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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeAug 9th 2019 edited
     
    I never ran into Mers Kutt, though I was an undergrad at Queen's in the early '60s, nor ran into the MCM/70. APL seems to have been a rather Canadian enterprise - Iverson was one of us too. I don't know what you might deduce from that obscure fact.
    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeAug 9th 2019
     
    One of my friends described Ken as "one of the most boring lecturers that you could imagine". Apparently the first words of his mouth were something like "Consider a language L..." (make that a script "L").
    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeAug 9th 2019
     
    There was a divide in the 60s and early 70s over the preferred scientific programming language. Europeans tended to like Algol; USAns gravitated toward FORTRAN. ACM Collected Algorithms (CALGO) would take submissions in either--and there were stalwart encampments for both. FORTRAN was simple and could be implemented with a 48 character set (like you'd find on an 024 or 026 keypunch). Algol was more elegant, but was harder to implement and benefited from a larger character set.

    So what did the personal computer industry adopt? BASIC--and not just one BASIC, but many, many flavors of it. (sign)
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeAug 9th 2019 edited
     
    Must be a Canuck thing then. I recall my first lecture in tensor analysis from the Chairman of the math department at Queen's, Prof. J. Coleman, it was. He wrote a large T on the blackboard and said " A tensor is that which transforms as a tensor." He went on in that vein for a term. I did not do well in that course.
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeAug 9th 2019
     
    Ah yes - BASIC. I remember writing a lot of BASIC spaghetti at one period, thankfully gone with the snows of yesteryear.
    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeAug 9th 2019
     
    I had a similar experience--a computability theory course taught by a visiting Cherman prof with illegible handwriting and very bad command of the English language--and, of course, his back to the class the entire time. I dropped out after about 2 weeks when I realized that my notes made absolutely no sense. I re-enrolled the next term and did well.
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    We had a local computer at Hinckley and so in 1965 we sixth-formers could submit FORTRAN which got put onto punched cards and run.
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      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeOct 3rd 2019
     
    EVERYTHING WE KNOW ABOUT MATH COULD BE WRONG.

    https://futurism.com/the-byte/mathematician-everything-math-wrong
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeOct 3rd 2019
     
    there is a non-zero chance that some of our great castles are built on sand,” read his presentation...But I think it’s small.
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      CommentAuthoraber0der
    • CommentTimeOct 11th 2019
     
    Mathturbation.
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      CommentAuthoraber0der
    • CommentTimeOct 29th 2019
     
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    A most surprising result overlooked in elementary linear algebra for centuries
    https://www.quantamagazine.org/neutrinos-lead-to-unexpected-discovery-in-basic-math-20191113/
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeNov 14th 2019
     
    That's rather surprising!
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    This
    https://www.quantamagazine.org/mathematicians-catch-a-pattern-by-figuring-out-how-to-avoid-it-20191125
    reminded me of my prime sieve conjecture
    https://math.stackexchange.com/questions/514183/is-my-sieve-generalisable
    so we shall see if I get a nibble from Prof. Green.

    My work with Vincent came to an abrupt end when I found a mistake in his work and provided the correction. I suspect he was pissed off that a non-academic like myself could do that to him. It was a shame because he started off so enthusiastically.
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    Posted By: AngusThat's rather surprising!

    Here's another linear algebra surprise - this time entirely personal. Here I sit at this relatively ripe old age never having understood the geometric significance of a covector. This morning, the scales fell from my eyes.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rG2q77qunSw
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      CommentAuthoraber0der
    • CommentTimeDec 1st 2019 edited
     
    Sheometry, the feminist version of geometry I've just made up, only deals with scents, rearrangement of furniture to meet feng shui industrial standard certification and homeopathic preparations.

    Now I can't remember what I was about to say. Sorry.