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      CommentAuthorlegendre
    • CommentTimeAug 3rd 2013 edited
     
    Posted By: Asterix
    Posted By: AngusGermany

    Where they actually know how to make beer.


    ...as evidenced by the number of German brewers receiving awards.

    Brewing awards for 2013


    Aha, I see that Sierra Nevada Pale Ale took top honors for Keg Ale! It's wonderful stuff, in fact there's a 12-pack sitting in the kitchen at the moment. If you've ever wondered what Summit EPA tastes like, Sierra is very, very close.. I drink the two interchangeably.

    And sad but true, the German beer industry has gone to the dogs. A friend visiting from Germany a few years ago - an avid beer fan - was lamenting the fact that he has to come to the USA to find any variety of 'good' beers. He fell in love with Summit on first meeting, said that you can't get anything that good back home, at least not commonly.

    ETA: While it was a year or two ago, I read that the 'alco-pop' thing is all the rage in Germany these days. It's cheap, strong, and apparently quite popular with the younger crowd. Now I'm not sure exactly what they're drinking over there, but the ones I've tried in the States have been utter puke. The Four Loco is a great example - utterly disgusting, insipid crap. Lots of sugar and artificial fruity flavors to cover the horrid malt liquor / fortified wine base they make it from.
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeAug 3rd 2013
     
    Posted By: Asterix
    Posted By: AngusGermany

    Where they actually know how to make beer.


    ...as evidenced by the number of German brewers receiving awards.

    Brewing awards for 2013



    Maybe I should have written "knew". I haven't been there for a while. And Euro rules have been putting pressure on the Reinheitsgebot.

    But I'd be surprised to find bad beer in Germany.
    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeAug 3rd 2013
     
    If you're interested in the complete list of awards here it is.

    It was interesting to see the number of Eastern European entries that medaled--and Japanese.
    • CommentAuthortinker
    • CommentTimeAug 3rd 2013
     
    They have some great beers in Japan, but funnily enough no idea of how to serve it. 'Throw it into the glass' about sums it up.
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      CommentAuthorlegendre
    • CommentTimeAug 3rd 2013 edited
     
    Posted By: tinkerThey have some great beers in Japan, but funnily enough no idea of how to serve it. 'Throw it into the glass' about sums it up.


    Ok, you got me, tink.

    Tell us how they're supposed to serve it, if not poured or drawn into a glass?

    Beer bong or something?
    • CommentAuthortinker
    • CommentTimeAug 3rd 2013 edited
     
    Silly billy! By thrown into the glass I mean they put the glass down, upend the bottle and empty it in about 10 seconds max. Which means you get flattish beer with a very large head. Head is good, but not too much of it. This is how you should pour out beer...


    Hold your glass at a 45° angle. Pour the beer, targeting the middle of the slope of the glass. Don't be afraid to add some air between the bottle and glass.

    At the half-way point bring the glass at a 90° angle and continue to pour in the middle of the glass. This will induce the perfect foam head. And remember, having a head on a beer is a good thing. It releases aromatics and adds to the overall presentation. You may also want to gradually add distance between the bottle and glass as you pour, to also inspire a good head. An ideal head should be 1" to 1-1/2".

    Worth mentioning that in Germany there are actual laws governing the speed with which draft beer is pumped into your glass.
  1.  
    Try that Japanese method with White Castle. Ho ho ho.
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeAug 3rd 2013
     
    Stuff and nonsense. You put the glass under the Fass straight up. You fill it half way., letting the foam come to the top. You wait until the foam hardens a bit, as you do with the milk in a cappuccino, then fill a bit more. Repeat until glass mostly full, and a good solid head.Should take 5 to 10 minutes.
  2.  
    That's not exactly dumping it in
    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeAug 4th 2013
     
    I don't know if this is a recapitulation of one of the techniques described above, but I drink a lot of stout and porter, and I pour like this:

    Start off by pouring into a tilted glass by aiming the stream where the side meets the floor of the glass until you get about 1/2+ full. Let the head stabilize and firm up, then finish by pouring the remainder straight down into the middle of a fully upright glass.

    Doubtless ales and lagers require a different technique, but with stout, I really appreciate a head that can keep a spoon standing.

    Depending on my mood and what I'm eating, I'll occasionally sprinkle a tiny bit of salt on the head. It seems to mellow the "hoppiness" with some foods. (I know, this is an unpardonable sin, but I like it).
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      CommentAuthoralsetalokin
    • CommentTimeAug 4th 2013 edited
     
    After a rough day towing in the Mohave, I liked to relax and rehydrate with a tall plastic tumbler of crushed ice, poured full with dark Heineken. That is the way to drink beer.

    When you are thirsty and tired, I mean, not necessarily with the ice.

    Sierra Pale is about the best of the nationally available once-microbrews. And Chico is one hell of a party town. I have a couple of very fond memories of Chico and a little blonde grandmother called Viki.

    But if you ever see Shiner Wild Hare pale ale, give it a try.
  3.  
    Posted By: AsterixIf you're interested in the complete list of awardshere it is.

    It was interesting to see the number of Eastern European entries that medaled--and Japanese.


    I'm surprised that Dicken's Cider didn't get the hard cider award. You can't go wrong, with a hard Dicken's Cider.
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      CommentAuthorlegendre
    • CommentTimeAug 4th 2013
     
    @tinker

    As if.. as if.. as if I don't know how to pour a goddamn beer? Ha!

    Anyfyuckingway, I was taking exception with what seemed to be your emphasis on the unsuitability of a common drinking glass.. not a rough & tumble pour; what kind of idiot does that? (An idiot who likes their beer a bit flatter, I'd say. If that's their style, so it is).
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      CommentAuthorlegendre
    • CommentTimeAug 4th 2013
     
    Posted By: alsetalokinSierra Pale is about the best of the nationally available once-microbrews.


    It sure is, and IMHO, one of their great strengths is the ability to hold some seriously tight tolerances. Sierra Nevada IPA is reliably repeatable by even amateur beer servers.

    That beer is so consistent from batch-to-batch, you just +always+ know you're going to get a great glass of ale, no matter where it is (so long as it's fresh, and that +is+ one genuine potential caveat).
  4.  
    In Chico... it's fresh.

    (Viki was only a little stale...)
    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeAug 4th 2013
     
    Posted By: alsetalokin
    I'm surprised that Dicken's Cider didn't get the hard cider award. You can't go wrong, with a hard Dicken's Cider.


    Is that anything like a nice cold Griesedieck?
  5.  
    A rather unfortunate name
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      CommentAuthorlegendre
    • CommentTimeAug 12th 2013
     
    A short diversion.

    Ever heard of Eric the Car Guy? He's got a fair YT following, and generally he seems to know what he's doing. But not always..

    Here's a great little video he made on exactly how not to solder.. and it's not just what he does, listen to what he says: http://youtu.be/viIZ8k60awY?t=3m

    (The victim in this case, is the PCB of a 1990's Honda PGM-FI main relay. This relay switches power to both the fuel pump and the fuel injectors.)
    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeAug 12th 2013
     
    That reminds me of having to re-solder every blasted relay board in my old Volvo 960 brick. All Robert Bosch products assembled with good old EU RoHS lead-free solder. I first noticed issues when the headlights would suddenly turn off, then come back on.

    I later learned from the Turbobrick community that several folks routinely resoldered all of the relays whether or not they were causing problems.

    But yeah, Eric doesn't know how to solder.
  6.  
    I recommend that he stick to acid-core solder, it's the richest kind and will flow nicely onto his circuit board. Oh, and a red-hot butterknife works a lot better than a rusty nail for a soldering tip.

    If more than one joint on the board is bad, you can fix them all at once by using the propane torch in your plumbing repair kit.