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    • CommentAuthorjoshs
    • CommentTimeAug 1st 2013
     
    Posted By: AngusScaling. d/dt (f(Kt) = K d/dt f(t)
    Except that he seemed to be expressing the idea that (d/dx(sin(x)))^4 = K*sin(x) where K>1.
    • CommentAuthorjoshs
    • CommentTimeAug 1st 2013
     
    Posted By: Asterix
    Posted By: alsetalokinThe blood rushes out of my head when I even think of a 40 kV, 2 amp power supply.


    Get your head in the right place and the 40KV will neatly cauterize the blood vessels, stopping the bleeding from your head.
    It will do so while blowing a 1/8" hole clear through your head.
    •  
      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeAug 1st 2013
     
    Posted By: joshs
    Posted By: AngusScaling. d/dt (f(Kt) = K d/dt f(t)
    Except that he seemed to be expressing the idea that (d/dx(sin(x)))^4 = K*sin(x) where K>1.


    Sorry - I wasn't keeping quantitative track.
    • CommentAuthorjoshs
    • CommentTimeAug 1st 2013
     
    Posted By: Andrew PalfreymanJust a side note about higher order time derivatives, which are often attributed almost magical properties by the more whimsical. For a sinewave, these increase in magnitude for each higher order, the multiplicative coefficient being "omega" = 2*PI*frequency. So the Nth order time derivative is omega^N bigger than the fundamental.

    At the birth of the radio era, electrical sinewaves came into general use. Nothing unexpected was seen then, nor has been since, in respect of these Nth order terms. I expect nature has sinewaves of her own too, and they've been going much longer. Like sounds.

    This post may be rubbish. YMMV
  1.  
    Posted By: joshs
    Posted By: Andrew PalfreymanJust a side note about higher ordertime derivatives, which are often attributed almost magical properties by the more whimsical. For asinewave, these increase in magnitude for each higher order, the multiplicative coefficient being "omega" = 2*PI*frequency. So the Nth order time derivative is omega^N bigger than the fundamental.

    At the birth of the radio era, electrical sinewaves came into general use. Nothing unexpected was seen then, nor has been since, in respect of these Nth order terms. I expect nature has sinewaves of her own too, and they've been going much longer. Like sounds.

    This post may be rubbish.YMMV

    I dunno about you guys, but I'm talking about the usual sinewave sin(w*t), where 'w' is omega, the angular frequency
    •  
      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeAug 1st 2013
     
    d/d(wt) sin (wt) = cos(wt)
  2.  
    Posted By: Angusd/d(wt) sin (wt) = cos(wt)
    I'm doing d/dt
    •  
      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeAug 1st 2013 edited
     
    Chain rule

    dy/dt = dy/du du/dt

    d sin(wt)/d(t) = d sin (wt)/d(wt) d(wt)/dt = cos(wt) * w


    Notice the bolded portion.

    ETA This post was in response to your initial comment ("wrong").

    I know you are differentiating with respect to t not w t. My point is that joshs comment is correct as well. d sin(t)/dt = cos(t). And yes, the higher the frequency, the stronger will be the differential, as reactive components show in practice.

    I suspect we are all having a violent agreement.
  3.  
    That's all I was saying. Sheeesh

    The default formula for a time-varying sinusoid is sin (wt)
    •  
      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeAug 1st 2013
     
    Posted By: Andrew PalfreymanThe default formula for a time-varying sinusoid is sin (wt)

    There I would have to disagree.
    • CommentAuthorLakes
    • CommentTimeAug 2nd 2013
     
    Andrew needs a flux capacitor for all those Jigga-watts ;)
    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeAug 2nd 2013
     
    I'm still trying to get my head around what this has to do with hydrogen thyratrons. I guess I lost the thread somewhere.
  4.  
    Posted By: Angus
    Posted By: Andrew PalfreymanThe default formula for a time-varying sinusoid is sin (wt)

    There I would have to disagree.
    So what's your version of this default? I'm ignoring amplitude and phase, since they don't contribute to the discussion about time derivatives of course. But if you insist, the default is A sin(wt + phi)
    • CommentAuthorjoshs
    • CommentTimeAug 2nd 2013
     
    Posted By: LakesAndrew needs a flux capacitor for all those Jigga-watts ;)
    It is a sign of a Russian script writer or science advisor. Giga is pronounced "jigga" by Russians.
  5.  
    Not to be confused with a jigger, which is useful in its own way.
  6.  
    Or a jiggle, also very useful.

  7.  
    Oh, that has to be plural. Independent suspension.
    •  
      CommentAuthorlegendre
    • CommentTimeAug 3rd 2013 edited
     
    St. Pauli Girl!

    It's not all that bad, really.. and fairly popular around here. Both the light and the dark are worth a drink.

    But don't let the name fool you, the stuff is made in Bremen - wherever the hell that is.
    •  
      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeAug 3rd 2013 edited
     
    Germany

    Where they actually know how to make beer.
    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeAug 3rd 2013
     
    Posted By: AngusGermany

    Where they actually know how to make beer.


    ...as evidenced by the number of German brewers receiving awards.

    Brewing awards for 2013