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      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeFeb 23rd 2013
     
    Dt

    Add a haptic system and a bit of porn and Al will be in his heaven.

    Star Trek-style holodeck becomes reality as scientists invent 3D vitual reality system
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeFeb 23rd 2013
     
    Nonsense. You would have to be exactly in the centre of a circle of parallax panoramagrams to avoid pseudoscopic images, so only one person could use it. And nothing could pass behind anything in the image. It would put a serious crimp in any TV SFwriter's style.
    • CommentAuthorLakes
    • CommentTimeFeb 23rd 2013
     
    "Stare at Science all day" :)
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      CommentAuthorlegendre
    • CommentTimeFeb 23rd 2013
     
    A round movie theater? You don't say..
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeFeb 23rd 2013
     
    The Cooper Theatre was round, but its screen showed Cinerama films which did not span 360 degrees.

    As far as I can make out the first 360 degree theatre open to the general public was at Expo 67. Expo 67 was the beginning of a lot of advanced cinema technology, including IMAX.
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      CommentAuthorlegendre
    • CommentTimeFeb 23rd 2013
     
    Posted By: AngusThe Cooper Theatre was round, but its screen showed Cinerama films which did not span 360 degrees.


    Oh sure, I even saw a film or two there, back in the day. Sadly, I never had the opportunity to watch 2001 on that huge screen.

    Just pointing out that the concept isn't at all new, and has been re-invented several times, in various forms. IIRC, Disney World had a ride which was essentially a wrap-around theater, and that would have been in the mid-1970s. This thing that Trim linked to is just more of the same thing - this time, with motion tracking.

    But it's absolutely nothing like a Next Generation-type Holodeck. That's just pure fantasy.
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeFeb 23rd 2013
     
    I remember well the completely circular film at the telephone pavilion at Expo 67. They had all kinds of strange cinema formats there. One had two walls of screen separated by a huge vertical screen that ran up a couple of storeys, and you watched it all from a balcony. Fun times.
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      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeFeb 24th 2013 edited
     
    Oh well back to Joseph Michaels fractal shape shifting robot holodeck.

    This is the nearest I can get to it.

    LEGO(TM)s to the Stars:

    Joseph Michael luser babbles again

    Self-reconfiguring modular robot
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      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeMar 14th 2013
     
    • CommentAuthortinker
    • CommentTimeMar 15th 2013
     
    Hi Trim - the link above directs me to a google page demanding I open a GMail account. And I don't want one. So it will remain a mystery.
    • CommentAuthorLakes
    • CommentTimeMar 15th 2013
     
    Yup, asks me to sign in to my gmail, bit suspect for a webpage.
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      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeMar 15th 2013
     
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      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeFeb 18th 2016
     
    • CommentAuthorkorkskrew
    • CommentTimeFeb 18th 2016
     
    this seems like a new thing to have fiction writers providing product development guidance for high tech devices. Is there a precedent for this in high tech or another industry? Paradigm breaks are significant in these kinds of areas, because it suggests that a new technology is being used or viewed in a new way that is compelling.

    What I mean is that AR/VR is a new way of presenting video information, but bringing in the SF writers to provide product development guidence and producing content, makes it more than just a new video display, and moves it in the direction of being a new way to use a visual interface. That's important.
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeFeb 18th 2016
     
    I have always thought that a lot of technological development has been guided by the imaginations of SF writers , back to Jules Verne at least. Or maybe Mary Shelley. When artists started taking technology as a serious issue they opened up a new feedback process. The USS Nautilus owes more than its name to SF.
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    Ah, yes, what a Brave New World it is.
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      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeMar 28th 2016
     
    • CommentAuthorLakes
    • CommentTimeMar 28th 2016 edited
     
    Impressive if really of that quality, you can never be sure if they "tweaked" it with a bit of CGI.

    I imagine that setup to be too expensive for the home user, but ok for video conference business meetings (look I can do Holographic PowerPoint now!), save on travel and hotels etc.
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      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeMay 15th 2016 edited
     
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      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeMar 31st 2019