Vanilla 1.1.9 is a product of Lussumo. More Information: Documentation, Community Support.

    •  
      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeJul 6th 2021
     
    Here is what Feynman said about ratchets.

    Maxwell demon overheat.

    For historical interest, we would like to remark on a device invented by Maxwell, who first worked out the dynamical theory of gases. He supposed the following situation: We have two boxes of gas at the same temperature, with a little hole between them. At the hole sits a little demon (who may be a machine of course!). There is a door on the hole, which can be opened or closed by the demon. He watches the molecules coming from the left. Whenever he sees a fast molecule, he opens the door. When he sees a slow one, he leaves it closed. If we want him to be an extra special demon, he can have eyes at the back of his head, and do the opposite to the molecules from the other side. He lets the slow ones through to the left, and the fast through to the right. Pretty soon the left side will get cold and the right side hot. Then, are the ideas of thermodynamics violated because we could have such a demon?

    It turns out, if we build a finite-sized demon, that the demon himself gets so warm that he cannot see very well after a while. The simplest possible demon, as an example, would be a trap door held over the hole by a spring. A fast molecule comes through, because it is able to lift the trap door. The slow molecule cannot get through, and bounces back. But this thing is nothing but our ratchet and pawl in another form, and ultimately the mechanism will heat up. If we assume that the specific heat of the demon is not infinite, it must heat up. It has but a finite number of internal gears and wheels, so it cannot get rid of the extra heat that it gets from observing the molecules. Soon it is shaking from Brownian motion so much that it cannot tell whether it is coming or going, much less whether the molecules are coming or going, so it does not work.
    •  
      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeJul 6th 2021
     
    Might have posted this already.

    Scientists create solid crystal form of electrons in the lab.

    https://newatlas.com/physics/wigner-crystal-solid-electrons/
  1.  
    Now to find a use for it.
  2.  
    •  
      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeSep 2nd 2021
     
    Nice.
    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeDec 24th 2021
     
    •  
      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeDec 24th 2021
     
    Interesting.
  3.  
    A long time coming and still not mainstream
    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeDec 25th 2021
     
    I attribute that to waiting for certain fabrication technologies to mature.

    The eventual outcome is that the cost of memory will become stratospheric. /cyinc
  4.  
    Your Steinmetz, as promised
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aaBTVK4x1c4

    More to follow
  5.  
    https://scitechdaily.com/electron-whirlpools-seen-for-the-first-time-fluid-flow-could-enable-next-generation-electronics/

    Tungsten ditelluride ofc.
    (And here's me thinking it would be hafnium praseodymium indiide.)

    Maxwell whispers that for every complete turn of a current loop, the generated magnetic field increases.
    Is this the gateway to ExaTeslas?

    "Turn it off!" screamed Broadbent as every metallic object in the lab accelerated towards the ceiling. "TURN THE DAMN THING OFF!!!"
    •  
      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeJul 11th 2022
     
    Lifting stuff to the ceiling takes work. Ask any roofer.
    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeJul 11th 2022 edited
     
    4.5K, in flakes of a fairly exotic substance. Reminds me of real-world fluidics. Anyone remember the predictions of how we'd have fluidic phonographs?

    Maybe applicable to real-world, but very probably not in my lifetime.
    •  
      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeJul 11th 2022 edited
     
    It was the fluidic process controllers that floored me. Or ceilinged, if they were magnetic enough.

    I think some were actually used in specialist applications.
    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeJul 11th 2022
     
    Having misspent my youth in instrumentation and control, fluidics of one sort or another have been dominant in industrial process control in the 20th century, mostly because of imperviousness to EMI and tolerance of high temperatures.

    Also seems to me that some military bow-thrusters use fluidics. And of course, the ordinary automatic transmission.
    •  
      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeJul 11th 2022
     
    RIght, thanks. I wasn't aware it was so pervasive.
  6.  
    Posted By: AngusLifting stuff to the ceiling takes work. Ask any roofer.
    Indeed so. But all that's needed here is some finite grad B. That way you get to leverage work off the field itself.
    •  
      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeJul 11th 2022
     
    Whoa Nelly! "Leverage work off the field" sounds like it belongs in the lexicon with "slow in fast out". If you are going to get work out of the field you first have to put work into the field.

    Pull the other one. It's got bells on.
    •  
      CommentAuthorterry1094
    • CommentTimeJul 11th 2022
     
    Not a lot cost-wise:

    https://youtu.be/5SzPJQvijTE
    •  
      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeJul 11th 2022
     
    Now if they could just find a surplus Orbo to power the thing...