evening but there have been some lingering problems due to some Internet Service Providers not yet updating our Domain Name System records.

    We fully expect that all access will be restored by the end of the day today and we deeply regret any inconvenience this may have caused.

    Sincerely,

    The New York Times


    I wonder what the registrar or NYT did wrong.

    There has been a lot of that going around. Large websites experiencing unexplained outages. Amazon, EBay, NYT, quite a few others lately.
    •  
      CommentAuthorlegendre
    • CommentTimeSep 1st 2013
     
    Posted By: LakesThe "energized" water goes down the sink a little bit quicker" :D


    What about the empowered variety?
  6.  
    Bloody Utah. Say no more.
    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeSep 2nd 2013
     
    Feh, you can still buy laundry balls here--and there are those who still firmly believe that they work.

    The last time I saw them being peddled around here, a water witch was selling them. (Yes, there are firm believers that a guy holding a couple of copper rods can locate water 300 feet below the surface and even tell you its mineral content).