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    • CommentAuthorloreman
    • CommentTimeNov 21st 2013
     
    @Angus & Asterix,

    If you're interested in technically challenging works for brass, you might like to have a look at Ornothologia. The composer's someone I know pretty well and he's well known for writing virtuosic stuff.
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeNov 21st 2013
     
    Good trumpeter. Odd coincidence - an old friend of mine, the (just retired) first horn of the Vancouver Symphony is also a G'froerer, and his daughter is principal flute of the National Arts Centre orchestra in Ottawa. Is there something unusual about G'froerers. The name can't be that common.
    • CommentAuthorloreman
    • CommentTimeNov 21st 2013
     
    I think my daughter plays it better (but then I'm biased). It's quite a feat, anyway.
    • CommentAuthorAsterix
    • CommentTimeNov 21st 2013
     
    Interesting--but Mr. G'Froerer is actually playing his trumpet.
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    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Water_divining

    A 1948 study tested 58 dowsers' ability to detect water. None of them was more reliable than chance.[16] A 1979 review examined many controlled studies of dowsing for water, and found that none of them showed better than chance results.[5] A 2006 study of grave dowsing in Iowa reviewed 14 published studies and determined that none of them correctly predicted the location of human burials, and simple scientific experiments demonstrated the fundamental principles commonly used to explain grave dowsing were incorrect.[17]

    More recently a study[18] was undertaken in Kassel, Germany, under the direction of the Gesellschaft zur Wissenschaftlichen Untersuchung von Parawissenschaften (GWUP) [Society for the Scientific Investigation of the Parasciences]. The three-day test of some 30 dowsers involved plastic pipes through which water flow could be controlled and directed. The pipes were buried 50 centimeters under a level field, the position of each marked on the surface with a colored strip. The dowsers had to tell whether water was running through each pipe. All the dowsers signed a statement agreeing this was a fair test of their abilities and that they expected a 100 percent success rate. However, the results were no better than chance.


    Short sharp confessions:
    In the seventies I owned the L-shaped metal rods and it never worked well.
    The same can be said for my pyramid razor blade sharpener, which was blunt and gave me a rash.
    I blame Lyall Watson.
    • CommentAuthorloreman
    • CommentTimeFeb 2nd 2014
     
    I blame plastic. How could anyone dowse through that ?
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeFeb 2nd 2014
     
    Posted By: Andrew Palfreymanhttp://www.physicsintrouble.iwarp.com/VerdrehungFan_Grandview.html


    I take it pretty serious to see grammar like that exhibited in front of innocent children.
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      CommentAuthormaryyugo
    • CommentTimeFeb 2nd 2014
     
    Posted By: Andrew Palfreymanhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Water_divining
    What makes you think about that at this moment?
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    Because I was reading a bio of someone interesting to me, and his hobbies were a little odd - ball lightning and water divining. He was
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roger_Clifton_Jennison
    and he invented phase closure, a sine qua non for VLBI. I was reading about VLBI because I was wondering if we had any telescopes in space, and came there from the black hole reading I was doing, which led me to a new proposed European millimetre telescope array for observing Sagr A* at the centre of the Milky Way.

    It's so logical...
    Black holes -> telescope array -> VLBI -> Jennison -> water divining.
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    Veproject does it again, with two important historical PMMs.

    The Stevins inclined plane:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JYtfq6qRrh8

    The Redheffer Perpetual Motion:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r-qfY0sUAqA

    I love these people!
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeFeb 3rd 2014
     
    I saw those. These people do good work. Who is it?
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    I love the story of the old geezer in the attic turning a crank and eating his lunch
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      CommentAuthorAngus
    • CommentTimeFeb 3rd 2014
     
    The Ancient Egyptians frequently experimented with ramps, levers and various types of stone used in the construction of pyramids.


    I am disappoint. Where are the explanations I can send to my woo-addicted bro about how the ancient Incas built Sacsayhuman with the five ton irregular masonry?
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    If in doubt, throw another few thousand slaves at the problem
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    Internal ramps.
    • CommentAuthorLakes
    • CommentTimeFeb 3rd 2014
     
    Posted By: alsetalokinVeproject does it again, with two important historical PMMs.

    The Stevins inclined plane:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JYtfq6qRrh8

    The Redheffer Perpetual Motion:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r-qfY0sUAqA

    I love these people!
    The first one is a very good trick, no heavy base or large parts to conceal a drive motor, must be using a fishing line drive. :)
    • CommentAuthorLakes
    • CommentTimeFeb 3rd 2014
     
    Posted By: Angus
    Posted By: Andrew Palfreymanhttp://www.physicsintrouble.iwarp.com/VerdrehungFan_Grandview.html


    I take it pretty serious to see grammar like that exhibited in front of innocent children.
    Interview or an Interwoo? :D