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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeJul 28th 2013
     
    If you say X and X is self-evident, does that not make it true?
  1.  
    That question is tautological. It doesn't even rise to the level of rhetorical.
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeJul 28th 2013
     
    Perhaps, but the answer to it is "no".
  2.  
    No it's not
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    Just being ornery today. I think it's the cereal
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      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeJul 28th 2013
     
    Porridge oats, ginger and cinnamon.
  4.  
    and now for something completely different
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sOs1O85uEfA
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeJul 28th 2013
     
    Insufficiently different.
  5.  
    Good point. I've been "literaled". Al did that to me yesterday with his "I cannot describe...distraught" thingie. Well, I'm going to have to be more careful.
  6.  
    • CommentAuthortinker
    • CommentTimeJul 29th 2013 edited
     
    I loved this little snippet...

    A. The second generation engines will be capable of producing a specific thrust of 30kN/kW. Thus for 1 kilowatt (typical of the power in a microwave oven) a static thrust of 3 tonnes can be obtained, which is enough to support a large car. This is clearly adequate for terrestrial transport applications.
    The static thrust/power ratio is calculated assuming a superconducting EmDrive with a Q of 5 x 109. This Q value is routinely achieved in superconducting cavities.
    Note however, because the EmDrive obeys the law of conservation of energy, this thrust/power ratio rapidly decreases if the EmDrive is used to accelerate the vehicle along the thrust vector. (See Equation 16 of the theory paper). Whilst the EmDrive can provide lift to counter gravity, (and is therefore not losing kinetic energy), auxiliary propulsion is required to provide the kinetic energy to accelerate the vehicle.

    So- a drive that works fine so long as you don't want to go anywhere,.
    • CommentAuthorLakes
    • CommentTimeJul 29th 2013
     
    Posted By: Andrew PalfreymanNo it's not
    Would you like the five minute argument or the full course?
    • CommentAuthorLakes
    • CommentTimeJul 29th 2013
     
    Posted By: tinkerI loved this little snippet...

    A. The second generation engines will be capable of producing a specific thrust of 30kN/kW. Thus for 1 kilowatt (typical of the power in a microwave oven) a static thrust of 3 tonnes can be obtained, which is enough to support a large car. This is clearly adequate for terrestrial transport applications.
    The static thrust/power ratio is calculated assuming a superconducting EmDrive with a Q of 5 x 109. This Q value is routinely achieved in superconducting cavities.
    Note however, because the EmDrive obeys the law of conservation of energy, this thrust/power ratio rapidly decreases if the EmDrive is used to accelerate the vehicle along the thrust vector. (See Equation 16 of the theory paper). Whilst the EmDrive can provide lift to counter gravity, (and is therefore not losing kinetic energy), auxiliary propulsion is required to provide the kinetic energy to accelerate the vehicle.

    So- a drive that works fine so long as you don't want to go anywhere,.
    It can provide lift as long as its not moving??
    • CommentAuthortinker
    • CommentTimeJul 29th 2013
     
    So he claims...at a wopping 3 tons/kilowatt. Anti-gravity here we come.
  7.  
    So what are you saying.. .he has invented the floor?

    My floor thrusts upward with a force proportional to the mass placed upon it, and the force reduces very rapidly if it is used to accelerate the mass along the thrust vector. This disadvantage can however be overcome by making use of a counterintuitive fact of the behaviour of floors: if you thrust against them with more than the object's weight, they will push back with a new force, which _does_ allow some acceleration and displacement along the original thrust vector produced by the floor.

    I call this new force "bounce". And my floor's efficiency is extreme, to say the least, improving with the magnitude of the mass placed upon it, up to a limit defined by the material strength of which the floor is made.
    • CommentAuthorjoshs
    • CommentTimeJul 29th 2013
     
    Posted By: alsetalokinSo what are you saying.. .he has invented the floor?

    My floor thrusts upward with a force proportional to the mass placed upon it, and the force reduces very rapidly if it is used to accelerate the mass along the thrust vector. This disadvantage can however be overcome by making use of a counterintuitive fact of the behaviour of floors: if you thrust against them with more than the object's weight, they will push back with a new force, which _does_ allow some acceleration and displacement along the original thrust vector produced by the floor.

    I call this new force "bounce". And my floor's efficiency is extreme, to say the least, improving with the magnitude of the mass placed upon it, up to a limit defined by the material strength of which the floor is made.
    He has invented the investor sanitary money transport device.
    • CommentAuthorLakes
    • CommentTimeJul 29th 2013
     
    Money transport Device = Wallet
    • CommentAuthorjoshs
    • CommentTimeJul 29th 2013
     
    We are not talking any ordinary wallet. We are talking structural ceramic hydrodynamic transport.
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      CommentAuthorEndeavour
    • CommentTimeJul 29th 2013
     
    Posted By: tinkerI loved this little snippet...

    A. The second generation engines will be capable of producing a specific thrust of 30kN/kW. Thus for 1 kilowatt (typical of the power in a microwave oven) a static thrust of 3 tonnes can be obtained, which is enough to support a large car. This is clearly adequate for terrestrial transport applications.
    The static thrust/power ratio is calculated assuming a superconducting EmDrive with a Q of 5 x 109. This Q value is routinely achieved in superconducting cavities.
    Note however, because the EmDrive obeys the law of conservation of energy, this thrust/power ratio rapidly decreases if the EmDrive is used to accelerate the vehicle along the thrust vector. (See Equation 16 of the theory paper). Whilst the EmDrive can provide lift to counter gravity, (and is therefore not losing kinetic energy), auxiliary propulsion is required to provide the kinetic energy to accelerate the vehicle.

    So- a drive that works fine so long as you don't want to go anywhere,.


    I read it that you have a car suspended in the air with your family and friends inside and then can get a donkey to tow it.
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      CommentAuthorTrim
    • CommentTimeJul 29th 2013 edited
     
    Why a donkey?

    Why not a propeller or jet engine.

    Have parachutes handy if you want to move off a skyscraper though.